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Currently I want to compare the speed of Python and C when they're used to do string stuff. I think C should give better performance than Python will; however, I got a total contrary result.

Here's the C program:

#include <unistd.h>
#include <sys/time.h>

#define L (100*1024)

char s[L+1024];
char c[2*L+1024];

double time_diff( struct timeval et, struct timeval st )
{
    return 1e-6*((et.tv_sec - st.tv_sec)*1000000 + (et.tv_usec - st.tv_usec ));
}

int foo()
{
    strcpy(c,s);
    strcat(c+L,s);
    return 0;
}

int main()
{
    struct timeval st;
    struct timeval et;
    int i;
    //printf("s:%x\nc:%x\n", s,c);

    //printf("s=%d c=%d\n", strlen(s), strlen(c));
    memset(s, '1', L);
    //printf("s=%d c=%d\n", strlen(s), strlen(c));
    foo();
    //printf("s=%d c=%d\n", strlen(s), strlen(c));
    //s[1024*100-1]=0;

    gettimeofday(&st,NULL);
    for( i = 0 ; i < 1000; i++ ) foo();
    gettimeofday(&et,NULL);

    printf("%f\n", time_diff(et,st));
    return 0;
}

and this is the Python one:

import time

s = '1'*102400
def foo():
    c = s + s
    #assert( len(c) == 204800 )

st = time.time()
for x in xrange(1000):
    foo()
et = time.time()

print (et-st)

and what I get:

root@xkqeacwf:~/lab/wfaster# python cp100k.py 
0.027932882309
root@xkqeacwf:~/lab/wfaster# gcc cp100k.c
root@xkqeacwf:~/lab/wfaster# ./a.out 
0.061820

Does that make sense? Or am I just making any stupid mistakes?

share|improve this question
3  
There are a few things that would lead me to question the results. Doing the string concatentation in a function is a bad idea. Building the stack frame for the function all would cost more than the concat itself, and who knows if it is being optimized out. You're not compiling the c code with any optimizations. So that's bogus. And the whole test is far too short for a meaningful comparison. Run something that takes a minute or two. –  desimusxvii Sep 14 '12 at 17:15
2  
under linux you have the time command that is tied to the kernel and gives you a more reliable result instead of messing around with your code, just code what the app is supposed to do and use time. –  Ken Sep 14 '12 at 17:18
2  
What happens if you use your knowledge of the lengths of the strings and use memmove() or memcpy() instead of strcpy() and strcat()? (I note that the strcat() could be replaced with strcpy() with no difference in result.) Also, you didn't include <string.h> so you're missing any optimizations that <string.h> might provide! –  Jonathan Leffler Sep 14 '12 at 17:19
3  
Unless you like living dangerously, you should not do programming, especially learning programming, logged in as root. A mistake that is more or less harmless as an ordinary user can be lethal when you're root. Avoid being root as much as possible! –  Jonathan Leffler Sep 14 '12 at 17:24
3  
I've not looked at the Python source, but it is practically a certainty that it keeps track of the length of its strings (they're null terminated, but Python always knows how long the active part of the string is). Knowing that length allows Python to use memmove() or memcpy() (the difference being that memmove() works correctly even if the source and destination overlap; memcpy() is not obliged to work correctly if they overlap). It is relatively unlikely that they've got anything faster than memmove/memcpy available. –  Jonathan Leffler Sep 14 '12 at 17:46

2 Answers 2

up vote 18 down vote accepted

Accumulated comments (mainly from me) converted into an answer:

  • What happens if you use your knowledge of the lengths of the strings and use memmove() or memcpy() instead of strcpy() and strcat()? (I note that the strcat() could be replaced with strcpy() with no difference in result — it might be interesting to check the timing.) Also, you didn't include <string.h> (or <stdio.h>) so you're missing any optimizations that <string.h> might provide!

Marcus: Yes, memmove() is faster than strcpy() and faster than Python, but why? Does memmove() do a word-width copy at a time?

  • Yes; on a 64-bit machine for nicely aligned data, it can be moving 64-bits at a time instead of 8-bits at a time; a 32-bit machine, likely 32-bits at a time. It also has only one a simpler test to make on each iteration (count), not ('count or is it null byte') 'is this a null byte'.

Marcus: But memmove() is still working well even after I make L=L-13, and sizeof(s) gives out L+1024-13. My machine has a sizeof(int)==4.

  • The code for memmove() is highly optimized assembler, possibly inline (no function call overhead, though for 100KiB of data, the function call overhead is minimal). The benefits are from the bigger moves and the simpler loop condition.

