Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I been programming Spring/Web projects for sometime using eclipse and tomcat but now that I am getting into Maven I am also thinking about using jetty for my workstation testing.

I made a sample web app and if I run it on tomcat from eclipse I goto http://localhost:8080/TestJetty/ but if I do a mvn jetty:run I have to access it from http://localhost:8080/

Why is that?

Also can I setup eclipse to run jetty? whats the pros and cons of both

share|improve this question
add comment

1 Answer

Normally with "jetty:run" goal of maven jetty plugin the context path is /, unless it is overridden with a contextPath configuration entry:

       <plugin>
            <groupId>org.mortbay.jetty</groupId>
            <artifactId>jetty-maven-plugin</artifactId>
            <version>Your version..</version>
            <configuration>
                <webApp>
                    <contextPath>/mycontextpath</contextPath>
                </webApp>
            </configuration>
        </plugin>   

From within Eclipse probably it is your project name that is being used as the context path.

Regarding pros and cons, it simply is your level of comfort, I prefer command line and so would normally run it outside of eclipse using "mvn jetty:run"

share|improve this answer
    
thanks Biju have you used it for any Spring projects. –  techsjs2012 Sep 14 '12 at 13:20
    
I tried adding your conf for the contextPath but it did not work –  techsjs2012 Sep 14 '12 at 13:24
    
Yes, without any issues - are you seeing any issues with Spring projects and jetty:run? –  Biju Kunjummen Sep 14 '12 at 13:24
    
Not sure, it could be because of the plugin version - wiki.eclipse.org/Jetty/Feature/Jetty_Maven_Plugin. This works for me perfectly –  Biju Kunjummen Sep 14 '12 at 13:27
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.