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This code works perfectly, but unfortunately it triggers garbage collection because of the Arrays.sort() Comparator.

Is there a way to do this that won't trigger Garbage Collection?

(NOTE: This code has been modified to be more "generic". The actual code is for an Android game, which is why Garbage Collection-induced slowdown is an issue.)

static final byte INCOME = 0;
static final byte INDEX = 1;

public void vSortEmployees() {
    nPaidEmployees = 0;

    for (nIter=0; nIter<MAX_EMPLOYEES; nIter++) {

        if ((employees[nIter].current == true) && (employees[nIter].volunteer == false)) {

            // We have another current and paid employee; add that employee's "amount earned to date" to the list.
            paidemployees[nPaidEmployees][INCOME] = employees[nIter].fGetTotalIncomeToDate();
            paidemployees[nPaidEmployees][INDEX] = nIter;

            nPaidEmployees++;
        }
    }

    Arrays.sort(paidemployees, new Comparator<float[]>() {
        @Override
        public int compare(float[] f1, float[] f2) {
            if (f2[INCOME] < f1[INCOME]) 
                return -1;
            else if (f2[INCOME] > f1[INCOME])
                return 1;
            else
                return 0;
        }
    });

    // Now we have a list of current, paid employees in order of income received.

    // Highest income paid out
    paidemployees[0][INCOME]

    // Second highest income paid out
    paidemployees[1][INCOME]

    // If we need to reference the original employee object, we can:        
    employees[paidemployees[0][INDEX]].getName();
}
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2  
There is no possible way that the comparator there could be causing enough garbage to be your bottleneck. But in any event, why not store the Comparator in a static final field anyway? Also, why are you using arrays instead of proper Employee objects? – Louis Wasserman Sep 15 '12 at 5:55

There is not way to consistently trigger or not to trigger GC. GC lives its own life. The fact that it runs when you are sorting your array does not mean anything.

But however you probably can do something. Just do not user anonymous inner class for comparator. You do not really need this. Use regular class and create its object as a singleton. Then just use this instance. In this case no new objects will be created in your code during the sort and GC probably will not run.

class FloatArrayComparator implements Comparator<float[]>() {
    @Override
    public int compare(float[] f1, float[] f2) {
        if (f2[INCOME] < f1[INCOME]) 
            return -1;
        else if (f2[INCOME] > f1[INCOME])
            return 1;
        else
            return 0;
    }
};


class SomeClass {
    private Comparator<float[]> floatArrayComparator = new FloatArrayComparator();

    void myMethod() {
         Arrays.sort(myArray, floatArrayComparator);
    }

}
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