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I'm starting with Lisp and I have quite a problem trying to read a matrix from a file to program the A-star algorithm. The file I should read has at the top of the file the number of rows and the number of columns, and I must save both in a couple of global variables (N and M). The file format should be something like this:

ROWS
5
COLUMNS
5
MATRIX
1 1 1 1 1
1 1 0 1 1
1 1 0 0 1
1 1 0 0 1
1 1 1 0 1
START
4 2
GOAL
4 4

And my code at the moment is like this (It's probably quite lame, by the way)

(defvar *N*)
(defvar *M*)
(defvar *Goal*)
(defvar *Start*)
(defvar *Matrix*)

(defun read-matrix (file)
  (let ((in (OPEN file :DIRECTION :INPUT)))
    (read-line in nil) 
    (SETQ *N* (parse-integer (read-char in)))
    (read-line in nil)
    (read-line in nil)
    (SETQ *M* (parse-integer (read-line in)))
    (read-line in nil)
    (read-line in nil)
    (SETQ *Matrix* (MAKE-ARRAY '(*N* *M*) :initial-element 1))
    (loop for i from 0 to *N*
        do (loop for j from 0 to *M*
               do (SETF (AREF *Matrix* i j)
                    (read-char in))))
    (read-line in nil)
    (SETQ *Start* (read-line in))
    (read-line in nil)
    (SETQ *Goal* (read-line in))))

I'd be really grateful if anybody could help me.

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I'm sorry, i don't know why the format got that way. –  user1673162 Sep 15 '12 at 9:31

3 Answers 3

There are a bunch of errors.

  1. you open a stream, but never close it
  2. you call PARSE-INTEGER on a character, when it expects a string
  3. MAKE-ARRAY is called with a list of symbols, but it should be a list of numbers.

Also: using global variables is not a good idea.

share|improve this answer

First problem: you open a file, but never close it. When you use open, you need to remember to close afterwards. Since this is so common, there is with-open-file, which closes automatically (see the CLHS for documentation).

(defvar *N*)
(defvar *M*)
(defvar *Goal*)
(defvar *Start*)
(defvar *Matrix*)

(defun read-matrix (file)
  (with-open-file (in file
                      :direction :input)
    (read-line in nil) 
    (setq *N* (parse-integer (read-char in)))
    (read-line in nil)
    (read-line in nil)
    (setq *M* (parse-integer (read-line in)))
    (read-line in nil)
    (read-line in nil)
    (setq *Matrix* (make-array '(*N* *M*) :initial-element 1))
    (loop for i from 0 to *N*
        do (loop for j from 0 to *M*
               do (setf (aref *Matrix* i j)
                    (read-char in))))
    (read-line in nil)
    (setq *Start* (read-line in))
    (read-line in nil)
    (setq *Goal* (read-line in))))

Second problem: read-char returns a character, and parse-integer is not defined for a character. It seems that you can simply read the entire line.

(defvar *N*)
(defvar *M*)
(defvar *Goal*)
(defvar *Start*)
(defvar *Matrix*)

(defun read-matrix (file)
  (with-open-file (in file
                      :direction :input)
    (read-line in nil) 
    (setq *N* (parse-integer (read-line in)))
    (read-line in nil)
    (read-line in nil)
    (setq *M* (parse-integer (read-line in)))
    (read-line in nil)
    (read-line in nil)
    (setq *Matrix* (make-array '(*N* *M*) :initial-element 1))
    (loop for i from 0 to *N*
        do (loop for j from 0 to *M*
               do (setf (aref *Matrix* i j)
                    (read-char in))))
    (read-line in nil)
    (setq *Start* (read-line in))
    (read-line in nil)
    (setq *Goal* (read-line in))))

Third problem: it seems that you discard too many lines between those that you need.

(defvar *N*)
(defvar *M*)
(defvar *Goal*)
(defvar *Start*)
(defvar *Matrix*)

(defun read-matrix (file)
  (with-open-file (in file
                      :direction :input)
    (read-line in nil) ; "ROWS"
    (setq *N* (parse-integer (read-line in)))
    (read-line in nil) ; "COLUMNS"
    (setq *M* (parse-integer (read-line in)))
    (read-line in nil) ; "MATRIX"
    (setq *Matrix* (make-array '(*N* *M*) :initial-element 1))
    (loop for i from 0 to *N*
        do (loop for j from 0 to *M*
               do (setf (aref *Matrix* i j)
                    (read-char in))))
    (read-line in nil) ; "START"
    (setq *Start* (read-line in))
    (read-line in nil) ; "GOAL"
    (setq *Goal* (read-line in))))

Fourth problem: that make-array form needs numbers to set its dimensions, but you give it two symbols instead. You need to evaluate those symbols to get the values you want:

(defvar *N*)
(defvar *M*)
(defvar *Goal*)
(defvar *Start*)
(defvar *Matrix*)

(defun read-matrix (file)
  (with-open-file (in file
                      :direction :input)
    (read-line in nil) ; "ROWS"
    (setq *N* (parse-integer (read-line in)))
    (read-line in nil) ; "COLUMNS"
    (setq *M* (parse-integer (read-line in)))
    (read-line in nil) ; "MATRIX"
    (setq *Matrix* (make-array (list *N* *M*) :initial-element 1))
    (loop for i from 0 to *N*
        do (loop for j from 0 to *M*
               do (setf (aref *Matrix* i j)
                    (read-char in))))
    (read-line in nil) ; "START"
    (setq *Start* (read-line in))
    (read-line in nil) ; "GOAL"
    (setq *Goal* (read-line in))))

Fifth problem: It seems that you want your matrix to contain bits, but you only put characters into it. On top of that, your matrix will not even contain a #\1 (the character) where you expect a 1 (the number) and a #\0 where you expect a 0, but instead the following (assuming Unix-style newlines):

#2A((#\1 #\Space #\1 #\Space #\1)
    (#\Space #\1 #\Space #\1 #\Newline)
    (#\1 #\Space #\1 #\Space #\0)
    (#\Space #\1 #\Space #\1 #\Newline)
    (#\1 #\Space #\1 #\Space #\0))

To accomplish what you want, I propose to read the matrix lines, then split them on spaces and parse the fields. A handy library for that is split-sequence.

