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I have a Java class with a .getProperties() method, but when calling that method in Groovy, it returns a LinkedHashMap of properties, from the Groovy Beans magic instead of the getProperties method my Java class defined.

How do I call my getProperties() method instead of the Groovy one?

My Java code (simplified):

import java.util.*;

public class MyObject {
    private Collection<Property> properties;

    private static class Property {
        public String value;

        public Property(String value) {
            this.value = value;
        }

        public String toString() {
            return String.format("Property: %s", this.value);
        }
    }

    private static interface PropertyFilter {
        boolean passes(String value);
    }

    public static class StartsWithPropertyFilter implements PropertyFilter {
        public String prefix;

        public StartsWithPropertyFilter(String prefix) {
            this.prefix = prefix;
        }

        public boolean passes(String value) {
            if(value == null)
                return false;
            return value.startsWith(prefix);
        }
    }

    public MyObject() {
        this(new ArrayList<Property>());
    }

    public MyObject(Collection<Property> myProperties) {
        this.properties = myProperties;
    }

    public void addProperty(String value) {
        this.properties.add(new Property(value));
    }

    public Collection<Property> getProperties(PropertyFilter... filters) {
        Collection<Property> ret = new ArrayList<Property>();
        for(Property prop : properties) {
            boolean passes = true;
            for(PropertyFilter filter : filters) {
                if(!filter.passes(prop.value)) {
                    passes = false;
                    break;
                }
            }
            if(passes) {
                ret.add(prop);
            }
        }
        System.out.println("Java getProperties()");
        return ret;
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        MyObject obj = new MyObject();
        obj.addProperty("Fast");
        obj.addProperty("Strong");
        obj.addProperty("Furious");
        System.out.println(obj.getProperties());
        System.out.println(obj.getProperties(new MyObject.StartsWithPropertyFilter("F")));
    }
}

My Groovy Code:

MyObject obj = new MyObject()
obj.addProperty("Fast")
obj.addProperty("Strong")
obj.addProperty("Furious")
println obj.getProperties()
println obj.getProperties(new MyObject.StartsWithPropertyFilter("F"))

Run with this:

javac MyObject.java && groovy Run.groovy && echo && java MyObject

And I get this output:

[class:class MyObject]
Java getProperties()
[Property: Fast, Property: Furious]

Java getProperties()
[Property: Fast, Property: Strong, Property: Furious]
Java getProperties()
[Property: Fast, Property: Furious]

My Groovy version is a pretty recent one (2.0.1):

$ groovy -version
Groovy Version: 2.0.1 JVM: 1.6.0_27 Vendor: Sun Microsystems Inc. OS: Linux

But I originally saw the issue on 1.8.5 I believe it was.

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2 Answers 2

This is probably no longer relevant, but with one minor change you can do this:

obj.getProperties([] as MyObject.PropertyFilter[])

The change is that the PropertyFilter interface must not be private.

share|improve this answer

I don't see the same behaviour. Using Groovy 1.8.5, if I compile this as Java:

import java.util.*; 

public class MyClass {
    private Collection<String> myProperties;

    public MyClass() {
         this.myProperties = new ArrayList<String>();
    }

    public MyClass(Collection<String> myProperties) {
         this.myProperties = myProperties;
    }

    public Collection<String> getProperties() {
         System.err.println("java getProperties");
         return this.myProperties;
    }
}

and run this Groovy script:

MyClass myClass = new MyClass() println myClass.getProperties()

the output is:

bash-3.2$ javac MyClass.java 
bash-3.2$ groovy Test.groovy 
java getProperties
[]
bash-3.2$ 
share|improve this answer
    
My apologies, I didn't test my test case. The issue actually arises with a variadic method. See my updated example. –  Andrew Sep 25 '12 at 4:47

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