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I'm very confused as to how exactly I can ensure thread-safety when calling Python code from a C (or C++) thread.

The Python documentation seems to be saying that the usual idiom to do so is:

PyGILState_STATE gstate;
gstate = PyGILState_Ensure();

/* Perform Python actions here. */
result = CallSomeFunction();
/* evaluate result or handle exception */

/* Release the thread. No Python API allowed beyond this point. */
PyGILState_Release(gstate);

And indeed, this stackoverflow answer seems to confirm as much. But a commenter (with a very high reputation) says otherwise. The commenter says you should use PyEval_RestoreThread()/PyEval_SaveThread().

The docs seem to confirm this:

PyThreadState* PyEval_SaveThread()

Release the global interpreter lock (if it has been created and 
thread support is enabled) and reset the thread state to NULL, 
returning the previous thread state (which is not NULL). If the lock 
has been created, the current thread must have acquired it. (This 
function is available even when thread support is disabled at compile 
time.)

void PyEval_RestoreThread(PyThreadState *tstate)

Acquire the global interpreter lock (if it has been created and thread 
support is enabled) and set the thread state to tstate, which must not 
be NULL. If the lock has been created, the current thread must not have 
acquired it, otherwise deadlock ensues. (This function is available even 
when thread support is disabled at compile time.)

The way the docs describe this, it seems that PyEval_RestoreThread()/PyEval_SaveThread() is basically a mutex lock/unlock idiom. So it would make sense that before calling any Python code from C, you first need to lock the GIL, and then unlock it.

So which is it? When calling Python code from C, should I use:

PyGILState_Ensure()/PyGILState_Release()

or

PyEval_RestoreThread/PyEval_SaveThread?


And what is really the difference?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

First, you almost never want to call PyEval_RestoreThread/PyEval_SaveThread. Instead, you want to call the wrapper macros Py_BEGIN_ALLOW_THREADS/Py_END_ALLOW_THREADS. The documentation is written for those macros, which is why you couldn't find it.

Anyway, either way, you don't use the thread functions/macros to acquire the GIL; you use them to temporarily release the GIL when you've acquired it.

So, why would you ever want to do this? Well, in simple cases you don't; you just need Ensure/Release. But sometimes you need to hold onto your Python thread state until later, but don't need to hold onto the GIL (or even explicitly need to not hold onto the GIL, to allow some other thread to progress so it can signal you). As the docs explain, the most common reasons for this are doing file I/O or extensive CPU-bound computation.

Finally, is there any case where you want to call the functions instead of the macros? Yes, if you want access to the stashed PyThreadState. If you can't think of a reason why you might want that, you probably don't have one.

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