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I'm very unsure what is happening. For various lengths of @depths, the code generally works. However, throughout the output, at certain points the program barfs up complaints about use of an uninitialized value.

The errors blame line 20: print $chars[$depths[$y]];

I apologize ahead of time if it's something obvious, but I'm definitely missing the issue. I've googled for about an hour with no luck so any nudges in the right direction would be very appreciated!

Complete code:

#! /usr/bin/perl -w

use strict;
use warnings;

#my @chars  = ("0" .. "9");
#my @depths = (0) x 4;
my @chars   = ("0" .. "1");
my @depths  = (0) x 3;

my ($i, $x, $y);

for ($i = 0; $i < @chars ** @depths; $i++) {

    for ($y = 0; $y < @depths; $y++) {

        print $chars[$depths[$y]];
    }
    print"\n";

    $depths[$#depths]++;
    for($x = 0; $x < @depths; $x++) {

        if($depths[$x] == @chars) {

            $depths[$x-1]++;
            while($x < @depths) {

                $depths[$x++] = 0;
            }
        }
    }
}

Output:

000
001
010
011
Use of uninitialized value in print at a.pl line 15.
00
100
101
110
share|improve this question
    
btw, do you realize there are numerous modules (e.g. Algorithm::Loops) that provide permutation functions, and they even handle duplicates in the input? – ikegami Sep 15 '12 at 3:54
    
Line 15 in the code shown is a for loop, not a print. It is generally best to show exactly the code causing trouble, not something that's just similar to the code causing trouble. (Or futz the line number in the message so it matches the code you post.) ... Having said which, Perl (5.16.0) does say 'line 15' even though line 15 is the for loop. – Jonathan Leffler Sep 15 '12 at 3:56
    
@Jonathan Leffler, I'm the only who added the output to the OP's node, and it truly says line 15 for the error that is on line 16. (v5.14.2) – ikegami Sep 15 '12 at 4:16
    
@ikegami: It is weird! As I noted in the 'Having said which' comment, using the code as posted, Perl does indeed (mis)report the line number as 15 instead of 16. – Jonathan Leffler Sep 15 '12 at 4:18
1  
@ikegami, I'm aware of those modules, but would prefer to code this myself, given that I'm a student and would like to understand the basics before I take the easy way out. – Dan Sep 15 '12 at 4:26

I added some print statements to your code, and the problem becomes apparent.

#! /usr/bin/perl -w

use strict;
use warnings;

my @chars = ("0".."1");
my @depths = (0) x 3;

my $i;
my $x;
my $y;
for ($i = 0; $i < @chars**@depths; $i++)
{
        printf "m = %d\n", scalar(@depths);
        for ($y = 0; $y < @depths; $y++)
        {
            print "y:$y; d[y] = $depths[$y]\n";
            print " :$chars[$depths[$y]]:\n";
        }
        print"\n";

        printf "b[%d] ", $depths[$#depths];
        $depths[$#depths]++;
        printf "a[%d]\n", $depths[$#depths];
        for($x = 0; $x < @depths; $x++){
                if($depths[$x] == @chars){
                        $depths[$x-1]++;
                        while($x < @depths){
                                $depths[$x++] = 0;
                        }
                }
        }
}

The output was:

m = 3
y:0; d[y] = 0
 :0:
y:1; d[y] = 0
 :0:
y:2; d[y] = 0
 :0:

b[0] a[1]
m = 3
y:0; d[y] = 0
 :0:
y:1; d[y] = 0
 :0:
y:2; d[y] = 1
 :1:

b[1] a[2]
m = 3
y:0; d[y] = 0
 :0:
y:1; d[y] = 1
 :1:
y:2; d[y] = 0
 :0:

b[0] a[1]
m = 3
y:0; d[y] = 0
 :0:
y:1; d[y] = 1
 :1:
y:2; d[y] = 1
 :1:

b[1] a[2]
m = 3
y:0; d[y] = 0
 :0:
y:1; d[y] = 2
Use of uninitialized value within @chars in concatenation (.) or string at perm.pl line 18.
 ::
y:2; d[y] = 0
 :0:

b[0] a[1]
m = 3
y:0; d[y] = 1
 :1:
y:1; d[y] = 0
 :0:
y:2; d[y] = 0
 :0:

b[0] a[1]
m = 3
y:0; d[y] = 1
 :1:
y:1; d[y] = 0
 :0:
y:2; d[y] = 1
 :1:

b[1] a[2]
m = 3
y:0; d[y] = 1
 :1:
y:1; d[y] = 1
 :1:
y:2; d[y] = 0
 :0:

b[0] a[1]

The line immediately before the error report shows that $depths[$y] is 2, but the array @chars only contains elements with indexes 0 and 1, so the warning is accurate.

share|improve this answer

Think of @depths as a base N number (where N is the number of @chars), and each element of @depths is a digit. You're trying to add one to that number, but you're failing.

A carry propagates from the least significant digit to the most significant, so you should be the loop than handles the carry should loop from the least significant digit to the most significant, but you're doing it in the opposite order. $x should start at $#depth and decrease as the loop advances.

Let's look at an example. Say there are 10 symbols (@chars == 10):

 456999   <- @depth
+     1
-------
 457000

So you want to increment the right-most digit that's not equal to $#chars, and set to zero all the right-most digits that are equal to $#chars. Here's how I coded that:

#!/usr/bin/perl -w

use strict;
use warnings;

my @chars = ("0".."2");
my @depths = (0) x 3;

OUTER: while (1) {
   print @chars[@depths], "\n";

   my $x = $#depths;
   while ($depths[$x] == $#chars) {
      $depths[$x] = 0;
      last OUTER if $x == 0;
      --$x;
   }

   ++$depths[$x];
}
share|improve this answer
    
Elaborated the explanation of my solution. – ikegami Sep 15 '12 at 4:31
    
It also bears mentioning that the original warning signaled this algorithm bug, inasmuch as the algorithm bug caused one of the digits of @depths to be incremented out of its legal range. – darch Sep 15 '12 at 18:27

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