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Say I have a list that holds words and another one that holds confidences associated with those words:

my @list = ("word1", "word2", "word3", "word4");
my @confidences = (0.1, 0.9, 0.3, 0.6);

I would like to obtain a second pair of lists with the elements of @list whose confidences were higher than 0.4 in sorted order, and their corresponding confidences. How do I do that in Perl? (i.e. use the list of indices used for sorting another list)

In the example above, the output would be:

my @sorted_and_thresholded_list = ("word2", "word4");
my @sorted_and_thresholded_confidences = (0.9, 0.6);
  • The entries in @list may not be unique (i.e. and sorting should be stable)
  • Sorting should be in descending order.
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1  
Are the entries in @list unique ? –  Jean Sep 14 '12 at 15:28

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

When dealing with parallel arrays, one must work with the indexes.

my @sorted_and_thresholded_indexes =
    sort { $confidences[$b] <=> $confidences[$a] }
     grep $confidences[$_] > 0.4,
      0..$#confidences;

my @sorted_and_thresholded_list =
   @list[ @sorted_and_thresholded_indexes ];
my @sorted_and_thresholded_confidences =
   @confidences[ @sorted_and_thresholded_indexes ];
share|improve this answer

Using List::MoreUtils' pairwise and part:

use List::MoreUtils qw(pairwise part);
my @list = ("word1", "word2", "word3", "word4");
my @confidences = (0.1, 0.9, 0.3, 0.6);

my $i = 0;
my @ret = part { $i++ % 2 } 
          grep { defined } 
          pairwise { $b > .4 ? ($a, $b) : undef } @list, @confidences;

print Dumper @ret;

Output:

$VAR1 = [
          'word2',
          'word4'
        ];
$VAR2 = [
          '0.9',
          '0.6'
        ];
share|improve this answer
    
You forgot to sort? –  ikegami Sep 14 '12 at 15:42
    
Feel free to add it. –  simbabque Sep 14 '12 at 16:54

If you are sure that you won't have duplicate words, I think it is probably easier to use a hash for this task, e.g.:

my %hash = ( "word1" => 0.1,
             "word2" => 0.9,
             "word3" => 0.3,
             "word4" => 0.6
           );

Then you can iterate over the keys in the hash and only find out the keys matching your criteria:

foreach my $key (keys %hash) {
    if ($hash{$key} > 0.4) {
        print $key;
    }
}
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What if there are duplicate entries in @list? –  duri Sep 14 '12 at 15:27
1  
Then this won't work - edited my answer based on your comment. –  j0nes Sep 14 '12 at 15:28
    
You forgot to sort? –  ikegami Sep 14 '12 at 15:43

Although ikegami has already stated my first choice of solution -- using indicies -- there is also the option of combining the arrays into a two-dimensional array(*). The benefit is that the data is all gathered into the same data structure, and therefore easily manipulated.

use strict;
use warnings;
use Data::Dumper;

my @list = ("word1", "word2", "word3", "word4");
my @conf = (0.1, 0.9, 0.3, 0.6);
my @comb;

for (0 .. $#list) {                       # create two-dimensional array
    push @comb, [ $list[$_], $conf[$_] ];
}

my @all = sort { $b->[1] <=> $a->[1] }    # sort according to conf
          grep { $_->[1] > 0.4 } @comb;   # conf limit

my @list_done = map $_->[0], @all;        # break the lists apart again
my @conf_done = map $_->[1], @all;

print Dumper \@all, \@list_done, \@conf_done;

Output:

$VAR1 = [
          [
            'word2',
            '0.9'
          ],
          [
            'word4',
            '0.6'
          ]
        ];
$VAR2 = [
          'word2',
          'word4'
        ];
$VAR3 = [
          '0.9',
          '0.6'
        ];

(*) = Using a hash is also an option, assuming that 1) original order is not important, 2) all the words are unique. However, unless speedy lookup is an issue, there is no drawback to using arrays.

share|improve this answer
my @list = ("word1", "word2", "word3", "word4");
my @confidences = (0.1, 0.9, 0.3, 0.6);

my @result = map { $list[$_] }
              sort { $confidences[$b] <=> $confidences[$a] }
                 grep { $confidences[$_] > 0.4 } (0..$#confidences);
share|improve this answer

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