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Overwrite a derived function behaviour while still calling the same function of it's parent, see C::foo() for example.It still have the behaviour of A::foo but extended it. Is it too simple to be a pattern ?

class A
{
public:
    virtual ~A() {}
    virtual void foo(){ MSG("A::foo");}
};

class B : public A
{
public:
    virtual void foo(){ MSG("B::foo");}
};

class C : public B
{
public:
    virtual void foo(){ 
        A::foo(); //here still have the behaviour of A::foo but extended it
        MSG("C::foo");
    }
};

void callFoo(A* p)
{
    p->foo();
}

int main()
{
    boost::scoped_ptr<A> myPtr(new A());
    callFoo(myPtr.get());

    myPtr.reset(new B());
    callFoo(myPtr.get());

    myPtr.reset(new C());
    callFoo(myPtr.get());

    return 0;
}
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It is very, very, very, very common practice. –  PiotrNycz Sep 14 '12 at 11:31
    
It predates patterns. And it is just functional composition (meets class-responsibility). IOW, you wouldn't call a loop a pattern... –  sehe Sep 14 '12 at 11:32
4  
It's the infamous calling method of base-class pattern... –  Luchian Grigore Sep 14 '12 at 11:34
    
yes this predates pattern but since it seems common, just wondering does it have a name ? or doesn't deserve a name ... –  Gob00st Sep 14 '12 at 11:51
    
I happen to be reading GOF Design Patterns at the moment, and this gets mentioned as part of Template Method. –  BoBTFish Sep 14 '12 at 12:15
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

There's no requirement for a design element to be complicated to be called a "pattern".

However, there is a requirement that it be useful; that it makes it easier to produce correct, coherent, efficient and flexible designs. Implementing useful functionality in a base class, and then placing a burden on derived classes to remember to invoke it manually, doesn't really meet that requirement, and so I'd be tempted to label it an "anti-pattern". Adding an intermediate base class, and expecting derived class implementors to figure out which override(s) they actually want, is more along the lines of a "confusing mess".

If you want a bona fide pattern (described using capital letters in a famous book) for this situation, then the Template Method might be appropriate - the base class contains a non-virtual function which performs some common functionality, delegating part of the work to private, pure virtual functions that can be overridden. Personally, I'd go one step further and delegate to a separate class, since I like to give each class a single responsibility and avoid inheriting from anything except abstract interfaces, giving something along the lines of:

class FooInterface {
public:
    virtual ~FooInterface() {}
    virtual void foo() = 0;
};

class A {
public:
    void foo(FooInterface & impl) {
        MSG("A::foo"); // Happens whatever the implementation does
        impl.foo();
    }
};

class C : public FooInterface {
    virtual void foo() {
        // We don't have to worry about A at all
        MSG("C::foo");
    }
};
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By "Simple but useful pattern" you mean "Language feature". You can't just use a language feature once and call it a pattern. It's not a pattern. It's just you using a language feature. I mean, congratulations, I also think that using language features is an important way to go about constructing programs in a language, but, it's a long way from any pattern anything.

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2  
But I use the assignment pattern all the time where I put a type, a name, an equals sign and a value right after each other. –  Aesthete Sep 14 '12 at 11:35
2  
@Aesthete, And I use the equals sign doesn't always mean assignment pattern when I tell you the assignment operator is never called. –  chris Sep 14 '12 at 11:45
    
I know it's not GOF one & certain not any modern one, just wondering this seems quite common, do we have a name for it ? –  Gob00st Sep 14 '12 at 11:50
1  
I've a non programming related pattern abuse of buzzwords when I meet with PHB. –  AProgrammer Sep 14 '12 at 11:50
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