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How do you pass arguments from within a rake task and execute a command-line application from Ruby/Rails?

Specifically I'm trying to use pdftk (I can't find a comparable gem) to split some PDFs into individual pages. Args I'd like to pass are within < > below:

$ pdftk <filename.pdf> burst output <filename_%04d.pdf>
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

In the ruby code for your rake task:

`pdftk #{input_filename} burst output #{output_filename}`

You could also do:

system("pdftk #{input_filename} burst output #{output_filename}")

system() just returns true or false. backticks or %x() returns whatever output the system call generates. Usually backticks are preferred, but if you don't care, then you could use system(). I always use backticks because it's more concise.

More info here: http://rubyquicktips.com/post/5862861056/execute-shell-commands

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that simple huh? thought maybe i'd have to call some library to execute a command... guess not! thanks! –  Meltemi Sep 14 '12 at 21:38
    
That simple. You can get some more info here: rubyquicktips.com/post/5862861056/execute-shell-commands –  raphaelcm Sep 14 '12 at 21:38
    
As an aside, I use ruby for many shell scripts because of this. I f***ing hate bash. –  raphaelcm Sep 14 '12 at 21:39
    
no require 'pdftk' or the like? –  Meltemi Sep 14 '12 at 21:44
    
no, it's a system call, ruby require wouldn't help. If it's not working, make sure the environment variables are set such that pdftk can be called from wherever you're invoking the rake task –  raphaelcm Sep 14 '12 at 21:46
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e.g. as:

filename = 'filename.pdf'
filename_out = 'filename_%04d.pdf'

`pdftk #{filename} burst output #{filename_out}`

or

system("pdftk #{filename} burst output #{filename_out}")

system returns a retrun code, the backtick-version return STDOUT.

If you need stdout and stderr, you may also use Open3.open3:

filename = 'filename.pdf'
filename_out = 'filename_%04d.pdf'
cmd = "pdftk #{filename} burst output #{filename_out}"

require 'open3'
Open3.popen3(cmd){ |stdin, stdout, stderr|
  puts "This is STDOUT of #{cmd}:"
  puts stdout.read
  puts "This is STDERR of #{cmd}:"
  puts stderr.read
}
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what's that system function doing? that's kind of what I was expecting to have to do... pros/cons to one style over the other? –  Meltemi Sep 14 '12 at 21:42
1  
system() returns true or false. backticks or %x() returns whatever output the system call generates. Usually backticks are preferred, but if you don't care, then you could use system(). I always use backticks because it's more concise. –  raphaelcm Sep 14 '12 at 21:47
    
I adapted my answer and added a solution with Open3.popen3 to get stderr and stdout. –  knut Sep 14 '12 at 22:15
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