Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In this code block,

@@y = 1
class MyClass
 @@y = 2
end
p @@y # => 2

naively, it seems that @@y is in top-level scope, and it isn't the same @@y as the one in MyClass's scope. Why is @@y affected by the class MyClass definition? (why is the result 2?)

share|improve this question
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Let's look at this example. Here @@x in Bar is indeed separate from @@x in Foo.

class Foo
  @@x = 1
end

class Bar
  @@x = 2
end

Foo.class_variable_get(:@@x) # => 1
Bar.class_variable_get(:@@x) # => 2

But what happens if Bar is a child of Foo?

class Foo
  @@x = 1
end

class Bar < Foo
  @@x = 2
end

Foo.class_variable_get(:@@x) # => 2
Bar.class_variable_get(:@@x) # => 2

In this case, @@x is the same in both cases, and it is the one declared in Foo.

Now, back to your example:

@@y = 1
class MyClass
  @@y = 2
end
p @@y

The first line declares class variable in the root scope. Root is a special object main which is of type Object. So, essentially, you're defining a class variable on Object class. Since everything is an Object, this is how definition of MyClass also inherits @@y and is able to change it.

share|improve this answer
    
Sergio, thanks very much! That is a fine answer. Here is a corollary question: @@y = 1 class MyClass end p MyClass.class_variable_get(:@@y) p MyClass.class_variables Why doesn't #class_variables show @@y? –  sploiber Sep 14 '12 at 12:43
    
@sploiber: Because it shows only class variables that this class owns. See the documentation: Module.class_variables –  Sergio Tulentsev Sep 14 '12 at 12:50
    
Sergio, thanks very much! –  sploiber Sep 14 '12 at 12:51
    
If Bar is able to change the value of @@y in its superclass Object, why doesn't Bar change the value of @@y in its superclass Foo? –  Sébastien Le Callonnec Sep 14 '12 at 12:51
1  
@SébastienLeCallonnec: it does, look closer :) –  Sergio Tulentsev Sep 14 '12 at 12:53
show 1 more comment

When you do

@@y = 1

you are defining it on Object. Since MyClass is a subclass of Object, it has access to it's class variables.

@@y = 1
class MyClass
  @@y = 2
end
p @@y
puts MyClass.superclass #=> Object
puts Object.class_variables #=> @@y
share|improve this answer
    
I like both, actually; yours is more complete and adds a fuller picture. But all of this helped me. Thanks. –  sploiber Sep 14 '12 at 12:54
add comment

Global vars are like this:

$y = 1

and class vars are like this:

@@y = 1

So actually your using the class vars

here is a link: vars

share|improve this answer
    
There's no word "global" in the question :) –  Sergio Tulentsev Sep 14 '12 at 12:27
    
OP asked why the class vars were behaving as observed, so must have known they were class vars. The problem was not understand the nature of Ruby class var inheritance. –  Dave Newton Sep 14 '12 at 12:58
    
Dave, yes, that is right. This exchange helped me with a fuller understanding of class variables. –  sploiber Sep 14 '12 at 13:07
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.