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I have a data.frame in which certain variables contain a text string. I wish to count the number of occurrences of a given character in each individual string.

Example:

q.data<-data.frame(number=1:3, string=c("greatgreat", "magic", "not"))

I wish to create a new column for q.data with the number of occurence of "a" in string (ie. c(2,1,0)).

The only convoluted approach I have managed is:

string.counter<-function(strings, pattern){  
  counts<-NULL
  for(i in 1:length(strings)){
    counts[i]<-length(attr(gregexpr(pattern,strings[i])[[1]], "match.length")[attr(gregexpr(pattern,strings[i])[[1]], "match.length")>0])
  }
return(counts)
}

string.counter(strings=q.data$string, pattern="a")

 number     string number.of.a
1      1 greatgreat           2
2      2      magic           1
3      3        not           0
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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The stringr package provides the str_count function which seems to do what you're interested in

# Load your example data
q.data<-data.frame(number=1:3, string=c("greatgreat", "magic", "not"), stringsAsFactors = F)
library(stringr)

# Count the number of 'a's in each element of string
q.data$number.of.a <- str_count(q.data$string, "a")
q.data
#  number     string number.of.a
#1      1 greatgreat           2
#2      2      magic           1
#3      3        not           0
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way better than mine! –  tim riffe Sep 14 '12 at 15:26
    
Yours was much faster although it does need an as.character() around the main argument to succeed with the problem posed. –  BondedDust Sep 14 '12 at 20:09
    
@DWin - That's true but I avoided that issue by adding stringsAsFactors = FALSE when defining the data frame. –  Dason Sep 14 '12 at 20:10
    
Sorry I was unclear. I was actually responding to tim riffe and telling him that his function threw an error with the problem posed. He may have used your redefinition of the problem but he didn't say so. –  BondedDust Sep 14 '12 at 20:14
    
yeah, I also did, stringsAsFactors=TRUE on my comp, but didn't mention this –  tim riffe Sep 14 '12 at 20:31

If you don't want to leave base R, here's a fairly succinct and expressive possibility:

x <- q.data$string
sapply(regmatches(x, gregexpr("g", x)), length)
# [1] 2 1 0
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OK -- maybe that will only feel expressive once you've used the regmatches and gregexpr together a few times, but that combo is powerful enough that I thought it deserved a plug. –  Josh O'Brien Sep 14 '12 at 15:48
    
+1 for regmatches, I was not aware of the function. –  Roman Luštrik Sep 14 '12 at 16:06
    
regmatches is relatively new. It was introduced in 2.14. –  Dason Sep 15 '12 at 17:49
    
I don't think you need the regmatches bit. The function gregexpr returns a list with the indices of the matched occurrences for each element of x. –  savagent Aug 26 at 3:27
1  
Sorry, I forgot about the -1. It only works if each line has at least one match, sapply(gregexpr("g", q.data$string), length). –  savagent Aug 26 at 4:42

I'm sure someone can do better, but this works:

sapply(as.character(q.data$string), function(x, letter = "a"){
  sum(unlist(strsplit(x, split = "")) == letter)
})
greatgreat      magic        not 
     2          1          0 

or in a function:

countLetter <- function(charvec, letter){
  sapply(charvec, function(x, letter){
    sum(unlist(strsplit(x, split = "")) == letter)
  }, letter = letter)
}
countLetter(as.character(q.data$string),"a")
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I seem to get an error with the first one ... and the second one... (was trying to benchmark all of these.) –  BondedDust Sep 14 '12 at 20:04
    
Use as.character() –  BondedDust Sep 14 '12 at 20:10
    
edited to reflect this, thx –  tim riffe Sep 14 '12 at 20:31
nchar(as.character(q.data$string)) -nchar( gsub("a", "", q.data$string))
[1] 2 1 0

Notice that I coerce the factor variable to character, before passing to nchar. The regex functions appear to do that internally.

Here's benchmark results (with a scaled up size of the test to 3000 rows)

 q.data<-q.data[rep(1:NROW(q.data), 1000),]
 str(q.data)
'data.frame':   3000 obs. of  3 variables:
 $ number     : int  1 2 3 1 2 3 1 2 3 1 ...
 $ string     : Factor w/ 3 levels "greatgreat","magic",..: 1 2 3 1 2 3 1 2 3 1 ...
 $ number.of.a: int  2 1 0 2 1 0 2 1 0 2 ...

 benchmark( Dason = { q.data$number.of.a <- str_count(as.character(q.data$string), "a") },
 Tim = {resT <- sapply(as.character(q.data$string), function(x, letter = "a"){
                            sum(unlist(strsplit(x, split = "")) == letter) }) }, 

 DWin = {resW <- nchar(as.character(q.data$string)) -nchar( gsub("a", "", q.data$string))},
 Josh = {x <- sapply(regmatches(q.data$string, gregexpr("g",q.data$string )), length)}, replications=100)
#-----------------------
   test replications elapsed  relative user.self sys.self user.child sys.child
1 Dason          100   4.173  9.959427     2.985    1.204          0         0
3  DWin          100   0.419  1.000000     0.417    0.003          0         0
4  Josh          100  18.635 44.474940    17.883    0.827          0         0
2   Tim          100   3.705  8.842482     3.646    0.072          0         0
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