(defvar *N*)
(defvar *M*)
(defvar *Goal*)
(defvar *Start*)
(defvar *Matrix*)

(defun read-matrix (file)
  (with-open-file (in file
                      :direction :input)
    (read-line in nil) ; "ROWS"
    (setq *N* (parse-integer (read-line in)))
    (read-line in nil) ; "COLUMNS"
    (setq *M* (parse-integer (read-line in)))
    (read-line in nil) ; "MATRIX"
    (setq *Matrix* (make-array (list *N* *M*) :initial-element 1))
    (loop :for i :from 0 :to *N*
          :do (let* ((line (read-line in))
                     (fields (split-sequence:split-sequence #\Space line))))
                (loop :for field :in fields
                      :for j :upfrom 0
                      :do (setf (aref *matrix* i j)
                                (parse-integer field))))
    (read-line in nil) ; "START"
    (setq *Start* (read-line in))
    (read-line in nil) ; "GOAL"
    (setq *Goal* (read-line in))))

At this point, this should "work", for some value of "work" (I have not tested it, though).

However, the use of global variables for transfer of information has been established as uncouth about 30 years ago. The first step of bringing this to a style more suitable for a robust program would be to return the values from the function instead.

(defun read-matrix (file)
  (let (n m goal start matrix)
    (with-open-file (in file
                        :direction :input)
      (read-line in nil) ; "ROWS"
      (setf n (parse-integer (read-line in)))
      (read-line in nil) ; "COLUMNS"
      (setf m (parse-integer (read-line in)))
      (read-line in nil) ; "MATRIX"
      (setf matrix (make-array (list n m) :initial-element 1))
      (loop :for i :from 0 :to n
            :do (let* ((line (read-line in))
                       (fields (split-sequence:split-sequence #\Space line))))
                  (loop :for field :in fields
                        :for j :upfrom 0
                        :do (setf (aref matrix i j)
                                  (parse-integer field))))
      (read-line in nil) ; "START"
      (setf start (read-line in))
      (read-line in nil) ; "GOAL"
      (setf goal (read-line in)))
    (values n m goal start matrix)))

I think that what you really need is a struct or class for what you are reading in here. It might be called game-state.

(defclass game-state ()
  ((rows :accessor rows :initarg :rows)
   (columns :accessor columns :initarg :columns)
   (goal :accessor goal :initarg :goal)
   (start :accessor start :initarg :start)
   (board :accessor board :initarg board)))

Your function should then be named read-game-state and return an object of this class.

share|improve this answer

Something to get you started:

(defvar *rows*)
(defvar *columns*)
(defvar *goal*)
(defvar *start*)
(defvar *matrix*)

(defun parse-sequence (tokens parser &key (delimiter #\Space))
  (do ((start 0)
       (end (position delimiter tokens :start 0)
            (position delimiter tokens :start start))
       result)
      ;; you could also read from end to avoid reversing
      ;; I just find this to be more natural
      ((null end)
       (reverse
        (cons
         (funcall parser
                  (subseq tokens start (length tokens)))
                 result)))
    (setf result
          (cons (funcall parser
                         (subseq tokens start end)) result))
    (setf start (1+ end))))

(defun parse-matrix-source (file)
  (with-open-file (stream file :direction :input)
    (do ((line (read-line stream nil :eof)
               (read-line stream nil :eof))
         (matrix-row 0)
         (matrix-column 0 0)
         state)
        ((eq line :eof))
      (cond
        ((string= line "ROWS") (setf state '*rows*))
        ((string= line "COLUMNS") (setf state '*columns*))
        ((string= line "MATRIX") (setf state '*matrix*))
        ((string= line "START") (setf state '*start*))
        ((string= line "GOAL") (setf state '*goal*))
        ((eq state '*rows*) (setf *rows* (parse-integer line)))
        ((eq state '*columns*)
         (setf *columns* (parse-integer line)
               *matrix* (make-array (list *rows* *columns*)
                                    :initial-element 0)))
        ((eq state '*matrix*)
         (dolist (i (parse-sequence line 'parse-integer))
           (setf (aref *matrix* matrix-column matrix-row) i
                 matrix-column (1+ matrix-column)))
         (incf matrix-row))
        ((eq state '*start*)
         (setf *start* (parse-sequence line 'parse-integer)))
        ((eq state '*goal*)
         (setf *goal* (parse-sequence line 'parse-integer)))))))

(defun test-parse-matrix ()
  (parse-matrix-source #P"~/Projects/lisp-doodles/matrix.txt")
  (format t "rows: ~d, columns: ~d, goal: ~s, start: ~s~& matrix: ~s~&"
          *rows* *columns*  *goal* *start* *matrix*))

(test-parse-matrix)

But I would think about a better format - in which case you have a good chance of finding a library that is already able to parse it + will allow for more flexibility in the future. Even CSV or INI would be better then what you have now.

share|improve this answer
    
I've been using cl-csv over the last few days. It seems to scale very well, and handle all of those special characters/corner cases. Not that you'd have any here, but I'd give that package a +1 for robustness and efficiency –  Clayton Stanley Sep 15 '12 at 22:19

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