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I'm trying to read a text file and then afterwards print it out. I can not figure out why I'm getting these Errors:

.c:45: warning: conflicting types for 'read_file'
.c:28: warning: previous implicit declaration of 'read_file' was here
.c: In function 'read_file':
.c:54: error: 'line' undeclared (first use in this function)
.c:54: error: (Each undeclared identifier is reported only once
.c:54: error: for each function it appears in.)
.c:55: error: 'struct line' has no member named 'tmp'
.c:56: warning: incompatible implicit declaration of built-in function 'strncpy'
.c:56: error: 'tmp' undeclared (first use in this function)
.c:57: error: 'cnr' undeclared (first use in this function)

Here is my code:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <time.h>

struct line {
  char *txt;
  struct line *next; 
};

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
  char *command = argv[1];
  char *input = argv[2];
  FILE *file;
  char *txt;

  if(argc < 3) {
    exit(1);
  }

  if(file == NULL) {
    exit(1);
  }

  file = fopen(input, "r");
  exit(1);
  read_file(file);

  if(strcmp(command, "print") == 0) {
    struct line *tmp;
    struct line *first;    
    tmp = first;

    while(tmp != NULL) {
      if(tmp->next == NULL) { //...
    printf(">> %s\n", tmp->txt);
      }
      tmp = tmp->next;
    }  
  }
}

void read_file(FILE *file) {
  struct line *cnt;

  if (file == NULL) {
    exit(1);
  } else {
    struct line *cnt = malloc(sizeof(line));
    cnt->tmp = malloc(sizeof(line));
    strncpy(tmp->next, line, line * 100);
    cnr->next = NULL;
  }
  fclose(file);
}

Can someone help me fix these errors and warnings?

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closed as too localized by nneonneo, Joachim Pileborg, tereško, user97693321, talonmies Sep 17 '12 at 3:42

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3 Answers 3

The compiler is telling you what's wrong. First, you can't use functions you define later without declaring them first, either in a header or at the top of your source. Putting

void read_file(FILE *file);

prior to main will resolve a lot of your problems.

The others I'm leaving for you, but

.c:56: error: 'tmp' undeclared (first use in this function)

means exactly what you think it means. There is no variable called 'tmp' that is in scope where you're using it.

Please don't upvote this. This is like C 101 and was too long for a comment.

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It can be a bit confusing. The first error you are seeing seems to be because you're missing a declaration for the read_file function before the call.

In many cases, C allows calling functions that the compiler hasn't encountered yet. But if you do call such a function, the compiler makes a guess at the function type based on the parameter and context. The compiler guesses wrong. When it encounters the actual 'read_file' function a bit later, in line 45, it complains that it does not match the assumed type.

You could solve it in one of two ways. Either move the definition of the function read_file to somewhere at the top of the file, before the main method which actually calls it, or add a function declaration before the call (for example, after the #include lines), telling the compiler what the read_file function should look like. A function declaration looks like the function definition, but without the body:

void read_file(FILE *file);

Either of the two should solve your first error.

The second error is caused because you have a line referring to a member called 'tmp' in struct line, but it has no such member. Better go back and revise the code. My guess is, you meant to write 'txt'. The reference is done in line 55:

cnt->tmp = malloc(sizeof(line)); // No member cnt->tmp, so you are getting an error.
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Here is the corrected code (explanation is in the comments) :

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <time.h>
#include <string.h>

struct __line {
    char *txt;
    struct __line *next;
};

typedef struct __line line;  // Better to typedef the struct type
// so you can call it without the 'struct' prefix

void read_file(FILE *file);

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
    char *command = argv[1];
    char *input = argv[2];
    FILE *file;
    char *txt;   // This variable is unused

    if(argc < 3) {
        exit(1);
    }

    if(file == NULL) {
        exit(1);
    }

    file = fopen(input, "r");
    exit(1);
    read_file(file);  // You must declare the prototype of the function in the top of the file
    // or the function definition isn't found

    if(strcmp(command, "print") == 0) {  // strcmp function is in string.h
    // you may need to include it
        line *tmp;
        line *first;
        tmp = first;

        while(tmp != NULL) {
            if(tmp->next == NULL) { //...
                printf(">> %s\n", tmp->txt);
           }
            tmp = tmp->next;
        }
    }
}

void read_file(FILE *file) {
    line *cnt;

    if (file == NULL) {
        exit(1);
    } else {
        line *cnt = malloc(sizeof(line));
        cnt->txt = malloc(sizeof(line));   // Syntax error, the member is txt and not tmp
        strcpy(cnt->next->txt, cnt->txt); // maybe here you meant cnt
    // line* 100 as argument doesn't make sence, you're converting a pointer to a number
    // perhaps you wanted to copy all' characters?
    // Remember to don't pass the pointer to the struct, but it's char* field
        cnt->next = NULL;  // cnt instead of cnr
    } 
    fclose(file);
}

One error you do is to pass the pointer of the struct as the argument of strncmp.This is wrong, this way the string would be written in the place where are memorized txt and next, but you don't want this (you may get segmentation fault).Pass the txt field instead.
Another suggest is to handle the return value of read_file instead of terminating the program with exit in case of failure.Instead return -1 so the caller can handle the error.
This is the corrected code, if it doesn't behave like you expected, please let me know.

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