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I have two tables named EMPLOYEE and DEPARTMENT as follows:

CREATE table "EMPLOYEE" (
    "EMP_ID"     NUMBER,
    "ENAME"      VARCHAR2(4000),
    "SALARY"     VARCHAR2(4000),
    "COMPANY"    VARCHAR2(4000),
    "CONTACTNO." NUMBER,
    "GENDER"     CHAR(100),
    constraint  "EMPLOYEE_PK" primary key ("EMP_ID")
)

CREATE TABLE  "DEPARTMENT" 
(   
    "DEPT_ID" NUMBER, 
    "DEPT_NAME" VARCHAR2(4000), 
    "LOCATION" VARCHAR2(4000), 
    "CONTACTNO." NUMBER, 
     CONSTRAINT "DEPARTMENT_PK" PRIMARY KEY ("DEPT_ID") ENABLE
)

Now I am trying to make Emp_ID of EMPLOYEE table as primary key in EMPLOYEE table itself but it should act as a foreign key for DEPT_ID in DEPARTMENT table, please advise how to achieve this!

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closed as too localized by APC, PKM97693321, martin clayton, j0k, mu is too short Sep 17 '12 at 6:50

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3  
Presumably, this is a made-up example, right? It wouldn't make sense for there to be a foreign key relationship between the EMP_ID column in EMPLOYEE and the DEPT_ID column in DEPARTMENT. If you really had these two tables, you would want to add a DEPT_ID column to EMPLOYEE that references the DEPT_ID of DEPARTMENT. Assuming this is a made-up example, do you want the EMPLOYEE to be the parent or the child table in the foreign key relationship? –  Justin Cave Sep 15 '12 at 4:16
    
Why you should not have the department_id in the employee table ? –  GK27 Sep 15 '12 at 4:17
    
@JustinCave Employee to be parent table and it should reference as DEPARTMENT table –  Rocky Sinha Sep 15 '12 at 4:18
    
@RockySinha - The child table references the parent table. If EMPLOYEE is the parent, the foreign key must be created on the DEPARTMENT table and DEPARTMENT must reference EMPLOYEE. –  Justin Cave Sep 15 '12 at 5:08
    
You need to add an dept_id column to employee. Only then you can create a FK from dept to emp that makes sense. –  a_horse_with_no_name Sep 15 '12 at 6:53

3 Answers 3

If EMPLOYEE is to be the parent table and DEPARTMENT is to be the child table, the foreign key would need to be defined on DEPARTMENT where it references the EMP_ID in the EMPLOYEE table. The foreign key is created on the child table and references the parent table.

CREATE TABLE  "DEPARTMENT" 
(   
    "DEPT_ID" NUMBER, 
    "DEPT_NAME" VARCHAR2(4000), 
    "LOCATION" VARCHAR2(4000), 
    "CONTACTNO." NUMBER, 
     CONSTRAINT "DEPARTMENT_PK" PRIMARY KEY ("DEPT_ID") ENABLE,
     CONSTRAINT department_fk FOREIGN KEY( DEPT_ID )
       REFERENCES employee( EMP_ID )
)

Of course, given your example, defining the foreign key constraint would be a completely incorrect approach to modeling the data. It makes no sense for the set of valid department IDs to be constrained by the set of employee IDs. Defining the foreign key this way also prevents a department from ever having more than 1 employee. If you were really modelling departments and employees, you would add a DEPT_ID column to the EMPLOYEE table, the EMPLOYEE table would be the child, not the parent, and the foreign key would be defined on the EMPLOYEE table to reference the DEPARTMENT table.

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I hope this could help you

CREATE table "EMPLOYEE" (
"EMP_ID"     NUMBER,
"ENAME"      VARCHAR2(4000),
"SALARY"     VARCHAR2(4000),
"COMPANY"    VARCHAR2(4000),
"Dept_id"    NUMBER,
"CONTACTNO." NUMBER,
"GENDER"     CHAR(100),
 constraint  "EMPLOYEE_PK" primary key ("EMP_ID"),
 CONSTRAINT fk_DeptId FOREIGN KEY (Dept_Id)
 REFERENCES Department("Dept_Id") 
);
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Thanks lot dude but getting this error ..ORA-00907: missing right parenthesis ..upon executing on oracle 10g express edition –  Rocky Sinha Sep 15 '12 at 4:30
    
@Rocky Sinha Find it now, i have missed the , between the constraint it should work fine –  GK27 Sep 15 '12 at 6:08
2  
It won't work fine. You're quoting everything... you should avoid this if at all possible: Dept_Id == DEPT_ID != "Dept_Id" –  Ben Sep 15 '12 at 13:21
CREATE table "EMPLOYEE" (
    "EMP_ID"     NUMBER,
    "ENAME"      VARCHAR2(4000),
    "SALARY"     VARCHAR2(4000),
    "COMPANY"    VARCHAR2(4000),
    "CONTACTNO"  NUMBER,
    "GENDER"     CHAR(100),
    constraint  "EMPLOYEE_PK" primary key ("EMP_ID")
)


ALTER TABLE "EMPLOYEE" ADD CONSTRAINT "EMPLOYEE_FK" 
FOREIGN KEY ("EMP_ID")
REFERENCES "DEPARTMENT" ("DEPT_ID")
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1  
I don't think it makes much sense for EMP_ID to reference DEPT_ID. –  Jeffrey Kemp Sep 15 '12 at 6:47
    
While it is possible to create a constraint which requires that the EMPLOYEE.EMP_ID column contain a value which exists in the DEPARTMENT.DEPT_ID column, to my eye this is fundamentally incorrect. Put in words this says, "The ID of an employee must equal the ID of a department". Given that EMP_ID is the primary key on EMPLOYEE, this means that each EMPLOYEE must exist in its own department, and department and an employee are, in effect, synonyms. –  Bob Jarvis Sep 16 '12 at 0:05

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