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What are the main differences, if any, of Python's argument passing rules vs C#'s argument passing rules?

I'm very familiar with Python and only starting to learn C#. I was wondering if I could think of the rule set as to when an object is passed by reference or by value the same for C# as it is in Python, or if there are some key differences I need to keep in mind.

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passed by reference in python, from when???? –  user1655481 Sep 15 '12 at 14:23
    
Python passes reference to objects by value: link –  Max Sep 15 '12 at 14:40
    
I know you must be talking about some list appending, I haven't seen the link but I guess it must be.... –  user1655481 Sep 15 '12 at 14:43
    
@Max: Right. But passing the reference value simply means passing by reference. Simply said, 4 bytes are passed, and the bytes are the address of the object that is passed by reference. –  pepr Sep 15 '12 at 15:00
    
@pepr No, that is not pass by reference. The "reference" in "pass by reference" refers to a different concept, namely to something which allows you to manipulate storage locations (variables, object attributes, slots in collections, etc.) and does not exist in Python. Pass by reference permits def f(x): x = whatever to have an effect. –  delnan Sep 15 '12 at 16:01

6 Answers 6

up vote 6 down vote accepted

C# passes parameters by value unless you specify that you want it differently. If the parameter type is a struct, its value is copied, otherwise the reference to the object is copied. The same goes for return values.

You can modify this behavior using the ref or out modifier, which must be specified both in the method declaration and in the method call. Both change the behavior for that parameter to pass-by-reference. That means you can no longer pass in more complex expressions. The difference between ref and out is that when passing a variable to a ref parameter, it must have been initialized already, while a variable passed to an out parameter doesn't have to be initialized. In the method, the out parameter is treated as uninitialized variable and must be assigned a value before returning.

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1  
About ref, OP may find this question interesting. –  Şafak Gür Sep 15 '12 at 14:55
    
Selected as the answer since it's the only one that's telling me about how passing parameters in C# works. –  Max Sep 15 '12 at 16:20

Python is always pass-by-value:

def is_python_pass_by_value(foo):
    foo[0] = 'More precisely, for reference types it is call-by-object-sharing, which is a special case of pass-by-value.'
    foo = ['Python is not pass-by-reference.']

quux = ['Yes, of course, Python *is* pass-by-value!']

is_python_pass_by_value(quux)

print(quux[0])
# More precisely, for reference types it is call-by-object-sharing, which is a special case of pass-by-value.

C# is pass-by-value by default, but also supports pass-by-reference if both at the method declaration site and at the call site the ref keyword is used:

struct MutableCell
{
    public string value;
}

class Program
{
    static void IsCSharpPassByValue(string[] foo, MutableCell bar, ref string baz, ref MutableCell qux)
    {
        foo[0] = "More precisely, for reference types it is call-by-object-sharing, which is a special case of pass-by-value.";
        foo = new string[] { "C# is not pass-by-reference." };

        bar.value = "For value types, it is *not* call-by-sharing.";
        bar = new MutableCell { value = "And also not pass-by-reference." };

        baz = "It also supports pass-by-reference if explicitly requested.";

        qux = new MutableCell { value = "Pass-by-reference is supported for value types as well." };
    }

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var quux = new string[] { "Yes, of course, C# *is* pass-by-value!" };

        var corge = new MutableCell { value = "For value types it is pure pass-by-value." };

        var grault = "This string will vanish because of pass-by-reference.";

        var garply = new MutableCell { value = "This string will vanish because of pass-by-reference." };

        IsCSharpPassByValue(quux, corge, ref grault, ref garply);

        Console.WriteLine(quux[0]);
        // More precisely, for reference types it is call-by-object-sharing, which is a special case of pass-by-value.

        Console.WriteLine(corge.value);
        // For value types it is pure pass-by-value.

        Console.WriteLine(grault);
        // It also supports pass-by-reference if explicitly requested.

        Console.WriteLine(garply.value);
        // Pass-by-reference is supported for value types as well.
    }
}

As you can see, without explicit annotation with the ref keyword, C# behaves exactly like Python. Value types are pass-by-value where the value being passed is the object itself, Reference types are pass-by-value where the value being passed is a pointer to the object (also known as call-by-object-sharing).

