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This is a continuation of my last question. (thanks for the answer)

Im using an onclick to increase and right click to decrease on 'var b' this also causing 'var max' to increase/decrease aswell but opposite (increase 'var b', decreases 'var max')

i have 2 problems:

1) when 'var b' is increased to its max of 10 then 'var max' is decreased to 40 but im able to still decrease 'var max' when clicking 'var b', 'var b' itself doesnt increase though.

2) possibly the same fix as 1 but, when 'var max' is any number below its max of 50, decreasing 'var b' or 'var c' when they are on their min of 0 'var max' is increased'

So i guess my question is how to stop a function from working when they are at their min/max, but still continue to work when changed.

My functions:

var max=50;
function decrease(){
  max = Math.max(max-1,0);
  document.getElementById('boldstuff').innerHTML = max;
  if(max < 1){
    alert("There are no more skill points to be spent.");
  }
}
function increase(){
  max = Math.min(max+1,50);
  document.getElementById('boldstuff').innerHTML = max;
}

var b=0;
function increase1(){
  b = Math.min(b+1,10);
  document.getElementById('boldstuff2').innerHTML = +b;
  if(b > 9){
    alert("You have spent all the points you can in this skill.");
  }
}
function decrease1(){
  b = Math.max(b-1,0);
  document.getElementById('boldstuff2').innerHTML = +b;
}


var c=0;
function increase2(){
  c = Math.min(c+1,10);
  document.getElementById('boldstuff3').innerHTML = +c;
  if(c > 9){
    alert("You have spent all the points you can in this skill.");
  }
}
function decrease2(){
  c = Math.max(c-1,0);
  document.getElementById('boldstuff3').innerHTML = +c;
}

My buttons:

 <div id='rem'>Remaining Skill Points: <b id="boldstuff">50</b></div>

 <div id='skill1'><input type="submit" class="skillbutton" onclick="decrease();increase1();" oncontextmenu="increase();decrease1();return false;"></div>
 <div id='counter1'><b id="boldstuff2">0</b></div>
 <div id='skill2'><input type="submit" class="skillbutton" onclick="decrease();increase2();" oncontextmenu="increase();decrease2();return false;"></div>
 <div id='counter2'><b id="boldstuff3">0</b></div>
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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

There's a lot of room for improvement here. But I think your main concern is that you're a little confused about the purpose of Math.min() and Math.max(). These aren't really meant to be used as limiters (though they can be useful in the creation of limiters). Instead, you're probably looking to just do some comparisons, like so:

var max=50;
function decrease() { 
    if(max > 0) {
        max--; 
        document.getElementById('boldstuff').innerHTML = max;
    } else {
        alert("There are no more skill points to be spent.");
    }
}

function increase() {
    if(max < 50)
        max++; 
        document.getElementById('boldstuff').innerHTML = max;
    }
}

However, I think maybe you'd be better off taking a more object oriented approach to the problem. Because otherwise you're probably just going to have issue after issue as you try to squash little bugs with little band-aids. Consider the following "enhanced" version of your code:

var SkillManager = (function() {
    var max = 50,
        skills = {
            skill1: {
                cur: 0,
                max: 10
            },
            skill2: {
                cur: 0,
                max: 10
            }
        },
        totalUsed = 0;

    var increase = function(skill) {
        if (totalUsed < max && skills[skill].cur < skills[skill].max) {
            skills[skill].cur++;
            totalUsed++;
            updateDisplay(skill, skills[skill].cur, max - totalUsed);
        } else if(skills[skill].cur === skills[skill].max) {
            alert("You have maxed out that skill!");
        } else {
            alert("You have used all your skill points!");
        }
    };

    var decrease = function(skill) {
        if (skills[skill].cur > 0) {
            skills[skill].cur--;
            totalUsed--;
            updateDisplay(skill, skills[skill].cur, max - totalUsed);
        } else {
            alert("You can't decrease a skill with 0 points in it!");
        }
    };

    var updateDisplay = function(skill, value, totalRemaining) {
        document.getElementById(skill + "counter").innerText = value;
        document.getElementById("remainingPoints").innerText = totalRemaining;
    };

    return {
        decrease: decrease,
        increase: increase
    };
}());​

With the (slightly modified) markup of:

<div id='rem'>Remaining Skill Points: <b id="remainingPoints">50</b></div>

<div id='skill1'>
     <input type="button" class="skillbutton" onclick="SkillManager.increase('skill1')" oncontextmenu="SkillManager.decrease('skill1'); return false;" value="S1" />
</div>
<div id='skill1counter' style="font-weight: bold">0</div>
<div id='skill2'>
    <input type="button" class="skillbutton" onclick="SkillManager.increase('skill2')" oncontextmenu="SkillManager.decrease('skill2'); return false;" value="S2" />
</div>
<div id='skill2counter' style="font-weight: bold">0</div>​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​

This setup is a little more code, but as you add skills, you'll notice the amount of code you must add per skill goes way down (at this point, it's about 2 lines of code per skill). Also, there is lots of room for expansion, such as managing skill names and offering more meta-data through the skills object. When it comes down to it, it's more efficient, less bug prone, and far easier to maintain and expand.

You can see it in action here:

http://jsfiddle.net/uFrPQ/

PS - You might consider adding a DOM-abstraction library like jQuery. It will allow you to pull your events handlers out of your mark-up while maintaining browser compatibility.

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I'm going to expand my answer a bit. Give me a few minutes. –  Pete Sep 14 '12 at 15:02
    
Thanks for the amazing help :D –  zhaobaloth Sep 14 '12 at 15:33
    
@zhaobaloth Not a problem, it was fun. You seem to be pretty new to JavaScript and I know it can be intimidating and tricky (largely because JavaScript is so powerful there are 100 ways to do things "wrong" and no obvious penalty for 90 of them). I recommend you check out Doug Crockford's lectures on JavaScript (google them), they're amazing and will do a lot to show you why you should do some things and shouldn't do others. I appreciate your interest in the language and your project seems like a lot of fun. Keep up the good work and keep at it! –  Pete Sep 14 '12 at 15:38

instead of having seperate increase and decrease statements for max, it might be better off to include that logic into the other two functions, using conditional statements like your alerts to determine whether to change max.

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