Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am working on a scrabble program that generates 7 letters, then allows the user to enter words and see if they are valid and what the point value would be. As soon as I started doing the values is when I started having problems.

I am calling the function wordvalue like this, and wanting to store the result into value. The users word is stored into userword[8].

int value = wordvalue(userword[8]);

Here is my code to figure out what letter is in the array cell, then add. I am not sure what is wrong with it but it crashes every time at this step.

int wordvalue (char userword[8]){

    int m;
    int currentvalue = 0;

    for (m=0; m < 8; m++){

        switch (userword[m]){

        case 'A':
        case 'E':
        case 'I':
        case 'L':
        case 'N':
        case 'O':
        case 'R':
        case 'S':
        case 'T':
        case 'U':
            currentvalue = currentvalue + 1;
            break;
        case 'D':
        case 'G':
            currentvalue = currentvalue + 2;
            break;
        case 'B':
        case 'C':
        case 'M':
        case 'P':
            currentvalue = currentvalue + 3;
            break;
        case 'F':
        case 'H':
        case 'V':
        case 'W':
        case 'Y':
            currentvalue = currentvalue + 4;
            break;
        case 'K':
            currentvalue = currentvalue + 5;
            break;
        case 'J':
        case 'X':
            currentvalue = currentvalue + 8;
            break;
        case 'Q':
        case 'Z':
            currentvalue = currentvalue + 10;
            break;

        }


    }

    //printf("%d", currentvalue);
    return currentvalue;
}
share|improve this question
4  
You should cooperate with Eric :-). (stackoverflow.com/q/12427641/1310220) –  jleahy Sep 14 '12 at 17:06
add comment

4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted
int value = wordvalue(userword[8]);

This call looks wrong.

Assuming userword is an array of char you are passing a char where a pointer to char is expected.

You probably wanted to do:

int value = wordvalue(userword);
share|improve this answer
    
can he use address of 8th element to get other elements adress in the function? –  huseyin tugrul buyukisik Sep 14 '12 at 17:01
    
Ah wow how could I have missed that. Thank you. It doesn't crash anymore but it doesn't seem like its returning currentvalue into value –  Ryan Sep 14 '12 at 17:02
    
@Ryan how can you know that it is not putting the value? –  huseyin tugrul buyukisik Sep 14 '12 at 17:06
    
When i try and print out "value" after it returns from the function back to main it prints out some very large number when it should be printing 5, testing the word CAT –  Ryan Sep 14 '12 at 17:07
    
@Ryan Your code is written to always read 8 characters. CAT is not 8 characters. –  ouah Sep 14 '12 at 17:09
show 8 more comments

I know you've already accepted an answer, but I wanted to show you a way to avoid having to write that lengthy switch statement.

The values[] array contains the Scrabble value for each letter in the alphabet. The letterValue() function then uses the ASCII value of the letter - 'A' to index into the values[] array to get the letter value. values[0] is for 'A' and values[25] is for 'Z'.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <ctype.h>

/* prototypes */
int wordvalue (char *userword);
int letterValue( char letter );

int values[] = { 1,3,3,2,1,4,2,4,1,8,5,1,3,1,1,3,10,1,1,1,1,4,4,8,4,10 };

int letterValue( char letter )
{
    return( values[toupper((int)letter) - 'A'] );  
} 

int wordvalue(char *userword)
{
    int m;
    int currentvalue = 0;

    for (m=0; m < strlen(userword); m++)
    {
        currentvalue += letterValue( userword[m]);
    }
    return currentvalue;
}

int main()
{
    char word[] = "Progress";

    printf("Value of %s is %d\n", word, wordvalue(word));
    return( 0 );
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

If userword is an already initialized string you must pass it to your function like this: wordvalue(userword).

What you have is int value = wordvalue(char userword[8]).

One problem I see with this is that you are declaring userword which is an array of 8 characters inside your function argument.

By doing this you are actually passing the 8th element of userword to wordvalue. Since you just initialized this array the value of userword[8] is unknown, and your program is going to exhibit undefined behavior.

You need to initialize your array, and give it value:

int wordvalue(char *userword);         //function declaration

int main(void)
{
    char userword[8] = "foobarrr";         //declare 8 char array holding an 8 character string
    int value = wordvalue(userword);       //call the function
    printf("%d", value);                   //print function output
    return 0;
}

/*function prototype here*/
share|improve this answer
add comment

You should program your int wordvalue(char *) function to accept an arbitrary length string as a parameter. Your code would then have to count points as long as it does not see a NULL character (\0). In your game logic, you would have to check that the word entered is not too long, or that a letter was not used twice.

Your code would look like this:

int wordvalue(char * word)
{
    int m;
    int currentvalue = 0;

    for (m = 0; word[m] != NULL; m++)
    {
        switch (word[m])
        {
        case 'A':
        case 'E':
        case 'I':
        case 'L':
        case 'N':
        case 'O':
        case 'R':
        case 'S':
        case 'T':
        case 'U':
            currentvalue = currentvalue + 1;
            break;
        case 'D':
        case 'G':
            currentvalue = currentvalue + 2;
            break;
        case 'B':
        case 'C':
        case 'M':
        case 'P':
            currentvalue = currentvalue + 3;
            break;
        case 'F':
        case 'H':
        case 'V':
        case 'W':
        case 'Y':
            currentvalue = currentvalue + 4;
            break;
        case 'K':
            currentvalue = currentvalue + 5;
            break;
        case 'J':
        case 'X':
            currentvalue = currentvalue + 8;
            break;
        case 'Q':
        case 'Z':
            currentvalue = currentvalue + 10;
            break;
        }
    }
    return currentvalue;
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.