Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I found many examples about setter dependency injection for class member variables, but found it difficult to find any examples about setter dependency injection for local variables inside methods using spring.

How can I do this?

share|improve this question
1  
What would dependency injection for a local variable even mean? Please show us some code with explanation of what you're trying to achieve! –  Don Roby Sep 15 '12 at 17:24
1  
Do you mean constructor injection? Or the injection of variables that don't have setters?... –  Matt Whipple Sep 15 '12 at 17:28
    
maybe I am not clear about why use DI. I see the link link From the example class TextEditor method spellCheck(), I think if the spellChecker is local variable like the following SpellChecker spellChecker = new SpellChecker(); spellChecker.checkSpelling(); Then how to replace the 'new SpellChecker();' with DI? or under this case should not use DI? –  user1169587 Sep 15 '12 at 17:29
1  
The idea with DI would be that it would provide the SpellCheck for purposes of flexibility/test-ability. I noticed also you specify "class" member variables. DI is primarily concerned with object instances and not classes, though most containers by default use a form of Singletons to reuse instances. For the spell check case you'd be best of using setter injection which would set the instance variable. "local" variables as in stack variables are not conventionally used outside of provided hooks. It sounds like you may need to look more into DI and the Strategy Pattern here. –  Matt Whipple Sep 15 '12 at 17:57

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your given example of a SpellChecker being used by a TextEditor class could look like this before it is capable of Dependency Injection. You are creating a new instance of the class SpellChecker inside the method where you are using it.

public class TextEditor {

    public void doSomething() {
        new SpellChecker().checkSpelling();
    }

}

If you want to decouple the code and be able to replace the SpellChecker by a mock for unit testing purposes or by another implementation provided by your Dependency Injection container you have to change the class and provide a field where this instance can be injected.

public class TextEditor {

    @Autowired
    private SpellChecker spellChecker;

    public void doSomething() {
        spellChecker.checkSpelling();
    }

}

Since this is still not easy to test because you would need to use Reflection to inject a mock into that private field you can provide a Setter or make the field package visible by removing the modifier private from the field. So a unit test in the same package can access this field and provide the mock.

share|improve this answer
    
yes, my question is "you have to change the class and provide a field where this instance can be injected.", is this means it is no way to inject the local variable 'spellChecker', But MUST change it to a member variable to use DI? as a side question, I already indent four space before the code sample, but why it still show on one line? what method you have used to post the above sample code? @stefanglase@Don@Matt –  user1169587 Sep 15 '12 at 17:54
1  
Yes, you have to change the class and introduce a field for the dependency. There are ways to capture and inject in places where a statement like new SomeClass() is used but your class would tell something different to what happens when it is executed. See PowerMock for this feature. And to answer your second question: You cannot format code inside comments. –  stefanglase Sep 15 '12 at 18:00
    
sorry for my foolish, what is the meaning of "but your class would tell something different to what happens when it is executed."? anyway, for spring, DI cannot be used on local variable? or DI is not designed for local variable? –  user1169587 Sep 15 '12 at 18:29
1  
A statement like new SpellChecker() should not be translated and executed as get singleton instance from dependency container. Yes you are correct, Spring does not inject into method variables. –  stefanglase Sep 15 '12 at 21:50

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.