Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
$LEVELS = array();

function addLevel() {
    $LEVELS[1] = "test";
}

var_dump($LEVELS);

It prints

array(0) {
}

This is annoying the crap out of me. Any help?

share|improve this question
    
you call the function addLevel in your code? –  Alessandro Minoccheri Sep 15 '12 at 15:59
4  
Read up about "variable scope" - php.net/manual/en/language.variables.scope.php –  Mark Baker Sep 15 '12 at 15:59
    
make that variable global. –  yoda Sep 15 '12 at 15:59
1  
@yoda - don't propogate bad practises, global is not the best answer... pass as a function argument instead, and either pass by reference or use a return –  Mark Baker Sep 15 '12 at 16:00
    
I know you're new here, @user1627985. When you're done, don't forget to choose what you consider the best answer. Answer acceptance rate around here matters. (And no, this isn't a plea to choose my answer.) –  Jeremy J Starcher Sep 15 '12 at 16:11

4 Answers 4

You need to call your function first to make its code do anything (and you got just function body somewhere in your code - it does not mean it will be executed). You do not seem to do that. But even you fix this, it will still not work, because you'd working on variables in scope of function (aka local variables). There's is NO $LEVELS array in your function, not the other one is visible inside. So your line $LEVELS[1] = "Test"; simply creates new array visible in scope of function.

To solve your issue you should pass you array to function by reference:

function addLevel( &$myArray ) {
  $myArray[1] = "test";
}

then pass your array:

addLevel( $LEVELS );

you can also use global but this is WRONG so do not do that.

share|improve this answer

It's a variable scope issue.

You need to either pass your variable in as a parameter:

// declare array in global scope
$LEVELS = array(); 
// define function that takes array as parameter     
function addLevel($LEVELS) { 
    $LEVELS[1] = "test";
    return $LEVELS;
}
// execute function, pass array to function scope using parameter
$LEVELS = addLevel($LEVELS);
// show contents
var_dump($LEVELS); 

Or declare it as a global variable:

// declare array in global scope
$LEVELS = array(); 
// define function
function addLevel() { 
    // import array from global scope
    global $LEVELS;
    $LEVELS[1] = "test"; 
}
// execute function
addLevel();
// show contents
var_dump($LEVELS); 

For clarity and to keep the global variable space as empty as possible, the first example (passing as parameter) is usually preferred.

share|improve this answer
$LEVELS = array();

function addLevel() {
    global $LEVELS;
    $LEVELS[1] = "test";
}


addLevel(); // CALL YOUR FUNCTION
var_dump($LEVELS);

That said, this is a better way:

$LEVELS = array();

function addLevel(&$LEVELS) { // This is a pass by reference -- points to the same array
    $LEVELS[1] = "test";
}


addLevel($LEVELS); // CALL YOUR FUNCTION
var_dump($LEVELS);

Or ...

$LEVELS = array();

function addLevel($LEVELS) { // THis gets a copy of the array
    $LEVELS[1] = "test";
    return $LEVELS;          //and send it back
}


$LEVELS = addLevel($LEVELS); // CALL YOUR FUNCTION
var_dump($LEVELS);
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you and others too! –  user1627985 Sep 15 '12 at 16:07

Use "global" in function, if you wan't to access $LEVEL variable.

$LEVELS = array();
function addLevel() {
    global $LEVELS;
    $LEVELS[1] = "test";
}
addLevel();
var_dump($LEVELS);
share|improve this answer
    
And one more thing, addLevel() should be called before var_dump –  Alexander Larikov Sep 15 '12 at 16:00
    
true ;-) i have just copied his code... –  Glavić Sep 15 '12 at 16:01

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.