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The question is:

int z, x=5, y=-10 ,a=4, b=2;
z = x++ - --y * b / a;

Just wanted to know the output and how --y will work for the negative value of 'y'. What will be the precedence of solving this?

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2  
What have you tried? –  John Sep 14 '12 at 18:54
2  
TO know the output why don't you just run the example? –  Borgleader Sep 14 '12 at 18:54
    
@Borgleader : yes ofcourse i can run the example but i want to understand the concept behind it.. –  Arizvi Sep 14 '12 at 18:56
    
Prefix decrement decrements the operand by one and returns that before the rest of expression is evaluated. Why do you think signedness of y has anything to do with it? –  jrok Sep 14 '12 at 18:58
    
Look up "C operator precedence," study up on it, and predict what the output will be. –  John Sep 14 '12 at 18:58

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted
int z, x=5, y=-10 ,a=4, b=2;
z = x++ - --y * b / a;
z = 5++ - --(-10) * 2 / 4 // Suffix ++/-- goes first
z = 5 - --(-10) * 2 / 4 // Prefix ++/-- is next
z = 5 - (-11) * 2 / 4 // and then * and /
z = 5 - (-22) / 4
z = 5 - (-5)
z = 10

Unlike y, x keeps it's value because in suffix notation the operator returns the original value not the modified one. (Someone else linked the operator precedence page so I won't)

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It will be evaluated based on the Operator Precedence or "Order of Operations" - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operators_in_C_and_C%2B%2B#Operator_precedence

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These two are equivelent according to Order of operations

z = x++ - --y * b / a; 

z = (x++) - (((--y) * b) / a); 
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y will decrement before the = operation because the -- precedes y and x will increment AFTER the = operation because the ++ is after the x.

for example:

int i = 2, y = 3, z;
z = ++i + ++y;         //3 + 4

or

int i = 2, y = 3, z;
z = --i + --y;         //1 + 2

and

int i = 2, y = 3, z;
z = i++ + y++;         //2 + 3

Notice in the last example that it is still 2 + 3. That is because the ++ is after i and y so they are incremented after the = statement.

Knowing this, just apply your normal order of operations (1. Parentheses 2. Exponents 3. Multiplication/Divison 4. Addition/Subtraction) to solve the problem. Since the multiplication and division segments are right next to eachother just read from left to right for that part.

int z, x=5, y=-10 ,a=4, b=2;
z = x++ - --y * b / a;
y = --y
y = -11
z = 5 - -11 * 2 / 4
z = 5 - -22 / 4
z = 5 - -5
z = 10
x = 5++
x = 6 

That's my thought process for this: I interperet the values of x and y based off the location of the ++ and -- and then first mulitply -y * b and then divide that value by a and then add that value to x and then finally increment x. Remember when multiplication and division are right next to each-other just read left to right.

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i am cnfused with * and /.. they have the same precedence.. should i evaluate them left to right?? –  Arizvi Sep 14 '12 at 19:04
    
Oh, I believe left to right would be the way to go –  Keith Miller Sep 14 '12 at 19:07

The precedence of the operations is

z = ((x++) - (((--y) * b) / a));

IOW,

  1. The result of --y must be known before computing --y * b;
  2. The result of --y * b must be known before computing --y * b / a (* and / have the same precedence, but are left-associative, so a / b * c would be parsed as (a / b) * c);
  3. The result of x++ must be known before computing x++ - --y * b / a
  4. And finally, the result of x++ - --y * b / a must be known before assigning the result to z.

However...

Note that precedence is not the same thing as order of evaluation. Each of the individual expressions x++, --y, b, and a may be evaluated in any order. The compiler may choose to evaluate x++, then a, then b, then --y. The compiler may choose to evaluate --y * b / a before evaluating x++. The compiler may choose to defer applying the side effects to x++ and --y until after the assignment of the result to z.

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