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The standard api does not include an AtomicBitSet implementation. I could roll my own on top of AtomicIntegerArray, but would prefer not too.

Is anyone aware of an existing implementation released under a licence compatible with Apache 2? I require only basic operations to set and check bits.

Edit:

The code is both performance and memory critical so I'd like to avoid synchronization or an integer per flag if possible.

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I assume a synchronized BitSet is not an option? If you want concurrency you could have an array of say 16 of them which would allow up to 16 threads to access them at once. –  Peter Lawrey Sep 14 '12 at 12:36
    
IMHO using AtomicIntegerArray would make sense for most (?) cases. Why not use that? –  lefty Sep 14 '12 at 12:37
    
Of course, it wouldn't be extendable like BitSet. You'd need to use a read/write lock or similar. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Sep 14 '12 at 12:41
    
The code has fairly critical performance and memory requirements so I'd like to avoid using locks or an integer per flag if possible. –  henry Sep 14 '12 at 12:43

2 Answers 2

up vote 13 down vote accepted

I would use an AtomicIntegerArray and I would use 32 flags per integer which would give you the same density as BitSet but without needing locks for thread safety.

public class AtomicBitSet {
    private final AtomicIntegerArray array;

    public AtomicBitSet(int length) {
        int intLength = (length + 31) / 32;
        array = new AtomicIntegerArray(intLength);
    }

    public void set(long n) {
        int bit = 1 << n;
        int idx = (int) (n >>> 5);
        while (true) {
            int num = array.get(idx);
            int num2 = num | bit;
            if (num == num2 || array.compareAndSet(idx, num, num2))
                return;
        }
    }

    public boolean get(long n) {
        int bit = 1 << n;
        int idx = (int) (n >>> 5);
        int num = array.get(idx);
        return (num & bit) != 0;
    }
}
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If its performance critical you may want to avoid to divide and replace it by bit-shifting (>>). The JIT as of now is not able to guess that the values can be only positive and will not automagically optimize that. –  Durandal Sep 14 '12 at 14:50
    
@Durandal Good idea. Changed it so you can have 64 billion bits. –  Peter Lawrey Sep 14 '12 at 15:07
1  
@PeterLawrey Shouldn't int bit = 1 << n; be int bit = 1 << ( n % 32 ); in both get and set? –  tim_yates Feb 13 '13 at 11:23
1  
@tim_yates In Java, doing such a modulus has no effect as the shift is & 31 for int and & 63 for long. –  Peter Lawrey Feb 14 '13 at 18:15
1  
I had to develop a ThreadSafeBitSet for a project, and added few atomic methods like compareAndSet, and clearAndGetNextSetBit methods. Code is here gist.github.com/gomathi/322b8f3a3af54243383d. –  vinayag Jul 29 '14 at 23:37

Look at http://www.javamex.com/tutorials/synchronization_concurrency_7_atomic_integer_long.shtml

Not exactly using BitSet, but AtomicInteger.

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