Python does not support mutable value types (probably a good thing), so it is impossible to observe the distinction between pass-value-by-value and pass-pointer-by-value, so you can just treat everything as pass-pointer-by-value and greatly simplify your mental model.

C# also supports out parameters. They are also pass-by-reference, but it is guaranteed that the callee will never read from them, only write, so the caller does not need to initialize them beforehand. They are used to simulate multiple return values, when you would use a tuple in Python. They are kind-of like one-way pass-by-reference.

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2  
But keep in mind, that even if Python uses pass-by-value, you can change input parameters if they are complex types like dict. Changing them inside your function will change the original value. –  Gregor Sep 15 '12 at 14:27
2  
@Gregor: Well, that's just mutable state. If you mutate a mutable object, it changes, there's nothing surprising there. Python is not a purely functional language, and neither is C#. –  Jörg W Mittag Sep 15 '12 at 14:30
1  
@JörgWMittag: Python never uses pass by value. The opposite is true. –  pepr Sep 15 '12 at 14:47
2  
@Max: The difference between reference types (instances of classes) and value types (instances of structs) is not how they are passed but what is passed: for reference types the value being passed is (a copy of) a pointer to the object, for value types the value being passed is (a copy of) the object itself. This is completely orthogonal to pass-by-value vs. pass-by-reference: you can pass reference types by value (the default) or value types by reference. –  Jörg W Mittag Sep 15 '12 at 15:04
3  
In python, values are sorta-kinda passed in by reference. Python assignment doesn't replace the referenced object, it creates a new reference and stores the latter. Python values (objects) themselves live on a heap. –  Martijn Pieters Sep 15 '12 at 15:06

Not so different

def func(a,b):
    a[0]=5 #Python
    b=30

public int func( ref int a,out int b,int d)
{
  a++;b--;  //C#
}

x=[10]
y=20
func(20,30) #python 
print x,y   #Outputs x=[5],y=20 Note:I have used mutable objects.Not possible with int.

int x=10,y=20;
func(ref x,out y,18); //C# 
Console.Writeline("x={0} y={1}",x,y);//Outputs x=11,y=19
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1  
@downvoter :- have you some got some explanation???? –  user1655481 Sep 15 '12 at 14:46

Python always uses pass by reference values. There is no exception. Any variable assignment means assigning the reference value. No exception. Any variable is the name bound to the reference value. Always.

You can think about reference as about the address of the target object that is automatically dereferenced when used. This way it seems you work directly with the target object. But there always is a reference in between, one step more to jump to the target.

Updated -- here is a wanted example that proves passing by reference:

Illustrated example of passing the argument

If the argument were passed by value, the outer lst could not be modified. The green are the target objects (the black is the value stored inside, the red is the object type), the yellow is the memory with the reference value inside -- drawn as the arrow. The blue solid arrow is the reference value that was passed to the function (via the dashed blue arrow path). The uggly dark yellow is the internal dictionary. (It actually could be drawn also as a green elipse. The colour and the shape only says it is internal.)

Updated -- related to fgb's comment on passing by reference example swap(a, b) and the delnan's comment on imposibility to write the swap.

In compiled languages, variable is a memory space that is capable to capture the value of the type. In Python, variable is a name (captured internally as a string) bound to the reference variable that holds the reference value to the target object. The name of the variable is the key in the internal dictionary, the value part of that dictionary item stores the reference value to the target.

The purpose of the swap in other languages is to swap the content of the passed variables, i.e. swap the content of the memory spaces. This can be done also for Python, but only for variables that can be modified--meaning the content of their memory space can be modified. This holds only for modifiable container types. A simple variable in that sense is always constant, even though its name can be reused for another purpose.

If the function should create some new object, the only way to get it outside is or via a container type argument, or via the Python return command. However, the Python return syntactically look as if it was able to pass outside more than one argument. Actually, the multiple values passed outside form a tuple, but the tuple can be syntactically assigned to more outer Python variables.

