Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

If I have the data.tables DT and neighbors:

set.seed(1)
library(data.table)
DT <- data.table(idx=rep(1:10, each=5), x=rnorm(50), y=letters[1:5], ok=rbinom(50, 1, 0.90))
n <- data.table(y=letters[1:5], y1=letters[c(2:5,1)])

n is a lookup table. Whenever ok == 0, I want to look up the corresponding y1 in n and use that value for x and the given idx. By way of example, row 4 of DT:

> DT
   idx          x y ok
1:   1 -0.6264538 a  1
2:   1  0.1836433 b  1
3:   1 -0.8356286 c  1
4:   1  1.5952808 d  0
5:   1  0.3295078 e  1
6:   2 -0.8204684 a  1

The y1 from n for d is e:

> n[y == 'd']
   y y1
1: d  e

and idx for row 4 is 1. So I would use:

> DT[idx == 1 & y == 'e', x]
[1] 0.3295078

I want my output to be a data.table just like DT[ok == 0] with all the x values replaced by their appropriate n['y1'] x value:

> output
   idx          x y ok
1:   1  0.3295078 d  0
2:   2 -0.3053884 d  0
3:   3  0.3898432 a  0
4:   5  0.7821363 a  0
5:   7  1.3586800 e  0
6:   8  0.7631757 d  0

I can think of a few ways of doing this with base R or with plyr... and maybe its late on Friday... but whatever the sequences of merges that this would require in data.table is beyond me!

share|improve this question
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Great question. Using the functions in the other answers and wrapping Blue's answer into a function blue, how about the following. The benchmarks include the time to setkey in all cases.

red = function() {
    ans = DT[ok==0]
      # Faster than setkey(DT,ok)[J(0)] if the vector scan is just once
      # If lots of lookups to "ok" need to be done, then setkey may be worth it
      # If DT[,ok:=as.integer(ok)] can be done first, then ok==0L slightly faster

    # After extracting ans in the original order of DT, we can now set the key :
    setkey(DT,idx,y)
    setkey(n,y)

    # Now working with the reduced ans ...

    ans[,y1:=n[y,y1,mult="first"]]
    # Add a new column y1 by reference containing the lookup in n
    # mult="first" because we know n's key is unique, for speed (to save looking
    # for groups of matches in n). Future version of data.table won't need this.
    # Also, mult="first" has the advantage of dropping group columns (so we don't
    # need [[2L]]). mult="first"|"last" turns off by-without-by of mult="all".

    ans[,x:=DT[ans[,list(idx,y1)],x,mult="first"]]
    # Changes the contents of ans$x by reference. The ans[,list(idx,y1)] part is
    # how to pick the columns of ans to join to DT's key when they are not the key
    # columns of ans and not the first 1:n columns of ans. There is no need to key
    # ans, especially since that would change ans's order and not strictly answer
    # the question. If idx and y1 were columns 1 and 2 of (unkeyed) ans then we
    # wouldn't need that part, just
    #    ans[,x:=DT[ans,x,mult="first"]]
    # would do (relying on DT having 2 columns in its key). That has the advantage
    # of not copying the idx and y1 columns into a new data.table to pass as the i
    # DT. To save that copy y1 could be moved to column 2 using setcolorder first.

    redans <<- ans
    }


crdt(1e5)
origDT = copy(DT)
benchmark(blue={DT=copy(origDT); system.time(blue())},
          red={DT=copy(origDT); system.time(red())},
          fun={DT=copy(origDT); system.time(fun(DT,n))},
          replications=3, order="relative")

test replications elapsed relative user.self sys.self user.child sys.child
 red            3   1.107    1.000     1.100    0.004          0         0
blue            3   5.797    5.237     5.660    0.120          0         0
 fun            3   8.255    7.457     8.041    0.184          0         0

crdt(1e6)
[ .. snip .. ]
test replications elapsed relative user.self sys.self user.child sys.child
 red            3  14.647    1.000    14.613    0.000          0         0
blue            3  87.589    5.980    87.197    0.124          0         0
 fun            3 197.243   13.466   195.240    0.644          0         0

identical(blueans[,list(idx,x,y,ok,y1)],redans[order(idx,y1)])
# [1] TRUE

The order is needed in the identical because red returns the result in the same order as DT[ok==0] whereas blue appears to be ordered by y1 in the case of ties in idx.

