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Take a look at the following two methods:

public static void foo() {
    try {
        foo();
    } finally {
        foo();
    }
}

public static void bar() {
    bar();
}

Running bar() clearly results in a StackOverflowError, but running foo() does not (the program just seems to run indefinitely). Why is that?

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11  
Formally, the program will eventually stop because errors thrown during the processing of the finally clause will propagate to the next level up. But don't hold your breath; the number of steps taken will be about 2 to the (maximum stack depth) and the throwing of exceptions isn't exactly cheap either. –  Donal Fellows Sep 15 '12 at 16:41
2  
It would be "correct" for bar(), though. –  dan04 Sep 15 '12 at 16:47
5  
@dan04: Java doesn't do TCO, IIRC to ensure having full stack traces, and for something related to reflection (probably having to do with stack traces as well). –  ninjalj Sep 15 '12 at 16:47
3  
Interestingly enough when I tried this out on .Net (using Mono), the program crashed with a StackOverflow error without ever calling finally. –  Kibbee Sep 15 '12 at 18:55
5  
This is about the worst piece of code I ever saw :) –  aoeu Sep 16 '12 at 9:49
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5 Answers

up vote 268 down vote accepted

It doesn't run forever. Each stack overflow causes the code to move to the finally block. The problem is that it will take a really, really long time. The order of time is O(2^N) where N is the maximum stack depth.

Imagine the maximum depth is 5

foo() calls
    foo() calls
       foo() calls
           foo() calls
              foo() which fails to call foo()
           finally calls
              foo() which fails to call foo()
       finally
           foo() calls
              foo() which fails to call foo()
           finally calls
              foo() which fails to call foo()
    finally calls
       foo() calls
           foo() calls
              foo() which fails to call foo()
           finally calls
              foo() which fails to call foo()
       finally
           foo() calls
              foo() which fails to call foo()
           finally calls
              foo() which fails to call foo()
finally calls
    foo() calls
       foo() calls
           foo() calls
              foo() which fails to call foo()
           finally calls
              foo() which fails to call foo()
       finally
           foo() calls
              foo() which fails to call foo()
           finally calls
              foo() which fails to call foo()
    finally calls
       foo() calls
           foo() calls
              foo() which fails to call foo()
           finally calls
              foo() which fails to call foo()
       finally
           foo() calls
              foo() which fails to call foo()
           finally calls
              foo() which fails to call foo()

To work each level into the finally block take twice as long an the stack depth could be 10,000 or more. If you can make 10,000,000 calls per second, this will take 10^3003 seconds or longer than the age of the universe.

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3  
Can you show the tree for maximum depth of 5? –  oldrinb Sep 15 '12 at 17:02
1  
Nice, even if I try to make the stack as small as possible via -Xss, I get a depth of [150 - 210], so 2^n ends up being a [47 - 65] digits number. Not going to wait that long, that is near enough to infinity for me. –  ninjalj Sep 15 '12 at 17:05
44  
@oldrinb Just for you, I increased the depth to 5. ;) –  Peter Lawrey Sep 15 '12 at 17:18
3  
So, at the end of the day when foo finally does terminate, it will result in a StackOverflowError? –  arshajii Sep 15 '12 at 21:29
3  
following the math, yup. the last stack overflow from the last finally which failed to stack overflow will exit with... stack overflow =P. couldn't resist. –  WhozCraig Sep 15 '12 at 23:13
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When you get an exception from the invocation of foo() inside the try, you call foo() from finally and start recursing again. When that causes another exception, you'll call foo() from another inner finally(), and so on almost ad infinitum.

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3  
Presumably, a StackOverflowError (SOE) is sent when there is no more space on the stack to call new methods. How can foo() be called from finally after a SOE? –  assylias Sep 15 '12 at 16:02
    
@assylias read up on finally semantics. –  oldrinb Sep 15 '12 at 16:07
3  
@assylias: if there's not enough space, you will return from the latest foo() invocation, and invoke foo() in the finally block of your current foo() invocation. –  ninjalj Sep 15 '12 at 16:10
    
+1 to ninjalj. You will not call foo from anywhere once you cannot call foo due to the overflow condition. this includes from the finally block, which is why this will, eventually (age of the universe) terminate. –  WhozCraig Sep 16 '12 at 6:00
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Try running the following code:

    try {
        throw new Exception("TEST!");
    } finally {
        System.out.println("Finally");
    }

You will find that the finally block executes before throwing an Exception up to the level above it. (Output:

Finally

Exception in thread "main" java.lang.Exception: TEST! at test.main(test.java:6)

This makes sense, as finally is called right before exiting the method. This means, however, that once you get that first StackOverflowError, it will try to throw it, but the finally must execute first, so it runs foo() again, which gets another stack overflow, and as such runs finally again. This keeps happening forever, so the exception is never actually printed.

