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Forgive the ignorance of this question, as I'm completely new to C#, but how would one go about setting and handling a temporary or timed variable? For example, whenever an event fires, I want to increment a counter. If the counter exceeds 3 within 60 seconds, I want to trigger another event. Elsewise, if 60 seconds passes and the counter isn't incremented, it resets back to 0.

Should I be using MemoryCache? Or is there some nifty flag I can set for variables to make them unset after a specified duration (assuming they aren't refreshed)? What would be the best way to go about accomplishing this simple task? Note that I'm not necessarily looking for someone to write it for me; just a helpful hand or suggestion to point me in the right direction. This is a rough outline of what I'm trying to accomplish:

private static int totalCount = 0;
private static double maxCount = 3;
private static double timeLimit = 60;

private static void TestEvent(object src, EventArgs mea)
{
  totalCount++;
  if (totalCount > maxCount)
  {
    DoSomething();
  }
}

Thanks for any assistance you can offer. I make it a point to always reward helpful answers.

share|improve this question
    
what is the end result you want just to help clarify and open the floor to "clean" answers, for example if your goal was to lock an account after too many failed attempts, it helps Reads know what you are looking for. –  John Sykor Sep 14 '12 at 19:49
    
what is your problem ? checking every 60 sec the states or raising an event ? –  Cybermaxs Sep 14 '12 at 19:52
1  
What it the event fires at intervals such that it only fires twice in the first 60 seconds (event 1 and 2), but then immediately fires three times after that (events 3, 4 and 5) so that events 2 through 5 happen within 60 seconds? You would miss that if you cleared the count after the first 60 seconds. Don't you really need some kind of sliding window to catch the situation you're looking for? –  hatchet Sep 14 '12 at 19:57
    
John Skyor: The end result is to fire an event to stop a process from running if something else happens 3 times in 60 seconds. –  daveycroqet Sep 14 '12 at 20:02
    
Cybermaxs: I'm sorry, I don't understand your question. –  daveycroqet Sep 14 '12 at 20:03

6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You could maintain a Queue<T> (see http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/7977ey2c.aspx), where each entry is the time that an event fired. When an event fires, you first remove from the queue any entries that are more than 60 seconds old (which is easy, because the queue is ordered by time, and the head of the queue is the oldest entry), then add a new entry for the event that just fired. If the count of the queue exceeds your threshold, then you have satisfied the condition you're looking for.

I recommend using DateTime.UtcNow instead of DateTime.Now for the time you store in the Queue<T>. UtcNow is much faster, and it avoids the problem that transitions from daylight savings time to standard time and vice versa can cause.

Here is some code off the top of my head (may need a little fixing up):

private static Queue<DateTime> eventQueue = new Queue<DateTime>();
private static int timeWindowSeconds = 60;
private static int threshold = 3;

private static void TestEvent(object src, EventArgs mea) {
    DateTime now = DateTime.UtcNow;
    DateTime tooOld = now.AddSeconds(-timeWindowSeconds);

    // remove old entries
    while((eventQueue.Count > 0) && (eventQueue.Peek() < tooOld)) {
        eventQueue.Dequeue();
    }

    // add new entry
    eventQueue.Enqueue(now);

    // test for condition
    if (eventQueue.Count >= threshold) {
        eventQueue.Clear();
        DoSomething();           
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I'm going to try a few other of these answers first because they may adequately fit my needs, but I think yours will probably end up being the solution. I just have to get around to figuring out how to build a queue system. –  daveycroqet Sep 14 '12 at 20:16
    
@daveycroqet - .Net has a Queue class you can use. I've updated my answer to include a link to docs for it. –  hatchet Sep 14 '12 at 20:18

You might do it like this:

private static int totalCount = 0;
private static double maxCount = 3;
private static TimeSpan timeLimit = TimeSpan.FromSeconds(60);
private static DateTime lastIncrementTime;

private static void TestEvent(object src, EventArgs mea)
{
    // If the time between now and lastIncrementTime is more than the timeLimit...
    if(DateTime.Now - lastIncrementTime > timeLimit)
    {
        totalCount = 0;
    }
    lastIncrementTime = DateTime.Now;

    totalCount++;     
    if (totalCount > maxCount)
    {
        DoSomething();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Handles the functionality, but perhaps add a timer object to call that function incrementally instead of just looping it? –  Joshua Sep 14 '12 at 20:00
    
I'm going to test out your code and experiment with it, though I don't quite grasp the first If statement. Anyhow, thank you, and I appreciate your assistance. –  daveycroqet Sep 14 '12 at 20:18

You can use the StopWatch class.

