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Provided items is the result of q LINQ expression:

var items = from item in ItemsSource.RetrieveItems()
            where ...

Suppose generation of each item takes some non-negligeble time.

Two modes of operation are possible:

  1. Using foreach would allow to start working with items in the beginning of the collection much sooner than whose in the end become available. However if we wanted to later process the same collection again, we'll have to copy save it:

    var storedItems = new List<Item>();
    foreach(var item in items){
        Process(item);
        storedItems .Add(item);
    }
    
    // Later
    foreach(var item in storedItems){
        ProcessMore(item);
    }
    

    Because if we'd just made foreach(... in items) then temsSource.RetrieveItems() would get called again.

  2. We could use .ToList() right upfront, but that would force us wait for the last item to be retrieved before we could start processing the first one.

Question: Is there an IEnumerable implementation that would iterate first time like regular LINQ query result, but would materialize in process so that second foreach would iterate over stored values?

share|improve this question
    
How hard could it be to write a CachingEnumerable/CachingEnumerator implementation that takes in the original IEnumerable and the enumerator would cycle over the cache and then pull additional values from the original until done, caching as it goes thru it? But no, I'm not aware of any framework implementation that does this. –  Rich Sep 14 '12 at 15:05
    
@Rich: Probably not too hard, just wanted to check if there is one already. –  zzandy Sep 14 '12 at 15:07
    
Well, the problem is that foreach actually works with it's own IEnumerator and that IEnumerator has it's own state. Sure, you could wrap an IQueryable or an IEnumerable in something that caches; but, you'd have to deal with the possibility of two IEnumerators enumerating concurrently and at different rates. –  Peter Ritchie Sep 14 '12 at 21:18
    
This is the typical case where I would have stopped using LINQ in favor of a standard loop :) The challenge is very insterresting anyway. –  Larry Sep 17 '12 at 9:39

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

A fun challenge so I have to provide my own solution. So fun in fact that my solution now is in version 3. Version 2 was a simplification I made based on feedback from Servy. I then realized that my solution had huge drawback. If the first enumeration of the cached enumerable didn't complete no caching would be done. Many LINQ extensions like First and Take will only enumerate enough of the enumerable to get the job done and I had to update to version 3 to make this work with caching.

The question is about subsequent enumerations of the enumerable which does not involve concurrent access. Nevertheless I have decided to make my solution thread safe. It adds some complexity and a bit of overhead but should allow the solution to be used in all scenarios.

public static class EnumerableExtensions {

  public static IEnumerable<T> Cached<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source) {
    if (source == null)
      throw new ArgumentNullException("source");
    return new CachedEnumerable<T>(source);
  }

}

class CachedEnumerable<T> : IEnumerable<T> {

  readonly Object gate = new Object();

  readonly IEnumerable<T> source;

  readonly List<T> cache = new List<T>();

  IEnumerator<T> enumerator;

  bool isCacheComplete;

  public CachedEnumerable(IEnumerable<T> source) {
    this.source = source;
  }

  public IEnumerator<T> GetEnumerator() {
    lock (this.gate) {
      if (this.isCacheComplete)
        return this.cache.GetEnumerator();
      if (this.enumerator == null)
        this.enumerator = source.GetEnumerator();
    }
    return GetCacheBuildingEnumerator();
  }

  public IEnumerator<T> GetCacheBuildingEnumerator() {
    var index = 0;
    T item;
    while (TryGetItem(index, out item)) {
      yield return item;
      index += 1;
    }
  }

  bool TryGetItem(Int32 index, out T item) {
    lock (this.gate) {
      if (!IsItemInCache(index)) {
        // The iteration may have completed while waiting for the lock.
        if (this.isCacheComplete) {
          item = default(T);
          return false;
        }
        if (!this.enumerator.MoveNext()) {
          item = default(T);
          this.isCacheComplete = true;
          this.enumerator.Dispose();
          return false;
        }
        this.cache.Add(this.enumerator.Current);
      }
      item = this.cache[index];
      return true;
    }
  }

  bool IsItemInCache(Int32 index) {
    return index < this.cache.Count;
  }

  IEnumerator IEnumerable.GetEnumerator() {
    return GetEnumerator();
  }

}

The extension is used like this (sequence is an IEnumerable<T>):

var cachedSequence = sequence.Cached();

// Pulling 2 items from the sequence.
foreach (var item in cachedSequence.Take(2))
  // ...

