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Wrote a simple test:

#include <iostream>
#include <boost/thread.hpp>

using namespace std;

void myThreadRun() {
    cout << "Thread id: " << boost::this_thread::get_id() << "\n";
}

int main() {
    for (int i = 0; i < 10000; i++) {
        boost::thread t(myThreadRun);

        t.join();
    }

    return 0;
}

on which Valgrind Massif shows the following graph:

Valgrind Massif profiling result for the above example

(The stack profiling was enabled. Platform: Linux Ubuntu x86).

This program does not actually seem to have memory leaks: the memory usage is stable.

I wonder: is it a problem of Valgrind or boost::thread? Or maybe I misinterpret something?

How would you explain that?

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2  
Do you see the same thing without any std::cout in the thread code? –  James Sep 14 '12 at 15:12
2  
Oh, also, might be this: stackoverflow.com/questions/6321602/boost-thread-leakage-c –  James Sep 14 '12 at 15:14
    
Valgrind might replace the thread handling, so this particular data may not actually represent the real program profile. –  Kerrek SB Sep 14 '12 at 15:14
    
Removing std::cout does not change anything. –  weekens Sep 25 '12 at 7:07
    
I have reproduced this and tried several things to try to fix or at least alter this behavior, with no luck yet. I'm still wondering if valgrind is doing something weird behind the scenes. –  CaptainMurphy Oct 5 '12 at 14:44
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2 Answers

This isn't boost::threads, it happens with just plain pthreads too. I grabbed the sample program from here (Pthread Creation and Termination), upped the thread count to 1000 and compiled as plain C, and I see the same behavior when processing it with massif. So either it's something in pthreads or something valgrind/massif is doing.

EDIT: used program (Pthread Joining) as well. See second graph.

Creation and Termination:

    KB
547.6^                                                                       #
     |                                                                    @@@#
     |                                                                @@@@@@@#
     |                                                             @@@@@@@@@@#
     |                                                          @@@@@@@@@@@@@#
     |                                                      ::::@@@@@@@@@@@@@#
     |                                                  ::::: ::@@@@@@@@@@@@@#
     |                                               @@@::::: ::@@@@@@@@@@@@@#
     |                                           @@@@@@@::::: ::@@@@@@@@@@@@@#
     |                                        @@@@@@@@@@::::: ::@@@@@@@@@@@@@#
     |                                     @@@@@@@@@@@@@::::: ::@@@@@@@@@@@@@#
     |                                @@@@@@@ @@@@@@@@@@::::: ::@@@@@@@@@@@@@#
     |                            @@@@@ @@ @@ @@@@@@@@@@::::: ::@@@@@@@@@@@@@#
     |                         @@@@@ @@ @@ @@ @@@@@@@@@@::::: ::@@@@@@@@@@@@@#
     |                     ::@@@@@@@ @@ @@ @@ @@@@@@@@@@::::: ::@@@@@@@@@@@@@#
     |                  @@@::@ @@@@@ @@ @@ @@ @@@@@@@@@@::::: ::@@@@@@@@@@@@@#
     |               @@@@ @::@ @@@@@ @@ @@ @@ @@@@@@@@@@::::: ::@@@@@@@@@@@@@#
     |           @@@@@@ @ @::@ @@@@@ @@ @@ @@ @@@@@@@@@@::::: ::@@@@@@@@@@@@@#
     |      :::::@@@ @@ @ @::@ @@@@@ @@ @@ @@ @@@@@@@@@@::::: ::@@@@@@@@@@@@@#
     |   :@@: :: @@@ @@ @ @::@ @@@@@ @@ @@ @@ @@@@@@@@@@::::: ::@@@@@@@@@@@@@#
   0 +----------------------------------------------------------------------->Mi
     0                                                                   13.22

Pthread joining, minus the math busy work:

    KB
548.8^                                                             #
     |                                                           @@#::
     |                                                        :::@@#::
     |                                                     ::::::@@#:::
     |                                                  ::::: :::@@#:::::
     |                                              @@@@::::: :::@@#:::::
     |                                            @@@@@ ::::: :::@@#:::::::
     |                                        :@@:@@@@@ ::::: :::@@#:::::::@
     |                                     @@@:@ :@@@@@ ::::: :::@@#:::::::@
     |                                  :::@ @:@ :@@@@@ ::::: :::@@#:::::::@::
     |                               @@@:: @ @:@ :@@@@@ ::::: :::@@#:::::::@::
     |                            @@:@ @:: @ @:@ :@@@@@ ::::: :::@@#:::::::@::
     |                        @:::@@:@ @:: @ @:@ :@@@@@ ::::: :::@@#:::::::@::
     |                     ::@@:: @@:@ @:: @ @:@ :@@@@@ ::::: :::@@#:::::::@::
     |                  ::@: @@:: @@:@ @:: @ @:@ :@@@@@ ::::: :::@@#:::::::@::
     |               :@@::@: @@:: @@:@ @:: @ @:@ :@@@@@ ::::: :::@@#:::::::@::
     |            @@@:@ ::@: @@:: @@:@ @:: @ @:@ :@@@@@ ::::: :::@@#:::::::@::
     |         @@@@@ :@ ::@: @@:: @@:@ @:: @ @:@ :@@@@@ ::::: :::@@#:::::::@::
     |     @@@:@@@@@ :@ ::@: @@:: @@:@ @:: @ @:@ :@@@@@ ::::: :::@@#:::::::@::
     |   @@@@ :@@@@@ :@ ::@: @@:: @@:@ @:: @ @:@ :@@@@@ ::::: :::@@#:::::::@::
   0 +----------------------------------------------------------------------->Mi
     0                                                                   19.14

It looks like joining should eventually bring the stack size back down, even under valgrind.

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1  
That example program neither detaches nor joins its threads, so it should leak. His program joins its threads, so it shouldn't. There is no sense comparing the two. –  David Schwartz Oct 6 '12 at 22:23
    
Don't you find it interesting, then, that the behavior is so similar? –  CaptainMurphy Oct 7 '12 at 20:57
    
Yeah, now that you fixed your bug. :) –  David Schwartz Oct 7 '12 at 22:21
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Your code doesn't give the cleanups a chance to happen. When you call join on a thread, it waits until the thread signals completion, not the actual release of all of its resources. If you create the threads more slowly or put a delay or yield in your loop, the "leak" will go away.

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Added boost::this_thread::sleep(boost::posix_time::milliseconds(10)) into the loop and boost::this_thread::sleep(boost::posix_time::seconds(20)) after the loop (before program exit). The chart stays completely the same. –  weekens Sep 25 '12 at 7:23
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