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I'm experiencing a weird problem related to my haversine formula. The way it takes places in my application is;

select lat,long,distance from(
        select lat,long,( 6371 * acos( cos( radians("+testLatitude.to_s+") ) * cos( radians( lat ) ) * cos( radians( long ) - radians("+testLongitude.to_s+") ) + sin( radians("+testLatitude.to_s+") ) * sin( radians( lat ) ) ) ) as distance
        from available_people) as dt where distance < "+distance.to_s+" order by distance

I am 100% sure that I have a personName in my available_people table but I cannot get the query below to work. It gives me column doesn't exist error.

select lat,long,distance from(
            select personName,lat,long,( 6371 * acos( cos( radians("+testLatitude.to_s+") ) * 

    cos( radians( lat ) ) * cos( radians( long ) - radians("+testLongitude.to_s+") ) + sin( radians("+testLatitude.to_s+") ) * sin( radians( lat ) ) ) ) as distance
                from available_people) as dt where distance < "+distance.to_s+" order by distance

What could be the possible reason. Would I be able to retrieve the personName column as well as the lat,long information?

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1 Answer 1

Without seeing the exact error (you really should include it) I'd say you should prefix personName with the table i.e. available_people.personName or dt.personName (if I'm reading your query correctly).

Second, albeit unrelated, what column type are you using for your lat/lng columns? Is this using mysql? As floats?

If that's the case, then you will run into crippling performance issues once your table holds enough records. I've run into this problem with ~50k records, where queries were taking 2 minutes or more.

If you're working with geospatial data, consider using Postgres+PostGIS or MongoDB. These solutions have geospatial indexing to make your queries ultra fast and functions so that you won't have to do haversine or spherical law of cosines stuff yourself.

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