On the form load event (if you want to count the 60 second from that event), start the timer, Everytime in the click event,check how many seconds it is invoked your other method or so.

share|improve this answer
    
Noted. I'm looking into StopWatch now. Thanks! –  daveycroqet Sep 14 '12 at 20:20

I'd do something like this:

private class SomeEventMonitor
{
    public  int      Threshold       { get ; private set ; }
    public  TimeSpan ThresholdWindow { get ; private set ; }

    private DateTime  marker ;
    private int       count  ;

    /// <summary>
    /// public constructor
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="threshold"></param>
    /// <param name="window"></param>
    public SomeEventMonitor( int threshold , TimeSpan window )
    {
        if ( threshold <  1             ) throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("threshold") ;
        if ( window    <= TimeSpan.Zero ) throw new ArgumentOutofRangeException("window") ;

        this.Threshold       = threshold ;
        this.ThresholdWindow = window    ;

        Reset() ;

        return ;
    }

    private void Reset()
    {
        this.marker       = DateTime.Now ;
        this.count        = 0            ;
        return ;
    }

    public event EventHandler ThresholdExceeded ;

    private static readonly object latch = new object() ;
    public void EventWatcher( object source , EventArgs eventArgs )
    {
        lock ( latch )
        {
            DateTime current = DateTime.Now ;

            if ( ++count > Threshold )
            {
                TimeSpan window = current -marker ;
                if ( window > ThresholdWindow )
                {
                    ThresholdExceeded( this , new EventArgs() ) ;
                    Reset() ;
                }
            }

        }
        return ;
    }

}
share|improve this answer

You can use another variable to log the time of changing the value of totalcount. check it with the current time and do whatever you want.
Here is the code...

private static int totalCount = 0;
private static double maxCount = 3;
private static double timeLimit = 60;
private static DateTime  timeflag= DateTime.Now;

private static void TestEvent(object src, EventArgs mea)
{
    if (timeflag.AddSeconds(timeLimit) < DateTime.Now)
    {
        totalCount = 0;
    }
    totalCount++;
    timeflag = DateTime.Now;
    if (totalCount > maxCount)
    {
            DoSomething();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Your code has a bug. You want <, rather than > in your timeFlag check, otherwise you'll reset totalCount any time that the TestEvent is called within the last timeLimit seconds, rather than resetting it if it hasn't been called in the last timeLimit seconds. –  Jon Senchyna Sep 14 '12 at 20:15
    
Thanks. I'm going to play around with this and see if I can get it working the way I want. I appreciate all your help. –  daveycroqet Sep 14 '12 at 20:17
    
@JonSenchyna : oops!! I made a mistake. My bad. Thanks. –  Krishanu Dey Sep 14 '12 at 20:32

There are myriad ways you could approach this. The first thing that comes to mind for me would be to use a Stopwatch object or a Timer object that starts on a background thread, and then write an event handler that can subscribe to the event in which you're interested. As the event occurs, your handler fires, allowing you to suspend the timer and query the time elapsed, and make your increment/reset decision accordingly.

That's merely a very rough sketch of one notion, but should give you some ideas moving forward. Good luck.

Per the comment made by @hatchet above, this almost starts to sound like a queue with "expiring" members or a "sliding window" event horizon you'd have to capture should that comment accurately reflect your problem.

