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I used to use the anonymous self-execute function in js:

((function(){
  //do something
})();

However I found this somewhere:

((function(){
  //do something
}).call(this);

What is the difference?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

In the first example, this will be the global object (window in browser-land), unless you're in ES5 mode, in which it'll be undefined.

In the second example, this depends on what this was in the calling context- either global (undefined in ES5), or a object instance.

function Foo() {
    var that = this;

    (function () {
       console.log(this === window);
       console.log(this === that);
       console.log(typeof this === "undefined"); 
    }());

    (function () {
       console.log(this === window);
       console.log(this === that);
       console.log(typeof this === "undefined"); 
    }).call(this);

    (function () {
       "use strict";

       console.log(this === window);
       console.log(this === that); 
       console.log(typeof this === "undefined"); 
    }());
}

new Foo();​

[Fiddle]

You'll also find the .call() call is microscopically slower due to the extra work the engine has to do to set the this context up.

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1  
In ES5 strict mode, in the first example, this will be undefined. –  Jason Orendorff Sep 14 '12 at 11:21
    
@JasonOrendorff: Thanks, updated. –  Matt Sep 14 '12 at 11:23

One calls it in the context of the default object (window in a browser), and the other calls it in the context of whatever this is. Unless you are inside some other function, or a with block, this will be the default object, so there isn't a difference in that particular example.

The context determines what value is assigned to this inside the function.

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if you pass this, both forms are equivalent.

But to see difference, check the program below

var x = 5;
var o = { x: 10 };

function f()
{
    alert(this.x);
}

f();
f.call(o);

f() -> will alert 5.

f.call(o) -> will alert 10.

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