Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Basically I want to have access to all standard python int operators, eg __and__ and __xor__ etc, specifically whenever the result is finally printed I want it represented in Hex format. (Kind of like putting my calculator into Hex mode)

class Hex(int):
  def __repr__(self):
    return "0x%x"%self
  __str__=__repr__ # this certainly helps with printing

if __name__=="__main__":
  print Hex(0x1abe11ed) ^ Hex(440720179)
  print Hex(Hex(0x1abe11ed) ^ Hex(440720179))

Ideally BOTH line of output should be hexadecimal: 0xfacade, however the first one yields decimal: 16435934

Any ideas?

share|improve this question
1  
Why not just use the built-in function hex()? docs.python.org/library/functions.html#hex –  Adam Rosenfield Aug 7 '09 at 2:38
1  
Inserting hex() in the numerous the various appropriate places would be time consuming and imprecise. Switching the representation for anything of type Hex(int) would be a simple refactor. However: I'm thinking one need's to overload all the Hex/int dyadic operators to return a Hex result also (currently they still yield int). Maybe there a "Mixin" for overloading operators in bulk. –  user152191 Aug 7 '09 at 3:12
add comment

5 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

In response to your comment:

You could write a Mixin by yourself:

class IntMathMixin:
    def __add__(self, other):
        return type(self)(int(self).__add__(int(other)))
    # ... analog for the others

Then use it like this:

class Hex(IntMathMixin, int):
    def __repr__(self):
         return "0x%x"%self
    __str__=__repr__
share|improve this answer
    
Why was the mixin solution preferred over a simple subclassing as per @Greg Hewgill's answer? –  Matt Joiner Feb 19 '11 at 14:39
add comment

You should define __repr__ and __str__ separately:

class Hex(int):
  def __repr__(self):
    return "Hex(0x%x)" % self
  def __str__(self):
    return "0x%x" % self

The __repr__ function should (if possible) provide Python text that can be eval()uated to reconstruct the original object. On the other hand, __str__ can just return a human readable representation of the object.

share|improve this answer
    
Cheers for noting the distinction between str and repr. –  user152191 Aug 7 '09 at 3:21
1  
As repr(23) and str(23) give exactly the same result string, I wouldn't get particularly hot and bothered about a subclass of int also doing that -- after all if Hex is in a module you never know whether to return 'Hex(0x0)' or 'themodule.Hex(0x0)' (as you don't know how the import was expressed!) so the eval-ability of the string is pretty iffy anyway (__import__('themodule').Hex(0x0) is more widely eval'able, for modules not in subpackages, but if I saw THAT returned from __repr__ in a code review I'd veto submitting the changeset!-). –  Alex Martelli Aug 7 '09 at 5:40
    
I consider __repr__ sort of a best-effort thing really. Obviously it can't do the right thing in all cases. –  Greg Hewgill Aug 7 '09 at 6:40
    
The "best" effort (in order to be most likely eval'able) would be the above string with __import__, and I'd just hate to see that -- so "not quite best" is better. And since containers' __str__ uses __repr__ on the items, I'm leaning towards de-emphasizing the distinction. –  Alex Martelli Aug 7 '09 at 15:52
add comment

A class decorator, especially in Python 2.6 and beyond, is the handiest way to wrap a lot of methods to "return an instance of this class's type rather than an instance of the superclass", which, as other have indicated, is your underlying issue (beyond quibbles with __str__ vs __repr__, worthwhile but not at all resolutory for your problem;-).

def returnthisclassfrom(specials):
  specialnames = ['__%s__' % s for s in specials.split()]
  def wrapit(cls, method):
    return lambda *a: cls(method(*a))
  def dowrap(cls):
    for n in specialnames:
      method = getattr(cls, n)
      setattr(cls, n, wrapit(cls, method))
    return cls
  return dowrap

@returnthisclassfrom('and or xor')
class Hex(int):
  def __repr__(self): return hex(self)
  __str__ = __repr__

a = Hex(2345)
b = Hex(5432)
print a, b, a^b

In Python 2.6, this emits

0x929 0x1538 0x1c11

as desired. Of course you can add more methodnames to the decorator, etc; if you're stuck with Python 2.5, remove the decorating line (the one starting with @) and use instead

class Hex(int):
  def __repr__(self): return hex(self)
  __str__ = __repr__
Hex = returnthisclassfrom('and or xor')(Hex)

a mite less elegant, but just as effective;-)

Edit: fixed an occurence of "the usual scoping issue" in the code.

share|improve this answer
    
+1. I knew there must be a simpler solution. But I wasn't aware one can use decorators on classes. Thx. –  Ralph Aug 7 '09 at 6:01
    
@Ralph, you're welcome! decorator syntax is only supported since python 2.6, but I also showed how a decorator (with less elegant syntax) can be used on a class in older python (e.g. 2.5, with which you're stuck in google app engine for example, or as the system-supplied Python with MacOSX and many Linux distros, etc;-). –  Alex Martelli Aug 7 '09 at 6:18
    
There's something wrong with this (at least on Python 2.5) where the last method name in specials is used for all preceding methods too, e.g. print a, b, a&b, a|b, a^b >>> 0x929 0x1538 0x1c11 0x1c11 0x1c11, but it should be 0x929 0x1538 0x128 0x1d39 0x1c11. –  mhawke Aug 7 '09 at 6:25
    
Yeah, the problem is with the lambda using the last bound value of method when executed, so it will always use the last method in the specials list. –  mhawke Aug 7 '09 at 6:46
    
Oops, the usual scoping issue, let me edit to fix! –  Alex Martelli Aug 7 '09 at 15:46
show 2 more comments

You'll need to get the operators (+, -, ** etc) to return instances of Hex. As is, it will return ints, i.e.

class Hex(int):
    def __repr__(self):
        return "Hex(0x%x)" % self
    def __str__(self):
        return "0x%x" % self
>>> h1 = Hex(100)
>>> h2 = Hex(1000)
>>> h1
Hex(0x64)
>>> h2
Hex(0x3e8)
>>> h1+h2
1100
>>> type(h1+h2)
<type 'int'>

So, you can override the various operators:

class Hex(int):
    def __repr__(self):
        return "Hex(0x%x)" % self
    def __str__(self):
        return "0x%x" % self
    def __add__(self, other):
        return Hex(super(Hex, self).__add__(other))
    def __sub__(self, other):
        return self.__add__(-other)
    def __pow__(self, power):
        return Hex(super(Hex, self).__pow__(power))
    def __xor__(self, other):
        return Hex(super(Hex, self).__xor__(other))

>>> h1 = Hex(100)
>>> h2 = Hex(1000)
>>> h1+h2
Hex(0x44c)
>>> type(h1+h2)
<class '__main__.Hex'>
>>> h1 += h2
>>> h1
Hex(0x44c)
>>> h2 ** 2
Hex(0xf4240)
>>> Hex(0x1abe11ed) ^ Hex(440720179)
>>> Hex(0xfacade)

I don't know about this, I feel that there must be a better way without having to override every operator to return an instance of Hex???

share|improve this answer
add comment

Override __str__ as well.

__repr__ is used when repr(o) is called, and to display a value at the interactive prompt. __str__ is called for most instances of stringifying an object, including when it is printed.

The default __str__ behavior for an object is to fall back to the repr, but int provides its own __str__ method (which is identical to __repr__ (before Python 3), but does not fall back to __repr__).

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.