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How do I show manager id,manager name and subordinate detail under each manager record.

EMPNO  ENAME   JOB        MGR   HIREDATE   SAL   COMM  DEPTNO 
-----  ------  ---------  ----  ---------  ----  ----  ------
7839   KING    PRESIDENT  -     17-NOV-81  5000  -     10 
7698   BLAKE   MANAGER    7839  01-MAY-81  2850  -     30 
7782   CLARK   MANAGER    7839  09-JUN-81  2450  -     10 
7566   JONES   MANAGER    7839  02-APR-81  2975  -     20 
7654   MARTIN  SALESMAN   7698  28-SEP-81  1250  1400  30 
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What version of SQL Server? How many levels do you want to show? –  RedFilter Sep 14 '12 at 17:41
    
@Thomas . . . So in your data above, you want Martin to appear just under Blake? –  Gordon Linoff Sep 14 '12 at 17:50

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Try this:

WITH MyCTE AS 
( 
  SELECT EMPNO, EName, Null as ManagerId, NULL as ManagerName
  FROM Employee
  WHERE ManagerID IS NULL
  UNION ALL
  SELECT  EMPNO, EName, ManagerId, MyCTE.EName
  FROM Employee
  INNER JOIN MyCTE ON Employee.ManagerID = MyCTE.EmpID
  WHERE Employee.ManagerID IS NOT NULL 
)
SELECT *
FROM MyCTE
share|improve this answer
    
I think you need an order by of some sort to guarantee the ordering. –  Gordon Linoff Sep 14 '12 at 17:45
    
Also the second where clause is not necessary - NULLs would be eliminated by the join. Still, +1, this is the way to do it. –  Aaron Bertrand Sep 14 '12 at 17:48
    
True, he could throw on an ORDER BY if he wants ordering –  Abe Miessler Sep 14 '12 at 17:48
    
is it at all feasible to refer MyCTE.EmpID from MyCTE? –  Thomas Sep 17 '12 at 12:01

Just to add a way without CTE, you would need to join on each level you wanted:

select m.empno,
  m.ename,
  m.job,
  e1.empno,
  e1.ename underling,
  e1.mgr,
  e1.ujob,
  e2.empno,
  e2.ename subunderling,
  e2.mgr,
  e2.subjob
from
(
  select empno, ename, job
  from yourtable
  where mgr is null
) m
left join
(
  select empno, ename, job ujob, mgr
  from yourtable
) e1
  on m.empno = e1.mgr
left join
(
  select empno, ename, job subjob, mgr
  from yourtable
) e2
  on e1.empno = e2.mgr

see SQL Fiddle with Demo

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This is a hard problem, but it is solvable. First, you have to remember that a SQL query without an ORDER BY does not guarantee ordering. So, just because it happens to produce the right results does not mean that the query is correct for what you want.

The challenge is to add a sortkey onto the records, that puts things in the right order. This is a depth-first ordering of the records. One of the challenges is that three employees with the same manager need different keys -- since other records might appear between them.

So, the sort key that works is constructed by generating the path to the top including the employee id. For your data, the keys would be:

  • '7839'
  • '7839<--7698'
  • '7839<--7782'
  • '7839<--7566'
  • '7839<--7698<--7654'

These sort in the appropriate order. Creating the key is a challenge and requires a recursive CTE. (Thank you Abe for providing one.)

WITH MyCTE AS 
( 
  SELECT EMPNO, EName, Null as ManagerId, NULL as ManagerName,
         cast(EMPNO as varchar(8000)) as sortkey
  FROM Employee
  WHERE ManagerID IS NULL
  UNION ALL
  SELECT  EMPNO, EName, ManagerId, MyCTE.EName,
          mycte.sortkey+'<--'+cast(Employee.empno as varchar(8000))
  FROM Employee
  INNER JOIN MyCTE ON Employee.ManagerID = MyCTE.EmpID
  WHERE Employee.ManagerID IS NOT NULL 
)
SELECT EMPNO, EName, ManagerId, MyCTE.EName
FROM MyCTE
order by sortkey

The actual sort key is like the ones above, but with '<--' appended. One note, this only works when the sort keys are exactly 4 digits. If you have varying lengths, then you will want to left-pad them with zeros.

share|improve this answer
    
is it at all feasible to refer MyCTE.EmpID from MyCTE? –  Thomas Sep 17 '12 at 12:01

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