Update related to the simulation of variables as they are perceived in other languages. The memory space is simulated by a single-element lists -- i.e. one more level of indirection. Then the swap(a, b) can be written as in other languages. The only strange thing is that we have to use the element of the list as the reference to the value of the simulated variable. The reason for neccessity to simulate the other-languate variables this way is that only containers (a subset of them) are the only objects in Python that can be modified:

>>> def swap(a, b):
...   x = a[0]
...   a[0] = b[0]
...   b[0] = x
...
>>> var1 = ['content1']
>>> var2 = ['content2']
>>> var1
['content1']
>>> var2
['content2']
>>> id(var1)
35956296L
>>> id(var2)
35957064L
>>> swap(var1, var2)
>>> var1
['content2']
>>> var2
['content1']
>>> id(var1)
35956296L
>>> id(var2)
35957064L

Notice that the now the var1 and var2 simulate the look of "normal" variables in classic languages. The swap changes their content, but the addresses remain the same.

For modifiable object--as the lists are for example--you can write exactly the same swap(a, b) as in other languages:

>>> def swap(a, b):
...   x = a[:]
...   a[:] = b[:]
...   b[:] = x[:]
...
>>> lst1 = ['a1', 'b1', 'c1']
>>> lst2 = ['a2', 'b2', 'c2']
>>> lst1
['a1', 'b1', 'c1']
>>> lst2
['a2', 'b2', 'c2']
>>> id(lst1)
35957320L
>>> id(lst2)
35873160L
>>> swap(lst1, lst2)
>>> lst1
['a2', 'b2', 'c2']
>>> lst2
['a1', 'b1', 'c1']
>>> id(lst1)
35957320L
>>> id(lst2)
35873160L

Notice that the multiple assignment like a[:] = b[:] must be used to express copying of the content of the lists.

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1  
The one that downvoted is malevolent or mistaken or he/she does not know Python. It can be proven by examples that what I say is true. However, you cannot prove that Python passes by value. –  pepr Sep 15 '12 at 14:54
1  
@JonSkeet: Even though the referenced question says otherwise, it is very cofusing. It is a play on the words whether passing by reference means passing the reference value. Of course. But the reference value is just the address of the object. Passing by reference means passing the address of the object. This way is used also in Python. Passing the argument to the function actually means assigning the local variable of the function the thing from outside. This is the same kind of assignment as any other assignment in Python. –  pepr Sep 15 '12 at 15:12
1  
If it's the same kind of assignment as any other, then it's pass-by-value. Pass-by-reference means that the passed/local variables are references to each other. Any change to the variables (including assignment) has the same effect no matter which variable is used. –  fgb Sep 15 '12 at 15:19
3  
@pepr: You wrote: "Any assignment in Python means copying a reference to the target object." Well, that's the definition of pass-by-value. –  Jörg W Mittag Sep 15 '12 at 15:26
4  
@pepr: Because the reference would be passed by value - that's exactly the way that C# and Java works. To be honest, I'm coming to the conclusion that the traditional terminology of "pass by value" and "pass by reference" may simply be unhelpful for Python. It's easy to see how they work for C# and Java (as examples I'm familiar with) as the value of a variable is very clearly defined - whereas in Python there's the binding and the variable, which sound like they're different things, introducing confusion... –  Jon Skeet Sep 15 '12 at 17:03

For a reminder of the difference between passing by reference and passing by value, the following program is provided to demonstrate the difference between the two: example program in C

Now let us see how Python does it: example program in Python If you sufficiently understand what is going on, Python passes by reference but rebinds variable names (causing some confusion).

To further prove that Python uses pass-by-reference, take note of how to mutate a float in the language.

