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I have an application that raises events depending on the state of a Sim object. In particular, if the state of the Sim changes - i.e. from PinRequired to Accessible - an OnStatus event will be raised. The events notify listeners on a new thread.

I am using Moq in my unit tests and am able to assert that OnStatus is raised like so:

        [Test]
    public void TestOnStatusIsRaised()
    {
        Sim sim = new Sim();

        sim.OnStatus += OnStatus;

        lock (this)
        {
            sim.UpdateSimInfo(new Info("a new status"));
            Monitor.Wait(this);
        }

        Assert.IsTrue(_onStatusCalled);
    }

    private void OnStatus(SimStatus obj)
    {
        lock (this)
        {
            _onStatusCalled = true;
            Monitor.Pulse(this);
        }
    }

As you can see, using the Monitor class I can wait until the event is raised before proceeding and asserting that the _onStatusCalled flag has been set to true.

My difficulty arises when I want to assert that an event is not raised. I can't use Monitor to wait for the event not to be raised as the test would wait forever! I could added a timeout to the wait, but that seems like a dirty hack.

I have tried the following:

        [Test]
    public void TestOnStatusIsNotFired()
    {
        Sim sim = new Sim();
        sim.OnStatus += onStatus => Assert.Fail("OnStatus Was called");

        sim.UpdateSimInfo(new Info("the same status"));
    }

but it doesn't work - before fixing the code to ensure the event is not raised, the test always passes. I have even stepped through the code and observed an exception being thrown by the Assert.Fail(), but this does not cause the test to fail as my event is raised in a try/catch block and the NUnit exception is caught.

Any ideas?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

In short, you don't unit-test multi-threading code. You split it into single-threaded parts and test each one separately.

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That would leave a hole in my testing. I can unit test that my Sim object is updated correctly - surely there must be a pattern for test whether observers are/are not informed, even if it's not called "unit testing". –  barry Sep 15 '12 at 17:06
1  
@barry The pattern is simple: you move multithreading into another module (let's call it dispatcher), then you test that your Sim calls or doesn't call mocked dispatcher (it all happens synchronously so it's easy), that you test that real dispatcher dispatches events when called. Separation of concerns at work. –  Serg Rogovtsev Sep 15 '12 at 18:34
    
Thanks Serg, that sounds sensible –  barry Sep 16 '12 at 6:49

What if you had an event for NoStatus also.

[Test]
public void TestOnStatusIsNotFired()
{
    Sim sim = new Sim();
    var mre = new ManualResetEvent(false);
    sim.OnStatus += onStatus => { mre.Set(); Assert.Fail("OnStatus Was called");}
    sim.NoStatus += () => { mre.Set();}

    sim.UpdateSimInfo(new Info("the same status"));
    mre.WaitOne()
}
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I don't really want to add an event to my application code if possible. Also, this still relies on Assert.Fail() causing the test to fail which it doesn't. –  barry Sep 15 '12 at 15:17

How about using something like:

mock.Verify(foo => foo.Execute("ping"), Times.Never());

You can also verify that OnStatus has been called with:

mock.Verify(foo => foo.Execute("ping"), Times.AtLeastOnce());

try this link for lots of good short samples: http://code.google.com/p/moq/wiki/QuickStart

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Would this work reliably in a multi threaded environment? I mean, at what point is the verify called. Is it possible that onstatus could be called after we've verified that it hasn't been called? –  barry Sep 15 '12 at 17:03

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