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I have the following code to build an advanced data structure which is pulled from SQL Server, then when the retrevial of that data is complete I update the UI. The code used is

private void BuildSelectedTreeViewSectionAsync(TreeNode selectedNode)
{
    // Initialise.
    SqlServer instance = null;
    SqlServer.Database database = null;

    // Build and expand the TreeNode.
    Task task = null;
    task = Task.Factory.StartNew(() => {
        string[] tmpStrArr = selectedNode.Text.Split(' ');

        string strDatabaseName = tmpStrArr[0];

        instance = SqlServer.Instance(this.conn);

        database = instance.GetDatabaseFromName(strDatabaseName);
    }).ContinueWith(cont => {
        instance.BuildTreeViewForSelectedDatabase(this.customTreeViewSql,
            selectedNode, database);

        selectedNode.Expand();

        task.Dispose();
    }, CancellationToken.None, TaskContinuationOptions.OnlyOnRanToCompletion,
        this.MainUiScheduler);
}

This works as it should on my main development machine; that is, it completes the build of the database object, then in the continuation update the UI and disposes the task (Task object).

However, I have been doing some testing on another machine and I get an InvalidOperationException, this is due to the task.Dispose() on task which still in the Running state, but the continuation cont should never fire unless the task has ran to completion.

Here's what the code looks like in the debugger when the exception is thrown:

enter image description here

I am aware that it almost always unneccessary to call Dispose on tasks. This question is more about why the continuation is firing at all here?**

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The reason for this is simple, you are calling Dispose on the continuation itself and not on the first task

Your code consists of:

Task task = null;
var task = <task 1>.ContinueWith(t => { 
    /* task 2 */ 

    task.Dispose();
});

In the above code, task is equal to the continuation (ContinueWith doesn't pass back the original Task, it passes the continuation) and that's what's getting captured in the closure you're passing to ContinueWith.

You can test this by comparing the references of the Task parameter passed into the ContinueWith method with task:

Task task = null;
var task = <task 1>.ContinueWith(t => { 
    /* task 2 */ 
    if (object.ReferenceEquals(t, task))
        throw new InvalidOperationException("Trying to dispose of myself!");

    task.Dispose();
});

In order to dispose of the first, you need to break it up into two Task variables and capture the first Task, like so:

var task1 = <task 1>;
var task2 = task1.ContinueWith(t => {
    // Dispose of task1 when done.
    using (task1)
    {
        // Do task 2.
    }
});

However, because the previous Task is passed to you as a parameter in the ContinueWith method, you don't need to capture task in the closure at all, you can simply call Dispose on the Task passed as a parameter to you:

var task = <task 1>.ContinueWith(t => {
    // t    = task 1
    // task = task 2
    // Dispose of task 1 when done.
    using (t)
    {
         // Do task 2.
    }
});
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I don't belive this correct. You cannot define a task & a continuation in the way you do in your first snippet. To reference task in the continuation you must create an instance of the Task, then assign to it. var task = TaskFactory.StartNew...(() => { ... }).ContinueWith(cont => { task.Dispose();}); will never work as task is not 'in scope'. var task = null; then task = TaskFactory.StartNew...(() => { ... }).ContinueWith(cont => { task.Dispose();}); will work, and the dispose acts on the Task object task, it does not refer to itself here - unless I have gone mental... :] –  Killercam Sep 14 '12 at 16:48
    
Ps. Thanks for your time... –  Killercam Sep 14 '12 at 16:48
1  
@Killercam And it does refer to itself (whether or not you are mental is a distinction you have to make for yourself =P). I've updated the answer to indicate how you can test it (see the new second code snippet). –  casperOne Sep 14 '12 at 16:56
1  
@Killercam The continuation never takes control of the initial task definition. It's simply how you assigned task. You called Task.StartNew which returned the first task, but you didn't store that value, you called ContinueWith on the return value of StartNew and that was to the variable. –  casperOne Sep 14 '12 at 17:00
1  
@Killercam Ahh, well, I couldn't assume your upvote and accepting the answer. =) Thank you. Note, this isn't really an issue with the Task Parallel Library per-se, but with closures and scope. –  casperOne Sep 14 '12 at 17:14

I'm pretty sure you are trying to do above is equivelent to:

task = Task.Factory.StartNew(() => ...);
task.ContinueWith(cont => { ... task.Dispose(); });

However, what gets assigned to task variable with your code will be the ContinueWith work item, not the origninal StartNew work item.

More importantly, you probably don't even need to worry about task.Dispose() in this scenario.

The only time there is any real value in doing task.Dispose() is when there is a task.Wait() involved somewhere, which allocates an OS wait handle resource under the covers.

More info: http://social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/en/parallelextensions/thread/7b3a42e5-4ebf-405a-8ee6-bcd2f0214f85

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+1 for the reference to the fact that Dispose() is redundent here. I have posted a good article on this in my question. However, I don't believe what you have written about the task reference is right. Take your code above, if you do Task t = TaskFactory.StartNew(() => { ... }).ContinueWith(c => t.Dispose()); this will NEVER work. However, Task t = null; then t = TaskFactory.StartNew(() => { ... }).ContinueWith(c => t.Dispose()); will, and it will work on the original t, not the continuation... –  Killercam Sep 14 '12 at 16:54

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