Marcus: So does Python use memmove() as well, or something magic?

  • I've not looked at the Python source, but it is practically a certainty that it keeps track of the length of its strings (they're null terminated, but Python always knows how long the active part of the string is). Knowing that length allows Python to use memmove() or memcpy() (the difference being that memmove() works correctly even if the source and destination overlap; memcpy() is not obliged to work correctly if they overlap). It is relatively unlikely that they've got anything faster than memmove/memcpy available.

I modified the C code to produce more stable timings for me on my machine (Mac OS X 10.7.4, 8 GiB 1333 MHz RAM, 2.3 GHz Intel Core i7, GCC 4.7.1), and to compare strcpy() and strcat() vs memcpy() vs memmove(). Note that I increased the loop count from 1000 to 10000 to improve the stability of the timings, and I repeat the whole test (of all three mechanisms) 10 times. Arguably, the timing loop count should be increased by another factor of 5-10 so that the timings are over a second.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <sys/time.h>

#define L (100*1024)

char s[L+1024];
char c[2*L+1024];

static double time_diff( struct timeval et, struct timeval st )
{
    return 1e-6*((et.tv_sec - st.tv_sec)*1000000 + (et.tv_usec - st.tv_usec ));
}

static int foo(void)
{
    strcpy(c,s);
    strcat(c+L,s);
    return 0;
}

static int bar(void)
{
    memcpy(c + 0, s, L);
    memcpy(c + L, s, L);
    return 0;
}

static int baz(void)
{
    memmove(c + 0, s, L);
    memmove(c + L, s, L);
    return 0;
}

static void timer(void)
{
    struct timeval st;
    struct timeval et;
    int i;

    memset(s, '1', L);
    foo();

    gettimeofday(&st,NULL);
    for( i = 0 ; i < 10000; i++ )
        foo();
    gettimeofday(&et,NULL);
    printf("foo: %f\n", time_diff(et,st));

    gettimeofday(&st,NULL);
    for( i = 0 ; i < 10000; i++ )
        bar();
    gettimeofday(&et,NULL);
    printf("bar: %f\n", time_diff(et,st));

    gettimeofday(&st,NULL);
    for( i = 0 ; i < 10000; i++ )
        baz();
    gettimeofday(&et,NULL);
    printf("baz: %f\n", time_diff(et,st));
}

int main(void)
{
    for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
        timer();
    return 0;
}

That gives no warnings when compiled with:

gcc -O3 -g -std=c99 -Wall -Wextra -Wmissing-prototypes -Wstrict-prototypes \
    -Wold-style-definition cp100k.c -o cp100k

The timing I got was:

foo: 1.781506
bar: 0.155201
baz: 0.144501
foo: 1.276882
bar: 0.187883
baz: 0.191538
foo: 1.090962
bar: 0.179188
baz: 0.183671
foo: 1.898331
bar: 0.142374
baz: 0.140329
foo: 1.516326
bar: 0.146018
baz: 0.144458
foo: 1.245074
bar: 0.180004
baz: 0.181697
foo: 1.635782
bar: 0.136308
baz: 0.139375
foo: 1.542530
bar: 0.138344
baz: 0.136546
foo: 1.646373
bar: 0.185739
baz: 0.194672
foo: 1.284208
bar: 0.145161
baz: 0.205196

What is weird is that if I forego 'no warnings' and omit the <string.h> and <stdio.h> headers, as in the original posted code, the timings I got are:

foo: 1.432378
bar: 0.123245
baz: 0.120716
foo: 1.149614
bar: 0.186661
baz: 0.204024
foo: 1.529690
bar: 0.104873
baz: 0.105964
foo: 1.356727
bar: 0.150993
baz: 0.135393
foo: 0.945457
bar: 0.173606
baz: 0.170719
foo: 1.768005
bar: 0.136830
baz: 0.124262
foo: 1.457069
bar: 0.130019
baz: 0.126566
foo: 1.084092
bar: 0.173160
baz: 0.189040
foo: 1.742892
bar: 0.120824
baz: 0.124772
foo: 1.465636
bar: 0.136625
baz: 0.139923

Eyeballing those results, it seems to be faster than the 'cleaner' code, though I've not run a Student's t-Test on the two sets of data, and the timings have very substantial variability (but I do have things like Boinc running 8 processes in the background). The effect seemed to be more pronounced in the early versions of the code, when it was just strcpy() and strcat() that was tested. I have no explanation for that, if it is a real effect!

