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How would I use vectors in my current program; "use US dollar denominations 1, 2, 5, 10, 20, 50, and 100 in a vector."

int main()
{

    int i, dollar[7] = {0}, denom[7] = {1,2,5,10,20,50,100}, total = 0;
    string names[7] = {
        "1-Dollar bill",
        "2-Dollar bill",
        "5-Dollar bill",
        "10-Dollar bill",
        "20-Dollar bill",
        "50-Dollar bill",
        "100-Dollar bill"
    };

    for(i = 0; i < 7; i++)
    {
        cout << "How many " << setw(5) << names[i];
        if(i == 0)
            cout << "s";
        else  
            cout << "s";
        cout << " do you have? ";
        cin >> dollar[i];
    }

    for(i = 0; i < 7; i++)
    {
        cout <<  "You have" << setw(5) << dollar[i] << " " << names[i] << right;
        if(i == 0)
            if(dollar[i] == 1)
                cout << " ";
            else  
                cout << "s ";    
        else if(dollar[i] != 1) 
            cout << "s ";
        total += dollar[i] * denom[i];
        cout << endl;
    }

    cout << "The value of all your bills is $" << total << endl;
    return 0;
}

Basically my output looks like this = > "The value of all your bills is $"whatever sum input""

I've read my book and used youtube, but still can't quite fully understand how to use vectors on this assignment; also am I using "right justifying" correctly under setw(5)?

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1  
Just pointing it out: if(i==0) cout << "s"; else cout << "s"; –  chris Sep 14 '12 at 19:39
    
Your lack of curly braces and indentation makes your code extremely hard to read. Especially that last for loop. I fixed it up for other StackOverflow people, but you should seriously consider using curly braces and consistent indentation for your own uses too. –  Brendan Long Sep 14 '12 at 19:41
    
I'm a beginner lol excuse my noobness. Should I take off the else statement then? –  enigmuz Sep 14 '12 at 19:42
    
@enigmuz, My comment's snippet will output s regardless of the value of i as that's what executes if i ==0 or if not. –  chris Sep 14 '12 at 19:43
    
you should mark john's answer as accepted. seems like it worked for you –  Justin Sep 26 '12 at 5:50

2 Answers 2

It couldn't be much simpler, replace

string names[7]= {
    "1-Dollar bill",
    "2-Dollar bill",
    "5-Dollar bill",
    "10-Dollar bill",
    "20-Dollar bill",
    "50-Dollar bill",
    "100-Dollar bill"
};

with

vector<string> names(7); /* note round brackets not square brackets */
names[0] = "1-Dollar bill";
names[1] = "2-Dollar bill";
names[2] = "5-Dollar bill";
names[3] = "10-Dollar bill";
names[4] = "20-Dollar bill";
names[5] = "50-Dollar bill";
names[6] = "100-Dollar bill";

Same with dollar and denom and you're done.

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could have done with push_back and string concatenating with "Dollar bill" but needs integer to string conversion –  huseyin tugrul buyukisik Sep 14 '12 at 19:45
    
Thank you Brendan, Chris, and John! I went ahead and edited my code to vector<string> denom(7); denom[0] = 1; denom[1] = 2; denom[2] = 5; denom[3] = 10; denom[4] = 20; denom[5] = 50; denom[6] = 100; vector<string> names(7); names[0] = "1-Dollar bill"; names[1] = "2-Dollar bill"; names[2] = "5-Dollar bill"; names[3] = "10-Dollar bill"; names[4] = "20-Dollar bill"; names[5] = "50-Dollar bill"; names[6] = "100-Dollar bill"; However, for the dollar[7] = {0}; that I have, do I name the vectors 1,2,3,4,5,6,7? Sort of got lost in that step. –  enigmuz Sep 14 '12 at 19:52
    
Well it should be vector<int> denom(7);. For the dollar vector, you ask the user to enter the values, so you don't need to assign them yourself, just vector<int> dollar(7); seems enough to me. The names of your vectors are denom, dollar and names, just like the names of your arrays. 0, 1, 2, etc are indices to your vector, not names. I guess what I'm trying to say is that, for this program, vectors are no different to arrays, and if you understand how the arrays work in this program you should also understand how the vectors work. It's only a slightly different syntax. –  john Sep 14 '12 at 19:54
    
I edited the code as followed, but when I try to compile g++ I get this error message "hw2pr41.cpp: In function int main()': hw2pr41.cpp:46: error: total' was not declared in this scope hw2pr41.cpp:50: error: `total' was not declared in this scope " –  enigmuz Sep 14 '12 at 19:59
    
Do you have int total = 0; somewhere near the top of your code? I get the feeling that maybe you didn't write the program above, and you've just been asked to modify it? –  john Sep 14 '12 at 20:00
int main()
{
    std::vector<int>dollar;             //This makes an empty vector of ints
    std::vector<int>denom;              //so does this. 
    int total = 0;

    std::vector<std::string> names;     //this makes an empty vector of strings.
    names.push_back("1-Dollar bill");    //push_back means add to the end of the vector
    names.push_back("2-Dollar bill");
    names.push_back("5-Dollar bill");
    names.push_back("10-Dollar bill");
    names.push_back("20-Dollar bill");
    names.push_back("50-Dollar bill");
    names.push_back("100-Dollar bill");

    cout << names[0]; //This prints "1-Dollar bill"
}

Hopefully this will get you started.

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