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I have a string in Ruby on which I'm calling the strip method to remove the leading and trailing whitespace. e.g.

s = "12345 "
s.strip

However if the string is empty I get the following error.

NoMethodError: undefined method `strip' for nil:NilClass

I'm using Ruby 1.9 so whats the easiest way to check if the value is nil before calling the strip method?

Update:

I tried this on an element in an array but got the same problem:

data[2][1][6].nil? ? data[2][1][6] : data[2][1][6].split(":")[1].strip
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this has been asked in one way or another dozens of times: stackoverflow.com/questions/5429790/… –  tokland Sep 14 '12 at 13:36
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note to original poster: the String is not empty as you claim, which would be s = "", it is nil. It doesn't yet exist. If it was empty you could check with: s.strip unless s.empty? –  three Sep 14 '12 at 14:08
    
If the string is empty, you wouldn't get that error. –  sawa Sep 14 '12 at 15:33
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7 Answers 7

If you don't mind the extra object being created, either of these work:

"#{s}".strip
s.to_s.strip

Without extra object:

s && s.strip
s.strip if s
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I guess the easiest method would be the following:

s.strip if s
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Not really convenient if you try to chain things. –  Victor Moroz Sep 14 '12 at 14:15
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You can use method try from ActiveSupport (Rails library)

gem install activesupport

require 'active_support/core_ext/object/try'
s.try(:strip)

or you can use my gem tryit which gives extra facilities:

gem install tryit

s.try { strip }
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Simply put:

s = s.nil? ? s : s.strip

Tl;dr Check if s is nil, then return s, otherwise, strip it.

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@lukad has a simpler answer than this even though. –  Eugene Sep 14 '12 at 13:26
    
Thanks - Just tried this on an element within an array combined with split. It still seems to fail though: . puts data[2][1][6].nil? ? data[2][1][6] : data[2][1][6].split(":")[1].strip . NoMethodError: undefined method `strip' for nil:NilClass –  user1513388 Sep 14 '12 at 13:41
    
What does data[2][1][6].split(":") return? Seems like it has only one item. –  lukad Sep 14 '12 at 13:52
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Method which works for me (I know, I should never pollute pristine Object space, but it's so convenient that I will take a risk):

class Object
  def unless_nil(default = nil, &block)
    nil? ? default : block[self]
  end
end

p "123".unless_nil(&:length) #=> 3
p nil.unless_nil("-", &:length) #=> "-"

In your particular case it could be:

data[2][1][6].unless_nil { |x| x.split(":")[1].unless_nil(&:strip) }

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ActiveSupport comes with a method for that : try. For example, an_object.try :strip will return nil if an_object is nil, but will proceed otherwise. The syntax is the same as send. Cf active_support_core_extensions.html#try.

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If you want to avoid the error that appears in the question:

s.to_s.strip
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