If y1 is unwanted in the result it can be removed instantly (regardless of table size) using ans[,y1:=NULL]; i.e., this can be included above to produce the exact result requested in question, without affecting the timings at all.

share|improve this answer
    
I am consistently surprised with the power of data.table. Doing this kind of operation using a different package (or base R) would require both more lines of code and more time! Well done and thank you for the help as always. –  Justin Sep 17 '12 at 14:15
    
For posterity, if you wouldn't mind adding comments to some of the lines in your function to explain how they're working and why you chose that technique, it would be great! –  Justin Sep 17 '12 at 14:21
    
Cool, I'm learning some new things. Don't key/sort if you just need to search once. Subset the result set of data you're looking for first before doing joins. In the line ans[,y1:=n[y,y1,mult="first"]], the y is scoped in terms of ans (as the FAQ confirms in 2.13). If you know your data is mapped one-to-one, use mult="first". Question: In ans[,x:=DT[ans[,list(idx,y1)],x,mult="first"]], is list(idx,y1) interpreted in the scope of ans because of the first outer ans bracket, or because of the second inner ans bracket? –  Blue Magister Sep 17 '12 at 17:40
2  
@BlueMagister Great, that's all spot on. To answer the last part it's because ans[,list(idx,y1)] runs first, and that result is passed as i of the DT[...] outer part. –  Matt Dowle Sep 18 '12 at 15:29
    
@Justin No problem, comments now added. –  Matt Dowle Sep 18 '12 at 16:06
add comment
library(data.table)

crdt <- function(i=10){
 set.seed(1)
 DT <<- data.table(idx=rep(1:i, each=5), x=rnorm(5*i), 
                   y=letters[1:5], ok=rbinom(5*i, 1, 0.90))
 n <<- data.table(y=letters[1:5], y1=letters[c(2:5,1)])
} 

fun <- function(DT,n){
 setkey(DT,ok)
 n1 <- merge(n,DT[J(0),list(y,idx)],by="y")
 DT[J(0),x:=DT[paste0(y,idx) %in% paste0(n1[,y1],n1[,idx]),x]]
} 

crdt(10)
fun(DT,n)[J(0)]
     ok idx          x y
[1,]  0   1  0.3295078 d
[2,]  0   2 -0.3053884 d
[3,]  0   3  0.3898432 a
[4,]  0   5  0.7821363 a
[5,]  0   7  1.3586796 e
[6,]  0   8  0.7631757 d

But it is still pretty slow for bigger data.tables:

crdt(1e6)
system.time(fun(DT,n)[J(0)])
       User      System     elapsed 
      4.213       0.162       4.374 

crdt(1e7)
system.time(fun(DT,n)[J(0)])
       User      System     elapsed 
    195.685       3.949     199.592 

I'm interested to learn a faster solution.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 anyway. It's likely the two paste0 slowing down i; that's (almost) always done better with a 2 column key. –  Matt Dowle Sep 16 '12 at 22:03
add comment

Super convoluted answer:

setkey(
    setkey(
        setkey(DT,y)[setkey(n,y),nomatch=0] #inner joins DT to n
    #matches the new x value by idx and y, and assigns it
    ,idx,y1)[setkey(J(idx,y,new.x=x),idx,y),x:=new.x] 
,ok)[list(0)] #pulls things where ok == 0

It looks like Roland's answer is better for smaller tables, but mine eventually catches up at larger sizes. I haven't done a lot of checking, though.

> library(rbenchmark)
> benchmark(fun(DT,n)[J(0)],setkey(setkey(setkey(DT,y)[setkey(n,y),nomatch=0],idx,y1)[setkey(J(idx,y,new.x=x),idx,y),x:=new.x],ok)[list(0)])
                                                                                                                                  test
1                                                                                                                     fun(DT, n)[J(0)]
2 setkey(setkey(setkey(DT, y)[setkey(n, y), nomatch = 0], idx, y1)[setkey(J(idx, y, new.x = x), idx, y), `:=`(x, new.x)], ok)[list(0)]
  replications elapsed relative user.self sys.self user.child sys.child
1          100   13.21 1.000000     13.08     0.02         NA        NA
2          100   15.08 1.141559     14.76     0.06         NA        NA
> crdt(1e5)
> benchmark(fun(DT,n)[J(0)],setkey(setkey(setkey(DT,y)[setkey(n,y),nomatch=0],idx,y1)[setkey(J(idx,y,new.x=x),idx,y),x:=new.x],ok)[list(0)])
                                                                                                                                  test
1                                                                                                                     fun(DT, n)[J(0)]
2 setkey(setkey(setkey(DT, y)[setkey(n, y), nomatch = 0], idx, y1)[setkey(J(idx, y, new.x = x), idx, y), `:=`(x, new.x)], ok)[list(0)]
  replications elapsed relative user.self sys.self user.child sys.child
1          100  150.49 1.000000    148.98     0.89         NA        NA
2          100  155.33 1.032162    151.04     2.25         NA        NA
>
share|improve this answer
    
Super convoluted maybe, but that is clever and pleasantly quick on larger data (which I have!) –  Justin Sep 15 '12 at 15:33
    
@Justin Haven't had a chance to look yet, pls hold accept for a day or two ... –  Matt Dowle Sep 15 '12 at 16:46
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.