// Pulling 2 items from the cache and the rest from the source.
foreach (var item in cachedSequence)
  // ...

// Pulling all items from the cache.
foreach (var item in cachedSequence)
  // ...

There is slight leak if only part of the enumerable is enumerated (e.g. cachedSequence.Take(2).ToList(). The enumerator that is used by ToList will be disposed but the underlying source enumerator is not disposed. This is because the first 2 items are cached and the source enumerator is kept alive should requests for subsequent items be made. In that case the source enumerator is only cleaned up when eligigble for garbage Collection (which will be the same time as the possibly large cache).

share|improve this answer
    
This would be much shorter/simpler if you used an iterator block to implement the IEnumerator. It would get rid of a lot of that boilerplate code. –  Servy Sep 14 '12 at 17:57
    
@Servy: I have updated the code based on your input and I think it is a nice simplification. –  Martin Liversage Sep 14 '12 at 19:46
    
It looks much nicer. Now you just need to allow for multithreaded (cached) iteration like my answer ;) –  Servy Sep 14 '12 at 19:51
    
@Servy: As I see it multi-threading is a completely different problem which requires a different solution (which you seem to have provided). My solution solves the problem where you want to call ToList to avoid reiterating the enumerable but you still want the laziness of IEnumerable<T>. –  Martin Liversage Sep 14 '12 at 19:56
2  
Abandoning IDisposable objects is icky, though I guess since there's no telling whether there are ever going to be future calls to GetEnumerator there's probably no good way to know when the enumerator may be safely disposed. Too bad there's no concept of a disposable enumerable. –  supercat Sep 14 '12 at 21:55

Take a look at the Reactive Extentsions library - there is a MemoizeAll() extension which will cache the items in your IEnumerable once they're accessed, and store them for future accesses.

See this blog post by Bart De Smet for a good read on MemoizeAll and other Rx methods.

Edit: This is actually found in the separate Interactive Extensions package now - available from NuGet or Microsoft Download.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, that's yet another reference to Rx I'm getting this week. Will need time to digest. –  zzandy Sep 14 '12 at 15:26
public static IEnumerable<T> SingleEnumeration<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source)
{
    return new SingleEnumerator<T>(source);
}

private class SingleEnumerator<T> : IEnumerable<T>
{
    private CacheEntry<T> cacheEntry;
    public SingleEnumerator(IEnumerable<T> sequence)
    {
        cacheEntry = new CacheEntry<T>(sequence.GetEnumerator());
    }

    public IEnumerator<T> GetEnumerator()
    {
        if (cacheEntry.FullyPopulated)
        {
            return cacheEntry.CachedValues.GetEnumerator();
        }
        else
        {
            return iterateSequence<T>(cacheEntry).GetEnumerator();
        }
    }

    IEnumerator IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()
    {
        return this.GetEnumerator();
    }
}

private static IEnumerable<T> iterateSequence<T>(CacheEntry<T> entry)
{
    using (var iterator = entry.CachedValues.GetEnumerator())
    {
        int i = 0;
        while (entry.ensureItemAt(i) && iterator.MoveNext())
        {
            yield return iterator.Current;
            i++;
        }
    }
}

private class CacheEntry<T>
{
    public bool FullyPopulated { get; private set; }
    public ConcurrentQueue<T> CachedValues { get; private set; }

    private static object key = new object();
    private IEnumerator<T> sequence;

