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Question 1:

Can we use Mixin pattern of Mootools in the development of Windows 8 Metro style app? In other words, can we override/substitute/extend WinJS.Class with Mootool's class?

Question 2:

For example, in Mootools if we have a base class Human:

var Human = new Class({
    initialize: function(name, age) {
        this.name = name;
        this.age = age;
    },
    isAlive: true,
    energy: 1,
    eat: function() {
        this.energy = this.energy + 1; //same as this.energy++
    }
});

(using Mixin) an interface class Warrior:

var Warrior = new Class({
    energy: 100,
    kills: 0,
    attack: function(target) {
        target.isAlive = false;
        this.energy = this.energy - 5;
        this.kills++;
    }
});

and a derived / concrete class Ninja:

var Ninja = new Class({
    Extends: Human,
    Implements: Warrior,
    initialize: function(name, age, side) {
        this.side = side;
        this.parent(name, age);
    }
});



How would we say this in WinJS accent using WinJS.Class.define, WinJS.Class.derive and WinJS.Class.mix?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you want to use MooTools in your WinJS app, it should just work for the most part. There may be some warnings at startup, but as long as it doesn't violate the security framework for dynamically generated content, MooTools itself should just work. I wouldn't try to splice MooTools' code into WinJS, just use it as is.

WinJS.Class methods are, just like MooTools, defining JavaScript prototypes under the hood. "Types" you define should work together regardless of if you used MooTools or WinJS.

As far as your second question, I think you can do everything you need with just WinJS, the syntax is just different.

Defining your "human" constructor is straightforward:

var Human = WinJS.Class.define(
    function(name, age) {
        this.name = name;
        this.age = age;
    },
    {
        isAlive: true,
        energy: 1,
        eat: function() {
            this.energy = this.energy + 1;
        }
    }
);

A mixin is defined simply as an object:

var Warrior = {
    energy: 100,
    kills: 0,
    attack: function(target) {
        target.isAlive = false;
        this.energy = this.energy - 5;
        this.kills++;
    }
};

To do a derivation, you can use WinJS.Class.derive. This only gives you the inheritance part:

var Ninja = WinJS.Class.derive(Human,
    function(name, age, side) {
        this.side = side;
        Human.call(this, name, age);
    }
);

Then you do the mixin via WinJS.Class.mix:

WinJS.Class.mix(Ninja, Warrior);

And you should be all set to do:

var clyde = new Ninja("Clyde", "12", "confused");
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for the way how clyde the "confused" Ninja is instantiated. Great answer! Syntactically, calling parent (or super) would make sense in the derived class. But calling the call method is also practical if we can identify caller in the base class. For polymorphism purpose, is it possible in base class to know the caller (both in Mootools and WinJS)? Something like alert(e.name) in Human::eat function.. –  vulcan raven Sep 18 '12 at 17:08
    
In earlier versions of WinJS, there was a super property that pointed to your "base class", but we found a nasty infinite loop possibility and no way to fix it in the time remaining. Since inheritance hierarchies are fairly rare in JavaScript, we decided to remove super. For those who need it, you can call the base class constructor explicitly (as I did with the call to Human). –  Chris Tavares Sep 18 '12 at 17:13
    
I'm not sure what you mean by "know the caller"? The this reference still points to your object's state, so anything set there is still available. I don't know MooTools so can't comment on what's possible with that toolkit. –  Chris Tavares Sep 18 '12 at 17:14

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