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Arguments are always passed by value in C, and passing a pointer to some variable is not the same as passing the variable by reference. Your python example demonstrates that arguments are passed by value, since the assignment to data does not affect the parameter passed into the function. –  Lee Sep 15 '12 at 19:12
    
My +1. @Lee: Notice that the address of the variable outside the call is the same as the address of the internal data after entering the body of the function (in Python). This can never happen when passing by value. When passing by value say in C, the value is pushed to the stack; hence it has a different address. The problem is that assignment is not the same in C and in Python even though it looks syntactically the same. A pointer is not automatically dereferenced. This way, it is a minor syntactic difference from a reference in this case. –  pepr Sep 15 '12 at 23:45
1  
Forget the syntax. If arguments were passed by value, "how to mutate a float" would not work. –  Noctis Skytower Sep 16 '12 at 17:54

The problem with calling Python a "pass-by-value" or "pass-by-reference" language and comparing to C, C#, etc. is that Python has a different conception of how data is referred to. Python does not fit easily into a conventional by-value or by-reference dichotomy, leading to confusion and the "It's call-by-value!" "No, it's call-by-reference, and I can prove it!" "NO, YOU MAROON, it's obviously call-by-value!" endless loop witnessed above.

The truth is, it's neither. Python uses call-by-sharing (aka call-by-object). Sometimes this appears to be a by-value strategy (e.g. when dealing with scalar values like int, float, and str), and sometimes like a by-reference strategy (e.g. when dealing with structured values like list, dict, set, and object). David Goodger's Code like a Pythonista sums this up beautifully as "other languages have variables; Python has names." As a bonus, he provides clear graphics illustrating the difference.

Under the covers, call-by-sharing is implemented more like call-by-reference (as the mutate a float example mentioned by Noctis Skytower demonstrates.) But if you think of it as call-by-reference, you will go off the tracks rapidly, because while references are the implementation, they're not the exposed semantics.

C#, in contrast, uses either call-by-value or call-by-reference--though one might argue that the out option represents a tweak above-and-beyond pure call-by-reference as seen in C, Pascal, etc.

So Python and C# are very different indeed--at an architectural level, at any rate. In practice, the combination of by-value and by-reference would allow you to create programs that operate very similarly to call-by-sharing--albeit with a tricky little Devil living in the details and corner-cases.

If you're interested in understanding different languages' parameter passing strategies in a comparative context, Wikipedia's page on expression evaluation strategy is worth a read. While it's not exhaustive (there are many ways to skin this particular cat!), it ably covers a range of the most important ones, plus some interesting uncommon variations.

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1  
call-by-sharing is simply the name given by Barbara Liskov for the specific kind of pass-by-value (where the value being passed is always implicitly a pointer) implemented in CLU and later in languages like Smalltalk, Objective-C, Java, C#, Python, Ruby, Self, Newspeak, Io, Ioke, Seph and so forth. Call-by-sharing is pass-by-value. And it is what Java and by default C# use as well, at least for reference types. –  Jörg W Mittag Sep 15 '12 at 21:32
2  
My +1 @JörgWMittag: The problem with that is that you think about the variable and name it after the passing the address. But the address is not the argument value. Also, when passing arguments that occupy a lot of memory, the pass-by-value means copying that big amount of memory. Historically, pass by reference as the opposite was or used to avoid copying, or to allow the output through modification of the passed variable. –  pepr Sep 15 '12 at 22:52
2  
Sure, Python is call-by-value. In exactly the same way that all call-by-reference is really call-by-value. At the CPU register level, everything is a value. Even references. "Ha! Call-by-value! Call-by-value! QED!" Next, let's have the debate where objects are nothing more than a little sugar-coating on Turing Machines. On second thought--no. Let's be serious. When we organize things for different intent and effect, we give them different names to signify the different semantics and outcomes. Call-by-{reference,sharing,copy-back,etc.} are NOT usefully reducible to call-by-value. –  Jonathan Eunice Sep 16 '12 at 3:28
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Python and C# (without using ref or out) exhibit the exact same semantics. So, why is C# pass-by-value and Python isn't? –  Jörg W Mittag Sep 16 '12 at 8:05
    
@JonathanEunice: Thank you for adding your explanation on how Python really works. It is a great insight to realize that pass-by-reference is actually a form of pass-by-value. As you pointed out, it is "NOT usefully reducible to call-by-value." –  Noctis Skytower Sep 18 '12 at 16:50

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