    public CacheEntry(IEnumerator<T> sequence)
    {
        this.sequence = sequence;
        CachedValues = new ConcurrentQueue<T>();
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Ensure that the cache has an item a the provided index.  If not, take an item from the 
    /// input sequence and move to the cache.
    /// 
    /// The method is thread safe.
    /// </summary>
    /// <returns>True if the cache already had enough items or 
    /// an item was moved to the cache, 
    /// false if there were no more items in the sequence.</returns>
    public bool ensureItemAt(int index)
    {
        //if the cache already has the items we don't need to lock to know we 
        //can get it
        if (index < CachedValues.Count)
            return true;
        //if we're done there's no race conditions hwere either
        if (FullyPopulated)
            return false;

        lock (key)
        {
            //re-check the early-exit conditions in case they changed while we were
            //waiting on the lock.

            //we already have the cached item
            if (index < CachedValues.Count)
                return true;
            //we don't have the cached item and there are no uncached items
            if (FullyPopulated)
                return false;

            //we actually need to get the next item from the sequence.
            if (sequence.MoveNext())
            {
                CachedValues.Enqueue(sequence.Current);
                return true;
            }
            else
            {
                FullyPopulated = true;
                return false;
            }
        }
    }
}

So this has been edited (substantially) to support multithreaded access. Several threads can ask for items, and on an item by item basis, they will be cached. It doesn't need to wait for the entire sequence to be iterated for it to return cached values. Below is a sample program that demonstrates this:

private static IEnumerable<int> interestingIntGenertionMethod(int maxValue)
{
    for (int i = 0; i < maxValue; i++)
    {
        Thread.Sleep(1000);
        Console.WriteLine("actually generating value: {0}", i);
        yield return i;
    }
}

public static void Main(string[] args)
{
    IEnumerable<int> sequence = interestingIntGenertionMethod(10)
        .SingleEnumeration();

    int numThreads = 3;
    for (int i = 0; i < numThreads; i++)
    {
        int taskID = i;
        Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
        {
            foreach (int value in sequence)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Task: {0} Value:{1}",
                    taskID, value);
            }
        });
    }

    Console.WriteLine("Press any key to exit...");
    Console.ReadKey(true);
}

You really need to see it run to understand the power here. As soon as a single thread forces the next actual values to be generated all of the remaining threads can immediately print that generated value, but they will all be waiting if there are no uncached values for that thread to print. (Obviously thread/threadpool scheduling may result in one task taking longer to print it's value than needed.)

share|improve this answer
1  
The method requires that the first enumeration is full and complete before the result is cached. And ideally on the subsequent enumerations you could return an IList<> to take advantage of Linq optimizations. –  Greg Sep 14 '12 at 15:25
    
@Greg As to your first point, that's intentional (just move the cache.Add to before the foreach to change that). I wouldn't want to cache half of the sequence, have another thread return a half-completed sequence, and then have the first thread finish off the cache entry later. As to the second point, yes, I could. It would involve re-factoring into two methods (you can have regular returns and yield returns in the same method) and I wanted to keep it simpler. If you refactor the else into a method then the if can return a List. –  Servy Sep 14 '12 at 15:31
    
@zzandy Completely re-written such that you no longer need to provide a key if you don't want. There is a new wrapper that will allow an enumerable that is iterated several times to use the cached value for all subsequent iterations. If you only ever want to use that then make the CachedSequence method private. –  Servy Sep 14 '12 at 15:47
    
@Greg I've included the optimization in my edit, since I needed to re-work the solution anyway and it wasn't going to be simple anymore no matter what. –  Servy Sep 14 '12 at 15:48
    
@Servy the initial question does not specify you need to deal with multi threading, so I think you idea is ok but could/should be simplified. If you want to deal with multi threading then your code is still not complete, if the enumeration is slow and you have several threads starting at the same time on the same variable, none of them would find the collection in cache and all of them would therefore enumerate the source. –  Wasp Sep 14 '12 at 16:16

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