Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm using the jQuery Validate plugin in conjunction with BriteVerify on my page (BriteVerify is a service that checks for known junk email addresses and other data, to prevent phony/spam signups on a form).

Note that a "valid" field (as determined by the Validate plugin) can be considered junk by BriteVerify. For example, mickeymouse@aol.com passes validation since it's a well-formed address, but BriteVerify blocks it because that account doesn't actually exist.

So, what I want to do is this: if the response from BriteVerify indicates that the email address is no good, programmatically mark the field as "invalid" (the way that the Validation plugin would do itself). See below:

jQuery.briteVerify.email(jQuery("#email").val(), function(email){
    if (email.errors) {
        // Trigger jQuery Validate's invalid appearance/error message here
    } else {
        // Do nothing - email is valid
    }
}

I hope that makes sense. Is this possible?

share|improve this question
    
This is the PHP example they have on their site. I'd say use some $.ajax to evaluate the JSON response from the server. –  elclanrs Sep 15 '12 at 3:37

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I couldn't find a way to "trigger" the field being invalid, but I was able to accomplish something equivalent like this:

jQuery.briteVerify.email(jQuery("#email").val(), function(email){
    if (email.errors) {
        msg = email.errors[0][1];
        if (!($("#email").hasClass("error"))) {
            $("#email").addClass("error").after("<label class='bv error'>" + msg + ".</label>");
        }
    } else {
        form.submit();
    }
}

So if BriteVerify doesn't like the email that was entered, and the input field doesn't already have the error class (indicating that it passed "normal" validation), then I add the class and dynamically insert the error message. Using the same classes gives it the same appearance as if Validate had marked the field invalid.

Notice how the label element has an additional bv class – this is to determine whether the error message came from Validate or from BriteVerify. So then to prevent two error messages displaying at once (one from each), I remove the BriteVerify error message (if there is one) both when the field passes "normal" validation:

$("#register").validate({
    ...
    success: function(){
        $(".bv").remove();
    }
});

And whenever a key is pressed:

$("#email").keypress(function(){
    $(".bv").remove();
});
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.