In your bar method however, as soon as the exception occurs, it is just thrown straight up to the level above, and will be printed

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Learn to trace your program:

public static void foo(int x) {
    System.out.println("foo " + x);
    try {
        foo(x+1);
    } 
    finally {
        System.out.println("Finally " + x);
        foo(x+1);
    }
}

This is the output I see:

[...]
foo 3439
foo 3440
foo 3441
foo 3442
foo 3443
foo 3444
Finally 3443
foo 3444
Finally 3442
foo 3443
foo 3444
Finally 3443
foo 3444
Finally 3441
foo 3442
foo 3443
foo 3444
[...]

As you can see the StackOverFlow is thrown at some layers above, so you can do additional recursion steps till you hit another exception, and so on. This is an infinite "loop".

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9  
it's not actually infinite loop, if you're patient enough it will eventually terminate. I won't hold my breath for it though. –  Lie Ryan Sep 15 '12 at 17:19
2  
I would posit that it is infinite. Each time it reaches the maximum stack depth it throws an exception and unwinds the stack. However in the finally it calls Foo again causing it to again reuse the stack space it has just recovered. It will go back and forth throwing exceptions and then going back Dow the stack until it happens again. Forever. –  Kibbee Sep 15 '12 at 18:24
    
Also, you'll want that first system.out.println to be in the try statement, otherwise it will unwind the loop further than it should. possibly causing it to halt. –  Kibbee Sep 15 '12 at 18:38
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In effort to provide reasonable evidence that this WILL eventually terminate, I offer the following rather meaningless code. Note: Java is NOT my language, by any stretch of the most vivid imagination. I proffer this up only to support Peter's answer, which is the correct answer to the question.

This attempts to simulate the conditions of what happens when an invoke can NOT happen because it would introduce a stack overflow. It seems to me the hardest thing people are failing to grasp in that the invoke does not happen when it cannot happen.

public class Main
{
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        try
        {   // invoke foo() with a simulated call depth
            Main.foo(1,5);
        }
        catch(Exception ex)
        {
            System.out.println(ex.toString());
        }
    }

    public static void foo(int n, int limit) throws Exception
    {
        try
        {   // simulate a depth limited call stack
            System.out.println(n + " - Try");
            if (n < limit)
                foo(n+1,limit);
            else
                throw new Exception("StackOverflow@try("+n+")");
        }
        finally
        {
            System.out.println(n + " - Finally");
            if (n < limit)
                foo(n+1,limit);
            else
                throw new Exception("StackOverflow@finally("+n+")");
        }
    }
}

The output of this little pointless pile of goo is the following, and the actual exception caught may come as a surprise; Oh, and 32 try-calls (2^5), which is entirely expected:

1 - Try
2 - Try
3 - Try
4 - Try
5 - Try
5 - Finally
4 - Finally
5 - Try
5 - Finally
3 - Finally
4 - Try
5 - Try
5 - Finally
4 - Finally
5 - Try
5 - Finally
2 - Finally
3 - Try
4 - Try
5 - Try
5 - Finally
4 - Finally
5 - Try
5 - Finally
3 - Finally
4 - Try
5 - Try
5 - Finally
4 - Finally
5 - Try
5 - Finally
1 - Finally
2 - Try
3 - Try
4 - Try
5 - Try
5 - Finally
4 - Finally
5 - Try
5 - Finally
3 - Finally
4 - Try
5 - Try
5 - Finally
4 - Finally
5 - Try
5 - Finally
2 - Finally
3 - Try
4 - Try
5 - Try
5 - Finally
4 - Finally
5 - Try
5 - Finally
3 - Finally
4 - Try
5 - Try
5 - Finally
4 - Finally
5 - Try
5 - Finally
java.lang.Exception: StackOverflow@finally(5)
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protected by arshajii Apr 4 '13 at 1:39

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