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I am having the following problem processing big data in the database:

Basically all the metering from digital sensors are stored in the database for each second. What the reports should show from all that data is only the occurred changes, for example at time X the register #1 changed value from 0 to 1.

I have created a procedure that is able to return only the data i need (the changes), and that is saving me a lot of processing in php BUT the big problem is that for a current data of 4 days the query takes 6 * N seconds to complete where N is the number of the selected registers.

Now i was wondering what is the best solution to overcome this problem.

Another thought is to make a trigger on each new insert of the data metering but the problem is that this will be more complicated since i will need to look into the previous metering that were submitted at another time.

So I thought to create views that will be automatically updated when new data arrives in some way. That means when the request is made for the reports the data will be ready and fetched from the view.

Will this be a good solution?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Identifying status changes from your existing data is possible with a single query, but (as you have discovered) quite expensive. I would urge you to store each status change in a cache.

As @Fluffeh explained, looking up the latest status from your existing table won't be very expensive if you use a suitable index; so the trigger approach ought to be quite reasonable.

Therefore:

  1. Define a suitable index (if it does not already exist):

    ALTER TABLE existing_table ADD INDEX (register_id, timestamp);
    
  2. Create a table for the cache (and optionally set user permissions so that it cannot be directly modified by your application):

    CREATE TABLE status_changes VALUES (
      register_id ...,
      timestamp   TIMESTAMP,
      old_status  ...,
      new_status  ...,
    
      PRIMARY KEY                (register_id, timestamp),
    
      FOREIGN KEY                (register_id, timestamp, old_status)
       REFERENCES existing_table (register_id, timestamp, status),
    
      FOREIGN KEY                (register_id, timestamp, new_status)
       REFERENCES existing_table (register_id, timestamp, status)
    );
    
  3. Define a trigger from a user that has permission to modify the new table:

    DELIMITER ;;
    
    CREATE TRIGGER record_change AFTER INSERT ON existing_table FOR EACH ROW
    BEGIN
      DECLARE  _last_status ... ;
    
      SELECT   last.status
      INTO     _last_status
      FROM     existing_table AS last
      WHERE    last.register_id <=> NEW.register_id
           AND last.timestamp    <  NEW.timestamp
      ORDER BY last.timestamp DESC
      LIMIT    1;
    
      IF NOT NEW.status <=> _last_status THEN
        INSERT INTO status_changes (
          register_id,
          timestamp,
          old_status,
          new_status
        ) VALUES (
          NEW.register_id,
          NEW.timestamp,
          _last_status,
          NEW.status
        );
      END IF;
    END;;
    
    DELIMITER ;
    
  4. Populate the new table from the historical data:

    INSERT IGNORE INTO status_changes (
      register_id,
      timestamp,
      old_status,
      new_status
    )
    SELECT NEW.register_id,
           NEW.timestamp,
           (
             SELECT   last.status
             FROM     existing_table AS last
             WHERE    last.register_id <=> NEW.register_id
                  AND last.timestamp    <  NEW.timestamp
             ORDER BY last.timestamp DESC
             LIMIT    1
           ) AS _last_status,
           NEW.status
    FROM   existing_table AS NEW
    WHERE  NOT NEW.status <=> (
             SELECT   last.status
             FROM     existing_table AS last
             WHERE    last.register_id <=> NEW.register_id
                  AND last.timestamp    <  NEW.timestamp
             ORDER BY last.timestamp DESC
             LIMIT    1
           )
    ;
    
share|improve this answer
    
im sorry, what is the last query needed for? Im currently working on making the status changes after each insert in the table. That would be enough for me to get the status changes for each register for a period in low time –  George Nikolaides Sep 14 '12 at 12:40
    
@GeorgeNikolaides: I assumed that you had a database full of historical data from which you would want to populate the new table? That's all that step 4 does (as a one-off exercise), then the trigger takes over for all subsequent/new data. –  eggyal Sep 14 '12 at 13:14
    
actually the database is filled each second with a new metering (sensor values - 0s and 1s) and as you suggested what im trying to do now is to monitor the changes on 0's and 1's in a new table. that will increase the retrieve time for the reports and trends. –  George Nikolaides Sep 14 '12 at 13:35
    
@GeorgeNikolaides: If you're only interested in changes from now on, and will not want any analysis of historical changes, then you can omit step 4. –  eggyal Sep 14 '12 at 14:12
    
thanks again, works like a charm –  George Nikolaides Sep 14 '12 at 15:43

I am assuming that your tables are nicely indexed and that your queries are using those indexes nicely?

In this case, you seem to potentially benefit most from a composite index - one on both date and register. An index on each one will help, but a composite index on both will help much more.

The syntax to add a composite index is:

alter table yourTableName add index yourIndexName(col1, col2);

mysql> select * from table1;

+---------+------+------+-------------+
| autonum | ID   | name | metavalue   |
+---------+------+------+-------------+
|       1 |    1 | Rose | Drinker     |
|       2 |    1 | Rose | Nice Person |
|       3 |    1 | Rose | Runner      |
|       4 |    2 | Gary | Player      |
|       5 |    2 | Gary | Funny       |
|       6 |    2 | Gary | NULL        |
|       7 |    2 | Gary | Smelly      |
+---------+------+------+-------------+
7 rows in set (0.01 sec)

mysql> alter table table1 add index autoNumID(autonum, ID);
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.02 sec)
Records: 0  Duplicates: 0  Warnings: 0

The other thing you could look into is making a summary table that is updated one (per hour or per day etc). Use a CRON or something else to run a query which will create a summary of your data into a much smaller table that your reporting will work off.

share|improve this answer
    
unfortunately i am not using any indexes and i think that this is the biggest problem. the values are converted from binary values (0s and 1s) to a single decimal value. that means that in the database each second the only thing stored is a decimal value. That means that each time i fetch the data i have to do something like this: SUBSTRING(REVERSE(LPAD(BIN(DiValue), 16, 0)) FROM alias_offset FOR 1) –  George Nikolaides Sep 14 '12 at 10:33
    
picks jaw up off the ground Oh deary goodness holy batman my, I think we have a winner then. –  Fluffeh Sep 14 '12 at 10:35
    
there is no inner join, if that is what you are saying –  George Nikolaides Sep 14 '12 at 10:38
1  
@GeorgeNikolaides No, I am saying that if you are performing complex subtrings and other computations on that many rows (and they aren't indexed), that we have come to your problem. That's why your queries are taking so long. Your database is performing so many complex calculations - In this case, you really need to make summary tables. –  Fluffeh Sep 14 '12 at 10:47

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