EDIT Being the borderline obsessive-compulsive that I am, I gave your original problem some thought and came up with a concept that may or may not be relevant to your problem, but at least for the academic exercise I'm going to post what I did. What caught my attention in your original post was the notion of an expiring or timed variable which I thought was quite novel. Your problem specified that you want to do something specific when a given interval elapses.

I tried to abstract that idea into a generic form, thinking of a few ways such an idea might be useful. One idea that came to mind was in a game environment, where (for example) a message might only be available to the player for 20 seconds before "self-destructing." I could imagine how having the expiration "plumbing" wired into a type might prove very convenient. Another scenario could be in a CAI environment where a System.Drawing.Image should only be displayed for a fixed time, then disappear - again, a scenario where having the expiration and timing code built-in could be useful.

So, with at least that much notional practicality in mind, I set to work, and what I threw together (and I won't pretend that its comprehensive or complete) is a generic for an Expiring type, expressed as Expiring<T>. The baseline code I've put together is as follows:

    // First stab at an "expiring" type that is only valid for a set interval.
public class Expiring<T>
{
    public delegate void ExpiredHandler(object sender, EventArgs e);
    public event ExpiredHandler OnExpired;

    T instance;
    int signaledCount = 0;
    long milliseconds = 0;
    bool isExpired = false;
    bool exceptOnExpiredReference = true;
    System.Timers.Timer lapseTimer = new System.Timers.Timer();

    public Expiring(T value)
    {
        instance = value;
    }

    public virtual void TimerElapsed(object sender, System.Timers.ElapsedEventArgs args)
    {
        if (OnExpired != null)
        {
            OnExpired(this, null);
        }

        isExpired = true;
    }

    public Expiring(T startValue, long expirationInterval, bool throwElapsedReferenceException):this(startValue)
    {
        milliseconds = expirationInterval;
        lapseTimer.AutoReset = true;
        lapseTimer.Interval = milliseconds;
        exceptOnExpiredReference = throwElapsedReferenceException;
        lapseTimer.Elapsed+=new System.Timers.ElapsedEventHandler(TimerElapsed);
        this.Set();

    }


    public void Set()
    {
        signaledCount++;
        lapseTimer.Stop();
        lapseTimer.Start();
    }

    public T Value
    {
        get
        {
            if (!isExpired || !exceptOnExpiredReference)
                return instance;
            else
                throw new InvalidOperationException("Reference to an expired value.");
        }
        set
        {
            instance = value;
        }
    }
}

The idea here is that someone could declare an Expiring<int>, specify its initial value, expiration time, and a value to indicate whether an attempt to access the value of an instance after the expiration interval has passed should throw an exception. When the expirationInterval passes, the OnExpired event is raised, allowing the declarer to specify a custom event handler to provide custom actions when the value expires.

If the caller wishes to reset the expiration timer, he need only call the Set() method of the object. That also increments an internal "signaledCount" value that I ultimately did not use, but was thinking of in terms of determining how many times the expiration timer has been reset. If the Value property of the object is accessed after the expiration interval passes, an InvalidOperationException is thrown with a "Value has expired" message.

This idea, unfortunately, has more notional/academic value than practical, I'm afraid. It would have a great deal more utility if it were possible to overload all the arithmetic operators to the implementations of the native value types, but I discovered quickly that C# doesn't like this notion at all (and found that out right here on a rather extensive post on the subject here on SO). Ideally, I'd love to be able to say something like:

Expired<Int32> foo = new Expired<Int32>(5,10000,true);
Expired<Int32> bar = new Expired<Int32>(10,10000,true);
Expired<Int32> baz = foo+bar;  // can't make that work

There was some notion that this problem could be overcome with dynamic types, but I opted not to pursue it at this point. The idea, as I hammered it out, is offered for discussion as it applies to a generic view of the OP's "timed variable" notion. Constructive comments/criticism/refinements encouraged and welcome.

share|improve this answer
    
Two of you have suggested StopWatch now and I plan to look into it ASAP. I may end up going the queue route, but I won't know for certain until I can figure out just how to do that. Thank you for your helpful comments! –  daveycroqet Sep 14 '12 at 20:19

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