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I've got a class, memberlist, that contains a std::list of class memberinfo. These represents the peers on a network.

I use the class to add some functionality to the list.

I want to expose some iterators (begin and end) so that outside code can loop through my internal list and read their data. However, I want to have two ways of doing this - one that includes an element for the localhost, and one that doesn't.

What's a good way to do this?

I could put the local node first, then have like begin(showlocal=false) just give the second element instead of the first. Or someone suggested storing a pair of with the bool saying if it's local or not.

Any suggestions on a good way to do this? I'm not too great on advanced STL stuff yet.

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1  
Your first solution seems appropriate (returning an iterator to the first element in one case, to the second in the other case). It may not be the clearest approach, but it has the advantage of being simple. If you go that way, I think some comments explaining what is going on would be welcomed (make it clear that the first element will always correspond to the localhost, and correctly document the begin member function). –  Luc Touraille Sep 14 '12 at 15:34

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Personally I would approach this in a different way and have your memberinfo have a way of telling you if it's local or not.

That way you're not specialising your collection class due to a specialisation of the contained objects. In fact you could just use a standard std::list<memberinfo>.

E.g.

class memberinfo
{
    bool IsLocal( ) const;
}

Then you would choose whether you're interested in local members or not while you're iterating through the contained objects.

E.g.

std::list<memberinfo>::iterator it;
std::list<memberinfo> list;

for ( it = list.begin() ; it != list.end() ; it++ )
{
    if ( it->IsLocal() )
    { 
        // blah blah blah
    }
    else
    {
        // dum dee dum dee
    }
}
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If I understand correctly, the OP wants to treat all members identically, but sometimes include a particular member (corresponding to localhost) and sometimes leave it aside. I don't think the solution you propose is really adequate for this purpose. Moreover, it does not fit very well in the iterator-based design of standard algorithms: to include or exclude the local member from some computations, you would need some kind of filtering iterator that tests whether the current member is local or not. [...] –  Luc Touraille Sep 14 '12 at 20:08
    
[...] Note however that this can be done quite nicely with Boost.filter_iterator and lambdas (or std::bind): auto it = boost::make_filter_iterator([](MemberInfo const & mi) { return !mi.IsLocal(); }, list.begin(), list.end());. –  Luc Touraille Sep 14 '12 at 20:12
    
I guess it comes down to the interpretation of the O.P.'s question. I tend to design my software around what is applicable to the problem at hand rather than to fit in with an xyz-based design principle. –  Nick Sep 17 '12 at 7:13

As I said in comment to your question, I think your first solution is reasonable. However, I'm not sure that giving a parameter to begin is the best approach for discriminating the two cases. The major problem with this is that you cannot use your full collection (including the localhost member) as a range, meaning that you cannot use Boost.Range algorithms or the C++11 range-based for loop.

A simple solution would be to have two different member functions returning the appropriate range, as a pair of iterators. Boost.Range provides a sub_range class, which seems rather appropriate (you want to return a sub-range of the list of members). Here is a sample code using this approach:

#include <boost/range.hpp>

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <vector>

struct MemberInfo
{
    std::string name;
};

class MemberList
{
  public:

    typedef std::vector<MemberInfo>::iterator iterator;
    typedef std::vector<MemberInfo>::const_iterator const_iterator;

    MemberList() 
      : members_{MemberInfo{"local"}, MemberInfo{"foo"}, MemberInfo{"bar"}}
    {}

    boost::sub_range<std::vector<MemberInfo>> all() // includes localhost
    {
        return boost::sub_range<std::vector<MemberInfo>>(
            members_.begin(), members_.end());
    }

    boost::sub_range<std::vector<MemberInfo> const> all() const
    {
        return boost::sub_range<std::vector<MemberInfo> const>(
            members_.begin(), members_.end());
    }

    boost::sub_range<std::vector<MemberInfo>> some() // excludes localhost
    {
        return boost::sub_range<std::vector<MemberInfo>>(
            ++members_.begin(), members_.end());
    }

    boost::sub_range<std::vector<MemberInfo> const> some() const
    {
        return boost::sub_range<std::vector<MemberInfo> const>(
            ++members_.begin(), members_.end());
    }

  private:

    std::vector<MemberInfo> members_;
};

Now, you can use either all() or some() depending on whether you want to include local or not, and both can be used as ranges:

int main()
{
    MemberList ml;

    for (MemberInfo mi : ml.all()) { std::cout << mi.name << '\n'; }

    for (MemberInfo mi : ml.some()) { std::cout << mi.name << '\n'; }
}

And of course, you can still use iterators as usual:

std::find_if(ml.all().begin(), ml.all().end(), ...);

If you don't want to leak the fact that your members are stored in a std::vector, you can use any_range, which erases the underlying iterator type.

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