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Which of the new HTML5 elements should be used instead of div.container and div.content ?

<header>
  site header
</header>

<div class="container">

  <div class="content">

    <article>
      content
    </article>

    <article>
      content
    </article>

    <article>
      content
    </article>

  </div>

  <aside>
    sidebar
  <aside> 

</div>

<footer>
  site footer
</footer>
share|improve this question
    
There is a new proposal for a <maincontent> element at html5accessibility.com/tests/maincontent.html . It is is the matter of much dispute, for example, see brucelawson.co.uk/2012/scooby-doo-content-element . Even if it comes to pass, it will not be part of HTML5, but of whatever follows HTML5. In the meantime, follow Matt Whipple's advice to use role="main". – Alohci Sep 15 '12 at 15:28
up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can't answer this example in general, it depends on the content of the page.

What matters here is the outline of your page. Therefor, you can ignore all div elements as they don't influence the outline. Only use them if you need them as hooks for CSS or JavaScript.

The first question would be: Is the aside related to the whole page or is it related to the "content area"? If it is related to the whole page, it must not be included in another sectioning element. If it is related to the content area, it has to be included in that sectioning element. Here I assume that it is related to the whole web page.

The second question: Is there a common heading for the three article elements? Examples would be: "My favorite books", "Latest blog posts", or "Products". If so, you should use a sectioning element which groups these three article elements. If there would be no possible heading, you probably don't want a sectioning element here, so could use div or not element at all.

The third question (if the second question was answered positively): Should this sectioning element be an section or an article element? If your choice of using the article element for these three "things" is correct, you probably (but not inevitably!) need a section here. Whether it was correct at all to use article, again, depends on the real content. So it could be possible that you rather want

<article> 
  <section></section>
  <section></section>
  <section></section>
</article>

instead of

<section> 
  <article></article>
  <article></article>
  <article></article>
</section>

Here I assume that your choice of using article for the three "things" is correct.

So the final version might look like:

<header>
  <!-- if this header applies to the whole page -->
</header>

<section>

  <!-- a h1 like "Latest blog posts" -->

    <article>
      content
    </article>

    <article>
      content
    </article>

    <article>
      content
    </article>

</section>

<aside>
    <!-- if this aside applies to the whole page -->
<aside> 

<footer>
  <!-- if this footer applies to the whole page -->
</footer>
share|improve this answer

div.content can probably be a <section>. div.container should probably remain a div.

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None of them are made for that. I'd recommend using ARIA roles however.

<div class="container" role="document">

  <div class="content" role="main">

These can then also be used in CSS with selectors like div[role='main']

share|improve this answer

I highly recommend reading about the differences between article and section over at HTML 5 DOCTOR.

You will then be able to make an informed judgment about which sectioning elements should be used and when, and also when not to use div.

What I have surmised from their blog is that:

article: Used for content which will make sense on its own!

section: for content which is a logical section of either another section or an article (fine to nest these).

div: still used for containers or as hooks for styling, which is something html5 elements should not be used for.

Finally the decision of using html5 sectioning elements can often be decided by the fact that it contains a heading (although this is not a hard and fast rule). There are a couple of useful tools to aid these decisions.

HTML5 Outliner - online

HTML5 Outliner - chrome extension

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To consider this question as a constructive question, it needs to be interpreted as asking what the HTML5 drafts say about the matter. Then the answer is section 4.13.1 The main part of the content in the W3C HTML5 draft. To put it briefly, it says that normally you don’t need any specific markup: just put the content there. Obviously, you can wrap it in a div element if you need to treat it as a unit in CSS or in scripting.

And according to that section, it could be marked up as section or article if it constitutes “a section of a larger work, for instance a chapter” or “an independent unit of content that one could imagine syndicating independently”, respectively.

This is a matter of coding style. No general-purpose software (like browser or search engine) cares about your choice here.

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