Followup by mvds

Since the question was closed I cannot answer properly. On a Mac doing virtually nothing, I get these timings:

(with headers)

foo: 1.694667 bar: 0.300041 baz: 0.301693
foo: 1.696361 bar: 0.305267 baz: 0.298918
foo: 1.708898 bar: 0.299006 baz: 0.299327
foo: 1.696909 bar: 0.299919 baz: 0.300499
foo: 1.696582 bar: 0.300021 baz: 0.299775

(without headers, ignoring warnings)

foo: 1.185880 bar: 0.300287 baz: 0.300483
foo: 1.120522 bar: 0.299585 baz: 0.301144
foo: 1.122017 bar: 0.299476 baz: 0.299724
foo: 1.124904 bar: 0.301635 baz: 0.300230
foo: 1.120719 bar: 0.300118 baz: 0.299673

Preprocessor output (-E flag) shows that including the headers translates strcpy into builtin calls like:

((__builtin_object_size (c, 0) != (size_t) -1) ? __builtin___strcpy_chk (c, s, __builtin_object_size (c, 2 > 1)) : __inline_strcpy_chk (c, s));
((__builtin_object_size (c+(100*1024), 0) != (size_t) -1) ? __builtin___strcat_chk (c+(100*1024), s, __builtin_object_size (c+(100*1024), 2 > 1)) : __inline_strcat_chk (c+(100*1024), s));

So the libc version of strcpy outperforms the gcc builtin. (using gdb it is easily verified that a breakpoint on strcpy indeed doesn't break on the strcpy() call, if the headers are included)

On Linux (Debian 5.0.9, amd64), the differences seem to be negligible. The generated assembly (-S flag) only differs in debugging information carried by the includes.

share|improve this answer
    
Nice work! Best answer I've ever seen. –  Marcus Sep 14 '12 at 18:53
    
Interesting. But those numbers are all over the place, with a factor of 2 between supposedly identical runs (see bar: 0.10s - 0.20s). On a machine doing nothing else, results are quite stable. The differences with/without headers seem to be stable as well. I'll post an answer with some findings. –  mvds Sep 17 '12 at 2:37
1  
@mvds: Thanks for the extra information — 'tis interesting. I've run Student's t-test on the various sets of test data above and on my machine's data, there was no significant difference between the various sets of results (apart, obviously, from 'strcpy' vs 'memcpy() or memmove()'). When I turned off Boinc, I got stable and tightly grouped results: headers — strcpy() 0.7346±0.0042, memcpy() 0.0972±0.0014, memmove() 0.0967±0.0011; no headers — strcpy() 0.7415±0.0045; memcpy() 0.0977±0.0016; memmove() 0.0978±0.0014 (sample size 20). –  Jonathan Leffler Sep 17 '12 at 3:38
1  
If nothing else, this demonstrates some of the problems of doing decent benchmarking. –  Jonathan Leffler Sep 17 '12 at 3:54
1  
A little more research showed that for strcat the actual assembly that is run differs in that the builtin version uses an extra register to check that it doesn't go out of bounds, i.e. like strncat. But as the length parameter is set to SIZE_T_MAX it's a useless test. –  mvds Sep 17 '12 at 9:21

I believe the reason for this is that Python strings are not null-terminated.

in Python the string length is stored alongside the string, allowing it to skip the implicit strlen() used by strcat() when concatenating strings.

Adding in the fact that string concatenation is implemented directly in C for Python is probably the cause.

Edit: well, now that I actually look at the C code and see that it uses static buffers, I'm mystified as well, as I don't see how Python could avoid dynamic allocations which should be much slower...

share|improve this answer
1  
The Python version indeed requires dynamic allocation. Though the new string immediately becomes garbage, and CPython uses free lists liberally, so maybe it's not that bad. –  delnan Sep 14 '12 at 17:20
    
Ah, I didn't know that it used free lists, that could account for it. –  Bwmat Sep 14 '12 at 17:21
    
Don't go running with that assumptions. It's limited to a few types, and I could not find any sign of a free list in stringobject.c#PyString_Concat when I checked just now. –  delnan Sep 14 '12 at 17:26
    
This test is just incorrect, so I wouldn't bother guessing about the result. –  Ed S. Sep 14 '12 at 17:44
1  
@JonathanLeffler: The fact that it includes the time needed to set up and call a function. The fact that it only performs 1000 iterations. The fact that we have no idea if the C version was even an optimized build (and what the compiler settings were). It is incomplete and not a good test case. –  Ed S. Sep 14 '12 at 18:13

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