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I have a controller action that gets invoked directly, but throws this error:

The operation cannot be completed because the DbContext has been disposed.

I have only found solutions online regarding deferred excecution, but I don't think that applies here, because everywhere I use the context (in this instance) I call either .ToList() or .FirstOrDefault(). Here is my code:

CONTROLLER CONTENT

    private IUnitOfWork UnitOfWork;
    public MyFavouritesController(
        IAccountServices accountServices,
        IUnitOfWork unitOfWork
        )
    {
        AccountServices = accountServices;
        UnitOfWork = unitOfWork;
    }

    public ActionResult Index()
    {
        int? id = AccountServices.GetCurrentUserId();
        if (!id.HasValue)
        {
            return RedirectToAction("Login", "Account", new { ReturnUrl = this.HttpContext.Request.Url.AbsolutePath });
        }
        var user = UnitOfWork.UserRepo.Get(id.Value, "Favourites", "Favourites.County", "Favourites.Country");
        //THE ABOVE CALL GETS THE ERROR

        //.....
        return View();
    }

REPOSITORY BASE CLASS

public class RepositoryBase<C, T> : IDisposable
    where C:DbContext, new()
    where T : ModelBase
{
    private DbContext _context;
    public DbContext Context
    {
        get
        {
            if (_context == null)
            {
                _context = new C();
                this.AllowSerialization = true;
            }
            return _context;
        }
        set
        {
            _context = value;
        }
    }

    public virtual T Get(int Id, params string[] includes)
    {
        if (Id > 0)
        {
            var result = Context.Set<T>().Where(t => t.Id == Id);
            foreach (string includePath in includes)
            {
                result = result.Include(includePath);
            }
            return result.FirstOrDefault(); //This is where the error occurs.
        }
        else
        {
            throw new ApplicationException("Id is zero (0).");
        }
    }

    //... (More CRUD methods)

    public void Dispose()
    {
        if (Context != null)
        {
            Context.Dispose(); //Debugger never hits this before the error
        }
    }
}

UNIT OF WORK CLASS

public class UnitOfWork:IUnitOfWork
{
    public UnitOfWork(
        //... DI of all repos
        IUserRepository userRepo
        )
    {
        //... save repos to an local property
        UserRepo = userRepo;

        //create a new instance of the context so that all the repo's have access to the same DbContext
        Context = new Context();

        //assign the new context to all the repo's
        //...
        UserRepo.Context = Context;
    }

    public Context Context { get; set; }

    public IUserRepository UserRepo { get; set; }

    //... (some more repositories)

    public void Dispose()
    {
        Context.Dispose(); //THIS IS NOT HIT AT ALL
    }
}

LASTLY, THE MODEL CONTAINER HAS THIS LINE

_Instance.RegisterType<IUnitOfWork, UnitOfWork>(new PerThreadLifetimeManager());

As you can see, the index action will recieve a new instance of UnitOfWork which contains a new DbContext object. But at the first call to this context, it throws the above error. This pattern works everywhere else in my code.

Thanks

UPDATE

The answer below was to use a perRequestLifetimeManager. Here is the implimentation of one in unity:

    public class HttpRequestLifetimeManager : LifetimeManager
    {
        private string _key = Guid.NewGuid().ToString();

        public override object GetValue()
        {
            if (HttpContext.Current != null && HttpContext.Current.Items.Contains(_key))
                return HttpContext.Current.Items[_key];
            else
                return null;
        }

        public override void RemoveValue()
        {
            if (HttpContext.Current != null)
                HttpContext.Current.Items.Remove(_key);
        }

        public override void SetValue(object newValue)
        {
            if (HttpContext.Current != null)
                HttpContext.Current.Items[_key] = newValue;
        }
    }
share|improve this question
    
Why are you making things so complicated? The DbContext already is an implementation of Unit of Work and Repository. –  Kristof Claes Sep 14 '12 at 12:57
    
I'm very new to this and didn't know that. But my reasoning was that I wanted the front-end MVC app to be mostly unaware of the Dbcontext association, making it slightly more loosely coupled. That's why I wrap it all in interfaces. –  hofnarwillie Sep 14 '12 at 13:08
    
What's with the down vote? –  hofnarwillie Sep 14 '12 at 13:30
    
What IoC are you using? Have you tried changing the PerThreadLifetimeManager to something like a PerRequestLifetimeManager? –  Kristof Claes Sep 14 '12 at 14:52
    
Yeah I just did. It works perfectly. Thanks. Put it in an answer and I'll mark it. –  hofnarwillie Sep 14 '12 at 15:14

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I noticed you're using a PerThreadLifetimeManager to control the creation and disposal of your unit of work class. You should probably change it to something like PerRequestLifetimeManager if your IoC container supports that.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Kristof, that worked perfectly. Unity doesn't support a PerRequestLifetimeManager, but I found a custom implimentation of it on Stackoverflow. I've added it into my question for the benefit of future viewers. Thanks for your help. –  hofnarwillie Sep 17 '12 at 8:23

Its because your are disposing the Unit Of Work, after wich you are requesting your data, store your data in a Variable after the query then you can release the Unit Of Work instance as well.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't think I am disposing of UnitOfWork. The error occurs INSIDE unitOfWork. I call .SingleOrDefault() –  hofnarwillie Sep 14 '12 at 13:10

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