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I am using a class say baseClass, from which I derive another class derivedClass. I have a problem definition that says, apart from others:

i) A member - object initialiser should be used to initialise a data member, say var1, that is declared in the base class.

ii) i) is done inside a base class constructor. It says, this has to be invoked only via a derived class constructor.

iii) The base class is an abstract class, whose objects cannot be created. But, I have a third class, inside which, I use:

baseClass *baseObjects[5];

The compiler does not report an error.

I do not understand, what i) and ii) really mean. An explanation in simple words would be fine. Also, any assistance on iii) is welcome.

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2  
Maybe you need a C++ book, or a class? Because super is not a C++ keyword, that's a Java thing. – Mooing Duck Sep 14 '12 at 18:09
    
Err. What I meant was something related to super(). i.e. using a derived constructor, that passes the appropriate values to the base class constructor as well. – Kuttu V Sep 14 '12 at 18:11
up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think an illustration will be best.

i)

class A
{
  int i;
 public:
  A(int ii) : i(ii) {}
}

The part i(ii) is an example of a member - object initialiser. Since C++ guarantees all constructors of members will be called before the constructor body is entered, this is your only way of specifying which constructor to call for each member.

ii) In C++ there is no super keyword. You must specify the base class as such:

 class B : public A
 {
 public:
   B(int i) : A(i) {}
 }

That's partially due to the fact C++ allows multiple inheritence.

iii) Note that you haven't created any objects, only pointers to objects. And it's by this method polymorphism via inheritence is acheived in C++.

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Question 1: Read about constructors : http://www.cprogramming.com/tutorial/constructor_destructor_ordering.html

Question 2: Read about initialization list:
http://www.cprogramming.com/tutorial/initialization-lists-c++.html

Question 3: Read about pointers to derived class:
http://www.learncpp.com/cpp-tutorial/121-pointers-and-references-to-the-base-class-of-derived-objects/

I think this way instead of just answering your question you could understand what's going on,

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#include <iostream>

class Base
{
public:
    Base(int i)
    {}

    virtual ~Base() = 0
    {}

protected:
    int i_;
};

class Derived: public Base
{
public:
    Derived(int i, int j) : Base(i), j_(j)
    {}

private:
    int j_;
};

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    //Base b(1); object of abstract class is not allowed
    Derived d(1, 2); // this is fine
}

As you can see i_ is being initalized by the Derived class by calling the Base class constructor. The = 0 on the destructor assures that the Base class is pure virtual and therefore we cannot instantiate it (see comment in main).

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i) The following is what is known as an initializer list, you can use initializer lists to make sure that the data members have values before the constructor is entered. So in the following example, a has value 10 before you enter the constructor.

Class baseClass
{
    int a;
public:
    baseClass(int x):a(x)
    {
    }
}

ii) This is how you would explicitly call a base class constructor from a derived class constructor.

Class derivedClass : public baseClass
{
    int a;
public:
    derivedClass(int x):baseClass(x)
    {
    }
}

iii) You can't directly create instances of an abstract class. However, you can create pointers to an abstract base class and have those pointers point to any of its concrete implementations. So if you have an abstract base class Bird and concrete implementations Parrot and Sparrow then Bird* bird could point to either a Parrot or Sparrow instance since they are both birds.

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