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Here's what I'm trying to do:

$errmsg_1 = 'Please make changes to your post';
$errmsg_2 = 'Please make changes to your post image';

$error = 1;

echo $errmsg_.$error; //'Please make changes to your post';

Nothing will work, and there are many error messages like these ones that I have to echo.

Can anyone help?

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3  
Why not just throw all of the error messages in an array and echo $errormsg[$error]? –  jdhartley Sep 14 '12 at 15:26
    
Thanks for all the answers. In the end, we decided to use the array solution suggested by many here. –  Norman Sep 15 '12 at 6:09

10 Answers 10

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Store error messages in array:

$errmsg[1] = 'Please make changes to your post';
$errmsg[2] = 'Please make changes to your post image';

// and so on

$error = 1;

echo $errmsg[$error];
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What you're asking for is known as a variable variable -- see http://uk.php.net/manual/en/language.variables.variable.php for more info.

But please don't do that; it's considered very poor coding practice.

What you actually need is an array:

$errmsg = array(
    'Please make changes to your post',       //this will be $errmsg[0]
    'Please make changes to your post image'  //this will be $errmsg[1]
);

$error = 0;   //nb: arrays start at item number 0, not 1.

echo $errmsg[$error];

That's much better coding practice than messing around with variable variables.

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Try

echo {'$errmsg_' . $error};

Although you're doing this really rather incorrectly. You should be using an array instead; concatenating variable names is bad practice and leads to messy/unreadable/broken code. Using an array would work like this:

$errors = array(
    'Please make changes to your post',
    'Please make changes to your post image'
);

echo $errors[$error];

Although bear in mind that $error starts from 0 as arrays are 0-index based.

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echo $errmsg_{$error}; it not valid, this would result undefined variable $etc., correct use is echo ${'errmsg_'.$error}; –  dbf Sep 14 '12 at 15:42
    
@dbf Thank you - I was working from memory which rarely serves me well. –  Bojangles Sep 14 '12 at 15:56

Off the top of my head I think you want $errmsg_{$error}, but I'm not in a position to test/double check that right now.

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Undefined variable: errmsg_ –  Kermit Sep 14 '12 at 15:28
    
I actually agree with all of the folks saying an array is a better option in this case. –  David Grenier Sep 14 '12 at 15:30
    
Completely agree and have upvoted them. –  Kermit Sep 14 '12 at 15:33

This should work:

$errmsg_1 = 'Please make changes to your post';
$errmsg_2 = 'Please make changes to your post image';

$error = 1;

echo ${'errmsg_ ' . $error};
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${errmsg_ . $error}; will be referred to as a constant, quote them ${'errmsg_'.$error}; –  dbf Sep 14 '12 at 15:39
    
@dbf Thanks for that! –  Kermit Sep 14 '12 at 15:53

No offence meant but what you're doing is bad design.

A small but no means perfect solution would be store your errors as an Array.

$errors = array('Please make changes to your post', 'Please make changes to your post image');
$error = 0;
echo $errors[$error];
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Try using this ${$errmsg_.$error}

This is a variable variable: http://php.net/manual/en/language.variables.variable.php

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You're trying to do this:

function errorMsg($code)
{
  $msg;
  switch($code)
  {
  case 1:
    $msg = 'Please make changes to your post';
    break;

  case 2:
    $msg = 'Please make changes to your post image';
    break;
  }
  return $msg;
}

echo errorMsg(1);
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1  
Why did I get a downvote? This clearly solves the problem and introduces the OP to functions. –  user1477388 Sep 14 '12 at 16:53
1  
I don't understand the downvote either, it's a different approach and solves the problem ;) –  dbf Sep 14 '12 at 18:19
    
Thank you, dbf. –  user1477388 Sep 14 '12 at 18:21
$error_msg = 'Please make changes to your ';
$error[1] = 'post';
$error[2] = 'post image';

for($i=1; $i<=count($error); $i++)
 echo $error_msg . $error[$i];
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The performance wasted to iterate over an array in order to display the correct answer, against saving a few characters in a string is definitely not worth it. –  dbf Sep 14 '12 at 15:45
    
If he has to display all the errors, preferably all together at the end of the program, a loop is the way to go. –  Teena Thomas Sep 14 '12 at 15:59

Use arrays. keep the indexes for easy future reference, as well as easy error message changing and organized API.

$errmsg = array(
    1 => 'Please make changes to your post',
    2 => 'Please make changes to your post image'
);

$error = 1;

echo $errmsg[$error]; //'Please make changes to your post';
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