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This code is used to demonstrate double-checked-locking anti-pattern:

@NotThreadSafe
public class DoubleCheckedLocking {
    private static Resource resource;

    public static Resource getInstance() {
        if (resource == null) {
            synchronized (DoubleCheckedLocking.class) {
                if (resource == null)
                    resource = new Resource();
            }
        }
        return resource;
    }
}

Can I just avoid this problem by modify it to:

@NotThreadSafe
public class DoubleCheckedLocking {
    private static Resource resource;

    public static Resource getInstance() {
        if (resource == null) {
            synchronized (DoubleCheckedLocking.class) {
                if (resource == null){
                    Resource r=new Resource();
                    resource = r;
                }
            }
        }
        return resource;
    }
}

As far as I know,

Resource r=new Resource();
resource = r;

That compiler should provide happen-before relationship for that.

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Although this is not the standard pattern, your question was interesting (I think your proposed modification makes sense and does solve the issue). It would have been great to leave it open a little to get more specific answers. –  assylias Sep 15 '12 at 16:12
    
What exactly does the book say is wrong with the example? –  ninjalj Sep 15 '12 at 16:16
    
@ninjalj The main issue with the first idiom is not the risk of having the resource created twice, but the risk of returning a reference to a partially constructed object. In the second example, there still is a risk of having a resource constructed twice, but I think the possibility of seeing a partially constructed object has been removed. –  assylias Sep 15 '12 at 16:18
1  
@assylias: no, it isn't removed. The thread that sees resource != null has not executed any synchronization (possibly implying CPU and/or compiler barriers) to wait for visibility of things resource depends on. –  ninjalj Sep 15 '12 at 16:22
1  
@assylias: the reference assignment itself is atomic, e.g: you won't end up with half a reference, but the constructed object may not be visible to other threads just yet, that may require barriers. –  ninjalj Sep 15 '12 at 16:44

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

As far as I know, the only known implementation of the double-checked locking pattern that works (for JDK5 and above) makes use of the 'volatile' keyword. See Fixing Double-Checked Locking using Volatile

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That does not really answer the question. –  assylias Sep 15 '12 at 15:56
2  
I reopen this thread to allow people to discuss. I'll accept later. –  Temple Wing Sep 15 '12 at 16:23
public static Resource getInstance() {
    if (resource == null) {
        synchronized (DoubleCheckedLocking.class) {
            if (resource == null){
                Resource r=new Resource();
                resource = r;
            }
        }
    }
    return resource;
}

The only thing that guarantees proper visibility between threads is creating synchronizes-with relationships via synchronization (via synchronized, volatile, ...).

If you don't have a synchronizes-with relationship, a thread is not required to see modifications from other threads.

In this case, a thread may create a Resource and store a reference to it in resource. Then a second thread may enter getInstance(), and see resource != null. This second thread is not guaranteed to see all the effects of resource's constructions, since it isn't synchronized-with the first thread.

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The compiler is allowed to optimise:

Resource r=new Resource();
resource = r;

to

resource=new Resource();

so your adjustment is ineffective.

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