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I have little experience with CSS so this might be a very simple problem.

I have a table of contents on my web page with links like this:

<a href="#user-interface">User interface</a>

and somewhere else I have a bookmark like like this:

<a name="user-interface">User Interface</a>

Besides that I have a CSS file with the following style:

a:hover
{
    color:#D090D0;
    background:#803080;
    text-decoration:none;
}

The goal is to change the color and background color of the link when I move the cursor over the link, and that is working perfectly. But the problem is that the bookmarks are also changing style when I move the mouse pinter over them. It makes sense to me since both the link and the bookmark use the <a> tag but i cannot figure out how to distinguish both on the CSS. I know I could use a class for the link but I wonder if there is a better way.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

<a name="..."> is deprecated.

Instead, you should just put an id="..." on any element.

To answer the question, add :link.

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Use a class:

In HTML, use the class attribute.

<a href="#user-interface" class="foo">User interface</a>
<a name="user-interface">User Interface</a>

In the css:

.foo:hover
{
    color:#D090D0;
    background:#803080;
    text-decoration:none;
}

Now, the style is only applied to the elements having class foo.

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Use :link selector to select a link

a:link:hover
{
    color:#D090D0;
    background:#803080;
    text-decoration:none;
}

http://jsfiddle.net/9r4L9/

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Will not work for visited links. –  Pavlo Sep 14 '12 at 22:09

Add a class to the bookmark and then add some style on it after the hover declaration:

<a class="bookmark" name="user-interface">User Interface</a>

and css:

a:hover
{
    color:#D090D0;
    background:#803080;
    text-decoration:none;
}
a.bookmark {
    color: black;
    background: white;
    text-decoration:none;
}
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While the :link selector appears to work, according to W3Schools, it only applies to unvisited links.

(Edit: It appears W3Schools was misleading on this. The :link selector, in some browsers at least, will select <a> tags that link to something, visited or not, but the color attribute will be overridden by the browser defaults for visited links. Apparently the attribute selector, as detailed below, has a higher specificity than the default browser settings, so if you want to force your links to be the color you set, regardless of whether the user has clicked that link before or not, then the attribute selector should be used.)

One way to do this if you're not overly concerned with IE6, and have a doctype specified for IE 7 and 8, would be to use an attribute selector:

a[href]:hover {
    color:#D090D0;
    background:#803080;
    text-decoration:none;
}

Outside of that, I think you'd be best off adding a class.

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1  
"In order to style only non-visited links, you need to put the :link rule before the other ones"MDN page. You are providing inaccurate information using unreliable source. I must downvote you. –  Pavlo Sep 14 '12 at 22:07
    
Hmm, I had thought that most of the w3fools things were nitpicky at worst, but this one is legitimately inaccurate. Thanks for clarifying. –  Jeremy T Sep 17 '12 at 15:30
    
Maybe update your answer then? Upvoting on comments works as well. :) –  Pavlo Sep 17 '12 at 15:39
    
I just made a JSFiddle to test, jsfiddle.net/G2tYc and it appears that W3Schools might actually be accurate (in my version of Chrome at least). I suspect that the reason that it's not working has something to do with the default styles? –  Jeremy T Sep 17 '12 at 16:12
1  
Interesting. It appears that :link has a lower priority in CSS than whatever the default styles are in Chrome, which presumably has a specification for text color, but not background. Regardless, I'm pretty sure that :link is an unreliable solution to this problem, and an attribute selector (perhaps with some javascript fallback code to add a class for IE) is the better solution. –  Jeremy T Sep 17 '12 at 17:55

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