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I have PDB(text) files which are in a directory. I would like to print the number of subunits from each PDB file.

  1. Read all lines in a pdb file that start with ATOM
  2. The fifth column of the ATOM line contains A, B, C, D etc.
  3. If it contains only A the number of subunit is 1. If it contains A and B, the number of subunits are 2. If it contains A, B, and C the number of subunits are 3.

1kg2.pdb file

ATOM   1363  N   ASN A 258      82.149 -23.468   9.733  1.00 57.80           N  
ATOM   1364  CA  ASN A 258      82.494 -22.084   9.356  1.00 62.98           C  
ATOM   1395  C   MET B 196      34.816 -51.911  11.750  1.00 49.79           C  
ATOM   1396  O   MET B 196      35.611 -52.439  10.963  1.00 47.65           O  

1uz3.pdb file

ATOM   1384  O   ARG A 260      80.505 -20.450  15.420  1.00 22.10           O 
ATOM   1385  CB  ARG A 260      78.980 -18.077  15.207  1.00 36.88           C 
ATOM   1399  SD  MET B 196      34.003 -52.544  16.664  1.00 57.16           S 
ATOM   1401  N   ASP C 197      34.781 -50.611  12.007  1.00 44.30           N  

2b69.pdb file

ATOM   1393  N   MET B 196      33.300 -54.017  12.033  1.00 46.46           N  
ATOM   1394  CA  MET B 196      33.782 -52.714  12.566  1.00 49.99           C  

desired output

pdb_id   subunits

 1kg2      2
 1uz3      3
 2b69      1

How can I do this with awk, python or Biopython?

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4  
Welcome to StackOverflow! What have you tried? Have you taken a look at the Bio.PDB.PDBParser class in BioPython? There's documentation here and even a paper about it –  David Robinson Sep 15 '12 at 1:04
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can use an array to record all seen values for the fifth column.

$ gawk '/^ATOM/ {seen[$5] = 1} END {print length(seen)}' 1kg2.pdb
2

Edit: Using gawk 4.x you can use ENDFILE to generate the required output:

BEGIN {
  print "pdb_id\t\tsubunits"
  print
}

/^ATOM/ {
  seen[$5] = 1
}

ENDFILE {
  print FILENAME, "\t", length(seen)
  delete seen
}

The result:

$ gawk -f pdb.awk 1kg2.pdb 1uz3.pdb 2b69.pdb
pdb_id          subunits

1kg2.pdb         2
1uz3.pdb         3
2b69.pdb         1
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1  
The redirection isn't necessary. –  Dennis Williamson Sep 15 '12 at 17:13
    
I've removed it. –  user647772 Sep 15 '12 at 17:34
    
Thank you very much for your answer. code works only for single .I tried the following code for multiple files.gawk '/^ATOM/ {seen[$5] = 1} END {print length(seen)}' file/*.pdb.But it didn't work. How to change the code for multiple files? I also need to print the name of files with the subunits. –  user1672711 Sep 15 '12 at 23:30
1  
Try the next answer. But do a little thinking first - if you need to print the name of a file, then have you tried using a "print" statement with a "filename" (either in a shell loop around the gawk command, or in a python script)? –  Dave Sep 15 '12 at 23:44
    
@user1672711 I've edited my answer to produce the output you want with gawk 4.x. –  user647772 Sep 17 '12 at 7:07
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A dictionary is one way to count unique occurrences. The following assigns a meaningless value (0) to each subunit, since all you care about is the number of unique subunits (dictionary keys).

import os

for fn in os.listdir():
    if ".pdb" in fn:
        sub = {}
        with open(fn, 'r') as f:
            for line in f:
                c = line.split()
                if len(c) > 5 and c[0] == "ATOM":
                    sub[c[4]] = 0
        print(fn, len(sub.keys()))

(A brand new user deserves an answer along with a pointer to http://whathaveyoutried.com/. Subsequent questions should include evidence that the user has actually tried to solve the problem.)

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