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Program:

#include<stdio.h>
main()
 {
  int fahr;
   float cel;
   for(fahr=0;fahr<300;fahr=fahr+20)
   {
   cel=(5/9)*(fahr-32);
     printf("\n %d \t %f",fahr,cel);
    }
}

Output which i get:

   0       0.000000
   20      0.000000
   40      0.000000
   60      0.000000
   80      0.000000
   100     0.000000
   120     0.000000
   140     0.000000
   160     0.000000
   180     0.000000
   200     0.000000
   220     0.000000
   240     0.000000
   260     0.000000
   280     0.000000
share|improve this question
    
While it's fairly obvious what's wrong here, a general tip is to give just a couple of test cases that show your error (rather than every 20 degrees from 0 to 280), and state explicitly what result you expected to get. – me_and Sep 15 '12 at 21:57

5/9 is zero in whole numbers, try cel=(fahr-32)*5/9 or float the whole boat.

share|improve this answer
    
fahr is an int too, so the reordering doesn't change anything, you need at least one x.0 or cast in that. – Daniel Fischer Sep 14 '12 at 18:07
    
@DanielFischer, reordering does a great deal, because after multiplying (fahr-32) by 5 division by nine is much more meaningful. And will actually yield sane values. To have all the precision float is helpful, tho. – Michael Krelin - hacker Sep 14 '12 at 18:11
1  
Right, overlooked that, you'll get 0 only for values between 31 and 33, which is not obscenely far off. – Daniel Fischer Sep 14 '12 at 18:14
    
Yes, the only problem is that float for cel makes no sense if calculation is done in integers. Loss of precision may be justified if there's no float involved. – Michael Krelin - hacker Sep 14 '12 at 18:17

Division between two ints always results in another int. If one of the two terms is a float or a double the other one gets automatically promoted to that type, thus yelding the correct result.

So typeof(5/9) = int while typeof(5.0/9) = typeof(5/9.0) = typeof(5.0/9.0) = double.

Therefore the correct version is:

cel=(5./9.)*(fahr-32); 

Note: This happens everytime there's a mathematical expression with types of different 'rank', types of lower ranks are promoted to match the highest.

share|improve this answer

Give this a try:

main()  
{   
  int fahr;  
  float cel;  
  for(fahr=0;fahr<300;fahr=fahr+20) 
  {  
    cel=(5./9.)*(fahr-32);  
    printf("\n %d \t %f",fahr,cel);   
  } 
}

5/9 is (as a type) int/int which will give an int. You can convert the math by changing them to 5.0/9.0, or you can just 5./9.

share|improve this answer

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