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Users can basically add other user(s) as a friend. So, I am not creating another user resource but linking two resources.

Questions

  1. What is the best strategy to handle this?
  2. What is the appropriate Verb for this case?

I heard there is a LINK verb, which seems to be appropriate.

And also I read, I can use PATCH verb to apply patch on resource(s).
If so, can I do like this

PATCH /users/{id}/friends
share|improve this question
    
Why not just PUT with the new friend appended to the user's friend list? –  pdoherty926 Sep 14 '12 at 14:22
    
PUT is used when we try to Update a resource in REST. But what I am looking for is linking two resources. –  Venu Sep 14 '12 at 14:27

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You might consider creating a new object.

If you separated out a friendship object, you would be able to create and modify them without updating the User(s). Each friendship would have two user keys. It would also be a great place to hang extra information about the friendship, such as 'friends since' value.

POST /friendships

{
     primaryUser: 43,
     secondaryUser: 3
     since: "03/16/2010"
}

201 CREATED
location: /friendships/635

Then a query to user 43 could be written to include an array of either user ids, friendship ids, or embedded objects.

GET /users/43

200 SUCCESS
{
    id: 43,
    name: "john",
    friends: [3]
}

Or

200 SUCCESS
{
    id: 43,
    name: "john",
    friends: [635]
}

or

200 SUCCESS
{
    id: 43,
    name: "john",
    friends: [
        {
             id: 635,
             primaryUser: 43,
             secondaryUser: 3,
             since: "03/16/2010"
        }
    ]
}

Semantics for updating/removing are much more straight forward. 'Removing' a friendship looks better as a DELETE rather than a PATCH or PUT imo.

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"Linking a resource" really just means "update one resource to include a link to another".

That means that you should issue a PUT or POST to resource A with a new representation that includes the new reference to resource B.

If it's a bi-directional relationship then by virtue of making that PUT/POST on resource A you should also see the reference to A included the next time you GET resource B, too.

share|improve this answer
    
I agree about using PUT or POST. But what about this, FYI: rfc-ref.org/RFC-TEXTS/1945/chapter20.html –  Venu Sep 14 '12 at 15:01
    
Hey look at that, never noticed it before. Well, it sounds appropriate alright, but I'd be wary of server/proxy support for it. It's likely even less available than PATCH, another useful verb for RESTful interactions. –  Brian Kelly Sep 14 '12 at 16:00

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