Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm developing a class for large number arithmetic, it now knows how to do addition, handle cin and cout.

It, however has very limited and basic subtraction functionality, and does not know how to handle negative. But that can be easily resolved.

My question is this, how to do multiplication.

I will detail how it handle cin and cout here.

For cin, it will save integers to value[500], for example, 50 will be saved to value[498] and value[499]. BUT NOT value[0] and value[1]

For cout, it will scan for the first non-zero value from value[0] to value[499], and then output from that non-zero value to the end. Also, if it finds no non-zero value, it will output 0.

Here's my code:

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

class largeNumber {
public:
    int value[500];
    largeNumber()
    {
        for ( int i = 0 ; i < 500 ; ++ i )
        {
            value[i] = 0;
        }
    }
    //below are arithmetic operations
    largeNumber operator+(const largeNumber &ln) const
    {
        largeNumber result;
        for ( int i = 0 ; i < 500 ; ++ i )
        {
            result.value[i] = value[i] + ln.value[i];
        }
        for ( int i = 499 ; i >= 0 ; -- i )
        {
            if ( result.value[i] >= 10 )
            {
                result.value[i - 1] += ( result.value[i] / 10 );
                result.value[i] %= 10;
            }
        }
        return result;
    }
    largeNumber operator-(const largeNumber &ln) const
    {
        largeNumber result;

        for ( int i = 0 ; i < 500 ; ++ i )
        {
            result.value[i] = value[i] - ln.value[i];
        }
        for ( int i = 499 ; i >= 0 ; -- i )
        {
            if ( result.value[i] < 0 )
            {
                --result.value[i - 1];
                result.value[i] += 10;
            }
        }
        return result;
    }
    largeNumber operator*(const largeNumber &ln) const
    {
        largeNumber result;
        for ( int x = 499 ; x >= 0 ; -- x )
        {
            for ( int y = 499 ; y >= 0 ; -- y )
            {
                int dx = 499 - x;
                int dy = 499 - y;
                int dr = dx + dy;
                int r = 499 - dr;
                if ( r >= 0 && r <= 499 )
                {
                    result.value[r] = value[x] * ln.value[y];
                }
            }
        }
        for ( int i = 499 ; i >= 0 ; -- i )
        {
            if ( result.value[i] >= 10 )
            {
                result.value[i - 1] += ( result.value[i] / 10 );
                result.value[i] %= 10;
            }
        }
        return result;
    }
    //below are cin, cout operators
    friend ostream& operator<<(ostream& out, const largeNumber& ln)
    {
        bool valueFound = false;
        for ( int i = 0 ; i < 500 ; ++ i )
        {
            if ( ln.value[i] != 0 )
            {
                valueFound = true;
            }
            if ( valueFound == true )
            {
                out << ln.value[i];
            }
        }
        if ( valueFound == false )
        {
            out << "0";
        }
        return out;
    }
    friend istream& operator>>(istream& in, largeNumber& ln) // input
    {
        string str;
        in >> str;
        int length = str.length();
        for ( int i = 500 - length ; i < 500 ; ++ i )
        {
            ln.value[i] = (str[length-(500-i)] - 48);
        }
        return in;
    }
};

int main()
{
    largeNumber a, b;
    string op;
    cin >> a >> op >> b;
    cout << a * b;
    return 0;
}

I've included my way to do multiplication, however it is flawed.

By the way, the number given by teacher promised that the result of multiplication will be a number less than 500 digit.

share|improve this question
    
There are already implementations of this, for example gmplib.org. Is there any particular reason for not using one of them? –  andand Sep 14 '12 at 18:58
1  
And most bignums are arbitrary size, not just 500*32 bits. –  DeadMG Sep 14 '12 at 19:02
1  
There is a great reason, it's a homework. So, I kinda need to do it myself and not use third-party library. –  Shane Hsu Sep 14 '12 at 19:03
    
homework is going away on StackOverflow. I removed it from this question. –  Chimera Sep 14 '12 at 19:22
    
In principle, you are already there. Just change assignment = to incrementation += in result.value[r] += value[x] * ln.value[y];. This should be all that is needed to make this code correct. –  LutzL Mar 4 at 21:34
show 1 more comment

1 Answer

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Lets start with simple multiplication(Long multiplication):

112 * 301

          1     1     2
          3     0     1
          ______________
          1     1     2
     0    0     0
 3   3    6
 _______________________
 3   3    7     1     2

So, this needs N by N matrix as rows to be added with shifting-n-times.

Where are you doing this addition and where is shifting?

For your question, it would need 500 x 500 multiplications and 500 x 500 additions. O(N*N)

Pro: each digit-multiplication can be done in a single byte so you can change the structure of digits that your compiler can vectorize the code and multiply 16 to 32 digits at once(unrolls quite good).

Con: many many computing(nearly 25-40 iteration per 500 digits-num)

Note: GPU-powered calculus could give it roughly 40x more speed. Such as OpenCL or Cuda.

share|improve this answer
    
I understand that it will need shifting n times, that means multiplying 2 500-digit number will result in a 999-digit number. That's why my code include a checker that checks if it will write to value[699], which will result in a run-time error. –  Shane Hsu Sep 14 '12 at 19:08
1  
There are other algorithms that are significantly more advanced but more efficient (including some that use fast fourier transforms and other complex calculations), but for a first stab at writing a library, it's probably best to stick to the way you did it on paper when you first learned how, as suggested here... –  twalberg Sep 14 '12 at 19:09
    
And the teacher promise that he will limit the output of all tests to less than 500. –  Shane Hsu Sep 14 '12 at 19:09
1  
@tuğrulbüyükışık Wikipedia details quite a few different algorithms, including Fourier multiplication. –  twalberg Sep 14 '12 at 19:13
1  
@Hindol Yes, that's why I only mentioned that other methods exist, but suggested the method proposed in the answer (besides, graduate students have homework too...). –  twalberg Sep 14 '12 at 19:16
show 9 more comments

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.