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I'm trying to find the words between the brackets.

var str = "asdfasdfkjh {{word1}} asdf fff fffff {{word2}} asdfasdf";
var pattern = /{{\w*}}/g;
var str.match(pattern);  // ["{{word1}}","{{word2}}"]

This closes the deal, but gives it with the brackets, and i don't want them. Sure, if I used the native replace on the results i could remove them. But i want the regexp to do the same.

I've also tried: var pattern = /(?:{{)(\w*)(?:}})/g

but i can't find the real deal. Could you help me?

Edit: i might need to add a note that the words are dynamic

solution:

Bases on Tim Piezcker awnser i came with this solution:

var arr = [],      
re = /{{(\w?)}}/g,item;

while (item = re.exec(s))
arr.push(item[1]);
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Bases on Tim Piezcker awnser i came with this solution: var arr = [], re = /{{(\w?)}}/g,item; while (item = re.exec(s)) arr.push(item[1]); –  HerrWalter Sep 14 '12 at 11:47

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

In most regex flavors, you could use lookaround assertions:

(?<={{)\w*(?=}})

Unfortunately, JavaScript doesn't support lookbehind assertions, so you can't use them.

But the regex you proposed can be used by accessing the first capturing group:

var pattern = /{{(\w*)}}/g;
var match = pattern.exec(subject);
if (match != null) {
    result = match[1];
} 
share|improve this answer

A quick and dirty solution would be /[^{]+(?=\}\})/, but it will cause a bit of a mess if the leading braces are omitted, and will also match {word1}}. If I remember correctly, JavaScript does not support look-behind, which is a bit of a shame in this case.

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Good idea. I like this. I guess the corner case {word1}} wouldn't be problematic, but only @user1671224 would be able to judge that. –  Tim Pietzcker Sep 14 '12 at 11:24
    
Agreed, it ain't problemetic but it could result in some unexpected difficulties. –  HerrWalter Sep 14 '12 at 11:47
    
Fair enough. I would probably have gone with capturing groups, too. –  skunkfrukt Sep 14 '12 at 11:56

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