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I have a vector of stock/etf symbols, which varies in size depending on my interests.

Ex:

symbols_v <- c('UPRO','TLT','SPXU','TBT','DRN','URE','SOXL')

I would like to use the rule of combinations, two at a time to iterate over the vector, to generate pairs.

Ex:

p <- combn(symbols_v, 2)

Each pair from p should then get passed into a (user defined) two parameter function "f(x,y)" that will download stock data and perform correlations and other functions.

My questions are: 1) What would be the best data structure to use for p for step 2 below? 2) Given the data structure p, what's the easiest way to parse it to feed the pairs to the function f?

Summary: how do I take the results of the combn() function and pass each pair to a function f(x,y)?

I am trying to minimize looping, since that is considered "slow" in R.

I am probably missing something fundamental, but I can't seem to quite wrap my head around it.

Please feel free to insult my intelligence while providing an answer :)

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Can we insult your intelligence without providing an answer? :P –  Joshua Ulrich Sep 14 '12 at 15:25
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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

mapply seems to be what you're looking for. It allows you to provide a function and multiple inputs - it will then use the first element of each of your inputs for the function, then the second elements of the inputs and so on.

symbols_v <- c('UPRO','TLT','SPXU','TBT','DRN','URE','SOXL')
out <- combn(symbols_v, 2)

# What you would probably want
mapply(f, out[1,], out[2,])


# Example output
mapply(paste, out[1,], out[2,])
# get rid of names
mapply(paste, out[1,], out[2,], USE.NAMES = FALSE)
# add other parameters to function of interest
mapply(paste, out[1,], out[2,], USE.NAMES = FALSE, MoreArgs = list(sep = "."))

The output from those examples:

> mapply(paste, out[1,], out[2,])
       UPRO        UPRO        UPRO        UPRO        UPRO        UPRO 
 "UPRO TLT" "UPRO SPXU"  "UPRO TBT"  "UPRO DRN"  "UPRO URE" "UPRO SOXL" 
        TLT         TLT         TLT         TLT         TLT        SPXU 
 "TLT SPXU"   "TLT TBT"   "TLT DRN"   "TLT URE"  "TLT SOXL"  "SPXU TBT" 
       SPXU        SPXU        SPXU         TBT         TBT         TBT 
 "SPXU DRN"  "SPXU URE" "SPXU SOXL"   "TBT DRN"   "TBT URE"  "TBT SOXL" 
        DRN         DRN         URE 
  "DRN URE"  "DRN SOXL"  "URE SOXL" 
> # get rid of names
> mapply(paste, out[1,], out[2,], USE.NAMES = FALSE)
 [1] "UPRO TLT"  "UPRO SPXU" "UPRO TBT"  "UPRO DRN"  "UPRO URE"  "UPRO SOXL"
 [7] "TLT SPXU"  "TLT TBT"   "TLT DRN"   "TLT URE"   "TLT SOXL"  "SPXU TBT" 
[13] "SPXU DRN"  "SPXU URE"  "SPXU SOXL" "TBT DRN"   "TBT URE"   "TBT SOXL" 
[19] "DRN URE"   "DRN SOXL"  "URE SOXL" 
> # add other parameters to function of interest
> mapply(paste, out[1,], out[2,], USE.NAMES = FALSE, MoreArgs = list(sep = "."))
 [1] "UPRO.TLT"  "UPRO.SPXU" "UPRO.TBT"  "UPRO.DRN"  "UPRO.URE"  "UPRO.SOXL"
 [7] "TLT.SPXU"  "TLT.TBT"   "TLT.DRN"   "TLT.URE"   "TLT.SOXL"  "SPXU.TBT" 
[13] "SPXU.DRN"  "SPXU.URE"  "SPXU.SOXL" "TBT.DRN"   "TBT.URE"   "TBT.SOXL" 
[19] "DRN.URE"   "DRN.SOXL"  "URE.SOXL" 
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This answer seems to be more in-line with my current mindset and understanding of R. Thank you everyone for some really great and useful answers. –  Doug Smith Sep 14 '12 at 15:49
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You can just use the FUN argument of combn:

library(quantmod)  # for getSymbols
symbols_v <- c('UPRO','TLT','SPXU')  # shorter example
# simple function to download data and calculate correlation between close prices
f <- function(x) {
  x1 <- getSymbols(x[1], auto.assign=FALSE)
  x2 <- getSymbols(x[2], auto.assign=FALSE)
  y <- merge(Cl(x1),Cl(x2))
  cor(y[,1],y[,2],use="complete.obs")
}
# run 'f' on each pair 
p <- combn(symbols_v, 2, FUN=f, simplify=FALSE)

[[1]]
            TLT.Close
UPRO.Close -0.6394617

[[2]]
           SPXU.Close
UPRO.Close  0.0947242

[[3]]
           SPXU.Close
TLT.Close -0.06216682
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I didn't know that about combn. Good call. –  Dason Sep 14 '12 at 15:40
    
Joshua - I'm still trying to figure out the piece whereby you called x[1], x[2]. I had it in my head that the function "F" had to have two formal parameters. I see still have quite a bit to learn. –  Doug Smith Sep 14 '12 at 15:53
    
@DougSmith: it's easier if f has a single parameter. In this case, it's a length-2 character vector. If f must have two parameters, then you would have to use a mapply solution. –  Joshua Ulrich Sep 14 '12 at 15:59
    
@Joshua - a length 2 character vector as the parameter? That makes much more sense put that way. It also explains a lot about the docs that has puzzled me up to this point. This has been quite helpful. Thanks for taking the time to explain it. –  Doug Smith Sep 14 '12 at 16:16
    
@DavidRobinsin - my apologies. I'm new to Stackoverflow. Thanks for the FAQ link. I have "accepted" a solution. –  Doug Smith Sep 14 '12 at 17:47
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You can use apply(combn(symbols_v, 2),2,function(x){f(x[1],x[2])})

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2  
combn accepts a FUN argument; you don't need to use apply –  GSee Sep 14 '12 at 15:34
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combn also allows passing multiple arguments to the called function. The first argument will be passed

fun <- function (x1, x2) someOperation
y <- someData
combn(rnorm(1:10), 2, fun, x2=y)
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